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Submission + - Should 'unlimited' mean unlimited? 2

Tom Colimbone writes: Recently, Verizon Wireless agreed to settle a probe into the marketing of its Internet usage plans and reimburse $1 million to customers for wrongful account termination. The issue was centered around the use of the word 'unlimited' in its marketing campaigns for mobile Internet access. Interestingly, O2 in the UK just changed its iPhone tariff, as many potential buyers noticed that the 'unlimited' data package that came with the iPhone was actually capped at 200MB, which wasn't unlimited at all. Outside of wireless providers this might seem like a bizarre question to ask but should the word 'unlimited' truly mean unlimited and if so, should anyone misusing the word have to face similar repercussions to Verizon.

Is a Domain Name an Automatic Trademark? 251

TheWorkingStiff writes "I registered a descriptive domain name (something like "thesimpledog.com") and started a blog on it. About a month later I get a threatening letter from a link farmer who owns "simpledog.com" The owner of simpledog.com is claiming that he owns the trademark to the words simpledog even though he has no real business or rights by that name other than a static page with some text and Adsense slapped on it. There is no product, service or brand whatsoever. Does simply registering a two or three word domain give you instant trademark rights to those words even though you've never done anything with them? Should I give up my domain to a link farmer who is trying to bully me, or does he have a valid right to any phrase he registers that isn't already trademarked?"
The Internet

Submission + - Are 'Achievements' in Online Games Worth It? (kotaku.com)

eldavojohn writes: "There's a brief rant by a writer from Kotaku who tells the story of losing his XBox360 'achievements' & rating. Instead of getting mad, throwing the controller & picking up a Steve Ballmer voodoo doll, he simply sat back and reflected on the inane requirements one must complete to achieve something so minuscule. Are we already back to grade school, walking around with the gold star stickers on our chest that we earned from tediously getting every math problem correct? Or, as the article puts it, "Jesus, since when was it fun to force yourself to play through parts of a game just to earn yourself an arbitrary point score?" Well?"

Every cloud has a silver lining; you should have sold it, and bought titanium.