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Comment: Re:This (Score 1) 246

by MightyMartian (#46761709) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

Russia may cite what it likes, but as I've said before, the situation in Kosovo was such that Kosovo's secession was necessary to prevent further crimes against humanity; in particular ethnic cleansing that was almost certain to approach, if not become genocide. There is no indication that any Russian or other minority in Ukraine was under that kind of threat.

What is more, the secession of Kosovo was done under the watchful eye of numerous international agencies, whereas the Crimean "secession" was done with the Russian military and a puppet government running the entire show. To equate Kosovo and Crimea is ludicrous; both from the point of justification and from the point of how the secession was carried out.

It might be one thing if Putin and the Russian parliament hadn't been preparing annexation instruments at the very same time this referendum was being prepared.

Comment: Re:Mr Fixit (Score 2) 431

Debian was a bit longer, so far as mainline releases go (I don't use testing branches). I have several servers and routers running 6.0, and they're all using OpenSSL 0.9.8, whereas my servers I use as KVM virtualization hosts are running Wheezy and did have vulnerable versions of OpenSSL. I had been thinking over the last few months that I should upgrade my old Debian Squeeze servers and appliances, a number of which are used for my OpenVPN WAN routers and remote client servers. I'm very glad my business/procrastination prevented me from upgrading these systems, and hence they remained untouched, and I don't have to go through the pain of regenerating keys and rolling them out to remote routers and to all the road warriors and work-at-home types.

Comment: Ted Unangst's article (Score 4, Informative) 263

by grub (#46758065) Attached to: OpenBSD Team Cleaning Up OpenSSL

Ted Unangst wrote a good article called "analysis of openssl freelist reuse"

His analysis:

This bug would have been utterly trivial to detect when introduced had the OpenSSL developers bothered testing with a normal malloc (not even a security focused malloc, just one that frees memory every now and again). Instead, it lay dormant for years until I went looking for a way to disable their Heartbleed accelerating custom allocator.

it's a very good read.

Comment: Re:Let the pandering begin! (Score 1) 246

by MightyMartian (#46757365) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

The only reason the UN don't recognise it is because China has sufficient influence to make the member states maintain a rather silly fiction.

Well that, and the fact that Chiang Kai Shek insisted upon the pointless ruse that the Kuomintang was still the lawful government of mainland China, and was permitted to keep this delusion by US foreign policy for nearly a quarter century.

Comment: Re:Ukraine's borders were changed by use of force (Score 1) 246

by MightyMartian (#46757217) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

The USSR was a Western ally for precisely as long as it took to beat Nazi Germany. It wasn't a friend to the West before WWII (although I do concede Stalin had approached the Allies with concerns about Nazi Germany in 1938, though at the same time he had absolutely no problem exporting steel to Germany during the whole period), and it wasn't a friend after WWII. While Cold War propaganda may have exaggerated the economic and political ills of the Soviet Union somewhat, at the end of the day, it was no friend of the West.

Comment: Re:Ukraine's borders were changed by use of force (Score 1) 246

by MightyMartian (#46757137) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

The South was not just fighting for the right of states to have slaves. The whole issue of the status of slavery in the states that would be formed out of the territories was probably the largest single factor. The slave states were not just interested in maintaining slavery within their borders, they wanted to have slavery perpetuated as much as possible throughout the Continent United States.

Comment: Re:is this seriously (Score 1) 246

by MightyMartian (#46757103) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

Newsclips of people dancing around does not evidence of unimpeded electoral intent make. In an election such as this, where the borders of a sovereign state are to be redrawn and some of its territory annexed by a much more powerful neighbor, the standards of what constitutes a legitimate election are all the higher, and justifying it under the grounds that you watched a television program where a bunch of people were happy simply does not suffice.

Napoleon I and the III were famous for holding referendums, but I doubt anyone would confuse them with champions of democracy.

Comment: Re:This (Score 1) 246

by MightyMartian (#46756903) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

Whatever the level of support (and we will really never know with any certainty, considering the referendum was backed by the very state that has now annexed Crimea), the point is the same. The sovereign territory of nation states are supposed to be nearly-inviolable against annexation. Special cases exist where the population of a region has been heavily persecuted (ie. Kosovo, South Sudan, East Timor), or where the situation between the governing power and the political entity had been as a client state (ie. Marshall Islands, Namibia). In a few other cases there has been mutually agreed upon terms for separation, as with the splitting of Czechoslovaki into the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Merely having a large number of people of an ethnicity in a specific region is not in and of itself an argument for secession, and most certainly not an argument for a seceding polity to be annexed by another power. Now maybe the end run of a properly handled transition in Ukrainian politics may have been the departure of Crimea and other southern and eastern areas of the country, but the idea that there is any legitimacy to a referendum on allowing a polity to be annexed when the country that is to gain the region is the occupying power is absurd.

Comment: Re:This (Score 1) 246

by MightyMartian (#46756771) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

Was there actually any threat against ethnic Russians anywhere in Ukraine? There seems a long distance to be traveled from angry protesters to the kind of ethnic cleansing that one would expect would be necessary for an external power to walk in and force a separation referendum, even more dubious when the power doing that puts on the ballot "Do you want to join us..."

Comment: Re:This (Score 4, Insightful) 246

by MightyMartian (#46756041) Attached to: Is Crimea In Russia? Internet Companies Have Different Answers

Which is rather like claiming the residents of South Tyrol are Austrian, and perhaps more apropos to the Crimean situation, stating Austria is German.

How precisely Russia threatening to swallow up any of its neighbors' territory because ethnic Russians live there differs from Anschluss escapes.me.

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