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Comment: Running IBM Proventia desktop? (Score 1) 835

by XnPlater (#26573507) Attached to: How To Diagnose a Suddenly Slow Windows Computer?
I've seen similar behavior on my mother's box (Athlon XP 1600+, 768 MB of memory, Windows XP SP2).
The system was dog slow. Each click and every action took up to a minute to complete. No obvious resource hog could be observed under Task Manager.

Eventually, I've upgraded the IBM Proventia Desktop app (came with a VPN package) to a newer version, and the system literally recovered from a slow stutter to a normal (usable) pace.
Space

+ - Cosmic 'Bullets' Traced to Galactic Black Holes 1

Submitted by dork
dork (524217) writes "The Pierre Auger Observatory announced that active galactic nuclei are the most likely candidates for the source of the highest-energy cosmic rays that hit Earth. Using the Southern Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, the largest cosmic-ray observatory in the world, spanning over more than 3000 square kilometers, they found that the sources of the highest-energy particles are not distributed uniformly across the sky, linking the origins of these "cosmic bullets" to the locations of nearby galaxies, hosting active nuclei in their centers. These galaxies are thought to be powered by supermassive monster black holes that are devouring large amounts of matter. The exact mechanism of how particles get accelerated to energies 100 million times higher than achievable by the most powerful particle accelerators on Earth is still a mystery. A fraction of recorded events is also available through a public online event display."
Space

+ - Clue to highest-energy cosmic rays discovered->

Submitted by dork
dork (666) writes "The Pierre Auger Observatory announced today (with impressive press coverage) that active galactic nuclei are the most likely candidates for the source of the highest-energy cosmic rays that hit Earth. Using the Southern Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina, the largest cosmic-ray observatory in the world, spanning over more than 3000 square kilometers, a team of scientists from 17 countries found that the sources of the highest-energy particles are not distributed uniformly across the sky. Instead, the Auger results link the origins of these mysterious particles to the locations of nearby galaxies, hosting active nuclei in their centers and thought to be powered by supermassive black holes that are devouring large amounts of matter. The exact mechanism of how they can accelerate particles to energies 100 million times higher than the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth is still a mystery. A fraction of Pierre Auger Observatory measured events is also available through a public online event display."
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I have never seen anything fill up a vacuum so fast and still suck. -- Rob Pike, on X.

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