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Comment: UK regulations (Score 1) 105

by Anonymous Brave Guy (#47955015) Attached to: Star Wars Producers Want a 'DroneShield' To Prevent Leaks On Set

I would guess these drones are not flying LOS, therefore disrupting video and telemetry would make it very difficult for a drone operator to effectively maneuver, make any interesting video, and even return the drone back to safety.

This is in the UK, where there are clear legal requirements if you want to operate a drone. People can be and have been prosecuted for violating them.

So it is highly unlikely that any such drones were flying without LOS at close range or that they would be used by any reputable commercial surveillance firm without permission. As the cases mentioned above demonstrate, someone who violates the rules may well wind up in court with a hefty fine, and the authorities aren't going to look sympathetically on any excuses about losing control of the aircraft or being somewhere it shouldn't be accidentally.

By the way, responding to drones by disrupting frequencies using jammers as you suggested would, as a minimum, probably land you in hot water with the communications regulators yourself.

Comment: Re:The Drone Wars (Score 1) 105

by Anonymous Brave Guy (#47954935) Attached to: Star Wars Producers Want a 'DroneShield' To Prevent Leaks On Set

Plot twist: This is all a big double bluff, and they deliberately set up both the familiar-looking ships and "unexpected" delay in the "shield" that would prevent the leaks. Meanwhile, the real models are being filmed on interior sets no-one knows about at a studio far, far away...

Comment: Re:I've never shorted a stock (Score 1) 95

by TheRaven64 (#47953737) Attached to: Microsoft Kills Off Its Trustworthy Computing Group
XP also tweaked the VM subsystem in a way that was quite noticeable if you had more than about 256MB of RAM (better performance), but the main feature it added was remote desktop (although only in the Pro version). I was quite tempted to upgrade from 2K for the remote desktop stuff.

Comment: Re:Must be an american thing ??? (Score 1) 61

by mcgrew (#47953295) Attached to: More unsurprisingly conservative ads on slashdot

The whole "needles in the eyeball" are just a stepping stone to something truly amazing.

Indeed. I was severely nearsighted all my life, after the cataract surgery I no longer need corrective lenses at all, not even reading glasses and I'm 62. My vision in that eye went from 20/400 to 20/16. Truly a miracle.

BTW, my retina surgeon said that my retinal detachment was a result of being so nearsighted; a nearsighted eyeball isn't perfectly round like a normally sighted person's eyes.

Comment: Re:What for? (Score 1) 182

by TheRaven64 (#47953219) Attached to: Why Apple Should Open-Source Swift -- But Won't
I'm not a huge fan. The goal of D was to produce a better C++, but if you're designing a new language then C++ really isn't where I'd choose to start. It's not as bad as Ruby (I can't imagine the kind of person who would look at Smalltalk and say 'what this language really needs is Perl-like syntax'. Actually, I can't imagine the kind of person who'd say that about any language. Including Perl). Rust is probably the modern language that I like the most.

Comment: Re:And they wonder why I block ads... (Score 3, Interesting) 192

by hairyfeet (#47952537) Attached to: Google's Doubleclick Ad Servers Exposed Millions of Computers To Malware

Obviously you've never loaded one of the "aggressive" flash ads with a bunch of buttons and clickable crap built into the animation? Because I have seen one of those drag a 3GHz quad down to a crawl thanks to all the crap its trying to render being spread like the clap across a dozen CDNs, half of whom take forever and a day to respond or time out, which causes it to call the next CDN in its list...yeah sorry but the new ads are even nastier than you can imagine.

If you want to see it for yourself just surf some "mainstream" sites like CNN, AOL, Yahoo "News" and the like for a couple hours with no adblocking, just be sure to have an offline disc image so you can blast the OS and restore from images. Hell I used to use a VM at the shop to let an image get the latest drive bys to test various AVs and stay up to date on removal methods but not anymore, with the latest bloated mess called "interactive ads" I had to quit because even with a C2D doing nothing but running the VM those bastards would slam it so hard I'd be lucky if I could kill the VM, it would just redline the cores to the firewall, nasty shit. Maybe if I slapped in a C2Q and limited the VM to only 2 or 3 cores I could do it again but frankly articles like this only prove my theory correct, back any precious memories, nuke the OS, and make sure they have a choice of browsers with ABP loaded into all of them.

Oh and just FYI since insisting that my customers only use browsers I've preloaded with ABP? I've watched infections disappear, even my most clueless click happy customers only have to call me for hardware or networking issues. Of course it turned out just as I told my clueless former boss it would, because I'm "the guy that builds PCs so they don't mess up" I get referrals up the ying yang so I don't have to worry about repeat business, they are happy to tell everybody and their dog the ONLY place they should get a PC fixed or have one worked on is from/by me.

Comment: Re:Change Jobs (Score 1) 247

That is IMHO a much more realistic view. Conflating management with technical leadership is a sure path to bad things happening. Certainly some people can do both, but for any given project at any given time, everyone should know what their current role is.

To answer the original question, I think you can sum up the cause of a lot of programmer fatigue very easily: they got into programming out of a desire to create things, and they found themselves surrounded by a (bad) organisational culture where they instead spend their work time doing anything but create things.

It's not the need for a degree of administration and management that is the problem. Most programmers understand this, and will happily go along with it when it's helpful for the project as a whole. Nor is it the need to create something that serves the needs of the project, even if that isn't the most fun job to do right now. Again, I think most programmers understand that if you're working as a professional then you're being hired to make something that is useful/valuable for someone else, and as long as what they're making is in that category it can be satisfying.

But most programmers are also acutely sensitive to overheads that are unhelpful and requirements that are unnecessary -- not that they really need to be if they're at the kind of shop where those overheads take up most of their time. Geeks will rapidly lose enthusiasm in the face of uninspiring leadership, lack of project progress, and generally incompetent management, and often I suspect it really is as simple as that.

Comment: Re:I FIND THIS HIGHLY... (Score 1) 437

by Jeremiah Cornelius (#47949003) Attached to: Science Has a Sexual Assault Problem

It's a little [illogical] to say a tomato is a vegetable. It's very [illogical] to say it's a suspension bridge.

Logic is a binary function. Something is in a logical set - or it is not. Being illogical is not a synonym for being mistaken. Degrees of precision are irrelevant for set inclusion. Fuzzy logic is not logic.

BTW: It is illogical to conclude that a Tomato in NOT a vegetable, simply because it belongs to a taxonomical subclass, "fruit". It as if I were to say your testicle is not animal.

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