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Submission + - The current state of linux email clients? 2

mcloaked writes: We get all kinds of news about new developments but one subject has been lacking for some time and that is email clients for linux (or Windows for that matter).

A number of reviews mostly not all that recent have pointed to the main clients as Thunderbird, Evolution, Claws-mail, and Kmail as possibilities. Up to about a year ago Thunderbird seemed to be
"the" email client with the best mix of positives.

However there are no recent reviews that I have seen and in the meantime Thunderbird has moved to monthly releases which are more maintenance releases, with security fixes, with little real functional change — and little new development. Thunderbird won't be changed into the future much, if one interprets the available news information.

Evolution is reported to be rather prone to being buggy, and kmail even more so. Claws-mail has limitations as does kmail.

So where is the future going without any real innovation on available linux mail clients? We need a well maintained and capable mail
client, with preferably good calendar integration (webcal/google calendar), properly supported html composing, good maildir format storage for local mail, good security support including the capacity
to deal with both gpg and s/mime encryption and signing. It needs a good modern UI, and good import/export facilities as well as good
integration with its address book, including good import/export of addresses.

Are we likely to see this kind of package as we move into the future or will mail clients slowly disappear?
At the moment it looks like email client support is dead — maybe users are moving more into web mail and the cloud rather than having a properly functional mail client on their desktops?

I wonder what do people think?
The Courts

Submission + - Court: Newspaper Articles not Copyrightable (

Yenya writes: "In Slovakia, newspaper articles can be freely aggregated and archived, and are not worth copyright protection. The district court in Bratislava, Slovakia, stated in the case between news publishing house Ecopress and a news monitoring company Storin, that while the news articles manifests traces of creativity, it is not enough to be considered worth protecting the authors rights."

Submission + - Dennis Ritchie passed away (

An anonymous reader writes: I've recently learned that Dennis Ritchie has passed away. Where is the Slashdot love to one of the Unix creators?. Like it or not, Unix and it's programming language, C, has been the more influential pieces of software of all times.
R.I.P. Dennis, and thanks for all the semicolons.


New Linux Petabyte-Scale Distributed File System 132

An anonymous reader writes "A recent addition to Linux's impressive selection of file systems is Ceph, a distributed file system that incorporates replication and fault tolerance while maintaining POSIX compatibility. Explore the architecture of Ceph and learn how it provides fault tolerance and simplifies the management of massive amounts of data."
PlayStation (Games)

PS3 Hacked? 296

Several readers have sent word that George Hotz (a.k.a. geohot), the hacker best known for unlocking Apple's iPhone, says he has now hacked the PlayStation 3. From his blog post: "I have read/write access to the entire system memory, and HV level access to the processor. In other words, I have hacked the PS3. The rest is just software. And reversing. I have a lot of reversing ahead of me, as I now have dumps of LV0 and LV1. I've also dumped the NAND without removing it or a modchip. 3 years, 2 months, 11 days...that's a pretty secure system. ... As far as the exploit goes, I'm not revealing it yet. The theory isn't really patchable, but they can make implementations much harder. Also, for obvious reasons I can't post dumps. I'm hoping to find the decryption keys and post them, but they may be embedded in hardware. Hopefully keys are setup like the iPhone's KBAG."

Ocean-Crossing Dragonflies Discovered 95

grrlscientist writes "While living and working as a marine biologist in Maldives, Charles Anderson noticed sudden explosions of dragonflies at certain times of year. He explains how he carefully tracked the path of a plain, little dragonfly called the Globe Skimmer, Pantala flavescens, only to discover that it had the longest migratory journey of any insect in the world."
Silicon Graphics

Submission + - SGI assets may be sold for $25M

UnanimousCoward writes: Several articles including this one from the San Jose Merc are reporting that SGI has agreed to sell itself for $25 million to Rackable Systems after seeking bankruptcy protection for the second time in three years. A judge still has to approve the deal. Stories like this make me feel old.

Submission + - Human diversity on the decline

jd writes: "In a study covering five different periods of history, from 300 AD to the present day, and geographically spread across much of Europe, scientists have extracted the mitochondrial DNA from a sizable number of individuals in an effort to examine changes in diversity. The results, published in the Royal Society journal is intriguing to say the least. 1700 years ago, three out of every four individuals belonged to a different haplotype. In modern Europe, the number is only one in three. The researchers blame a combination of plague, selection of dominant lineages and culturally-inflicted distortions. The researchers say more work needs to be done, but are unclear if this involves archaeology or experiments involving skewing the data in the local female population."

The easiest way to figure the cost of living is to take your income and add ten percent.