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+ - Invented here syndrome->

Submitted by edA-qa
edA-qa (536723) writes "Are you afraid to write code? Does the thought linger in your brain that somewhere out there somebody has already done this? Do you find yourself trapped in an analysis cycle where nothing is getting done? Is your product mutating to accommodate third party components? If yes, then perhaps you are suffering from invented-here syndrome.

Most of use are aware of not-invented-here syndrome, but the opposite problem is perhaps equally troublesome. We can get stuck in the mindset that there must be a product, library, or code sample, that already does what we want. Instead of just writing the code we need a lot of effort is spent testing out modules and trying to accommodate our own code. At some point we need to just say, “stop!”, and write the code ourselves."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Semantic games (Score 1) 82

by Z00L00K (#49144687) Attached to: OPSEC For Activists, Because Encryption Is No Guarantee

Opsec is just a procedure you apply.

Invent one procedure that works only for your closed group, it shall only be known to all of you. What the procedures and patterns you have within your closed group will have to be seen as normal variations that to the casual observer don't look outside the ordinary.

A certain variation on how the clothing is worn might be your way of signaling to your group a certain message - or be part of the message when you casually meet.

+ - What happens when Betelgeuse explodes? 1

Submitted by StartsWithABang
StartsWithABang (3485481) writes "One of the great, catastrophic truths of the Universe is that everything has an expiration date. And this includes every single point of light in the entire sky. The most massive stars will die in a spectacular supernova explosion when their final stage of core fuel runs out. At only an estimated 600 light years distant, Betelgeuse is one (along with Antares) of the closest red supergiants to us, and it’s estimated to have only perhaps 100,000 years until it reaches the end of its life. Here's the story on what we can expect to see (and feel) on Earth when Betelgeuse explodes!"

Comment: Living in Europe (Score 1) 2

I'd say that there's a lot of false claims in that article about slow broadband in Europe.

Do a Google Search for "internet speed by country" and you will see that it's not bad at all in Europe. Some countries are better off than others, but it's not related to population density.

So the linked article is full of hot air and is actually funny for me living in Europe how stupid the claims are.

+ - Obama's regs will make Internet slow as in Europe, warn FCC, FEC commissioners-> 2

Submitted by legoleg
legoleg (514805) writes "These Internet regulations will deter broadband deployment, depress network investment and slow broadband speeds. How do we know? Compare Europe, which has long had utility-style regulations, with the United States, which has embraced a light-touch regulatory model. Broadband speeds in the United States, both wired and wireless, are significantly faster than those in Europe. Broadband investment in the United States is several multiples that of Europe. And broadbandâ(TM)s reach is much wider in the United States, despite its much lower population density," the two wrote."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re: I.D. (Score 1) 95

by bazmonkey (#49105007) Attached to: Humans' Big Brains Linked To a Small Stretch of DNA
It should also be considered that for many animals, a gradual increase in intelligence and brain mass isn't much of an advantage. What would a smart cow do differently? I would argue that it was not until our ancestors were 1) standing with two very dexterous spare limbs to play with, and 2) out of our natural environment where there isn't food a-plenty, that even small increases in intelligence was a big advantage. We needed to hunt (communicate and coordinate), and we had the dexterity and capability to carry items over distance that made intelligence worthwhile.

Comment: Re: I.D. (Score 1) 95

by bazmonkey (#49104999) Attached to: Humans' Big Brains Linked To a Small Stretch of DNA
It should also be considered that for many animals, a gradual increase in intelligence and brain mass isn't much of an advantage. What would a smart cow do differently? Would a mouse be able to use tools even if it knew how to make them? Even apes smart enough to use many tools can't do so effectively because they simply lack the fine motor skills to execute. I would argue that it was not until our ancestors were 1) standing with two very dexterous spare limbs to play with, and 2) out of our natural environment where there isn't food a-plenty, that even small increases in intelligence was a big advantage. We needed to hunt (communicate and coordinate), and we had the dexterity and capability to carry items over distance that made intelligence worthwhile.

+ - Fake Komodia root SSL certs in use by over +100 companies->

Submitted by Billly Gates
Billly Gates (198444) writes "Lenovo and Superfish are not the only companies who used the fake root SSL certificates by Komodia to spy and decrypt network traffic. Komodia advertises its products including a SSL-digestor to rid the obtrusive thing we call encryption and security. So far game accelerators are mentioned as some have seen these certs installed with Asus lan accelerator drivers."
Link to Original Source

+ - Homeland Security Urges Lenovo Customers to Remove Superfish

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com (3830033) writes "Reuters reports that the US Department of Homeland Security has advised Lenovo customers to remove "Superfish" software from their computers. According to an alert released through its National Cyber Awareness System the software makes users vulnerable to SSL spoofing and could allow a remote attacker to read encrypted web browser traffic, spoof websites and perform other attacks on Lenovo PCs with the software installed. Lenovo inititally said it stopped shipping the software because of complaints about features, not a security vulnerability. "We have thoroughly investigated this technology and do not find any evidence to substantiate security concerns," the company said in a statement to Reuters early on Thursday. On Friday, Lenovo spokesman Brion Tingler said the company's initial findings were flawed and that it was now advising customers to remove the software and providing instructions for uninstalling "Superfish". "We should have known about this sooner," Tingler said in an email. "And if we could go back, we never would have installed this software on our machines. But we can't, so we are dealing with this head on.""

Innovation is hard to schedule. -- Dan Fylstra

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