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Comment Re:There's more to it than profit. (Score 2) 232

Yup. The gigafactory is both now, and has always been, their major project. They're going to be in the red until it is built. In the meantime, the waning capital is a chance to invest early for people who are savvy about how revolutionary Tesla is poised to be.

Comment Summer factory work (Score 1) 179

I was employed for the summer at a large knitting mill. I despised the job. NAFTA was passed, and before the ink could dry the company announced that it was moving all operations to Mexico, laying off most of their staff and leaving a skeleton crew to break down the factory. They didn't fire anyone because, you know, then they'd have to provide unemployment benefits. So everyone just got laid off instead. I can't say I was sad to have lost the job. I did however feel bad for the people who had been working at the mill 40+ years who were losing their livelihood and had no other employable skills.
Space

Hubble Takes Amazing New Images of Andromeda, Pillars of Creation 97

The Hubble Space Telescope was launched in April, 1990. In 1995, it presented us with one of its most iconic images: a close-up of gas pillars in the Eagle Nebula, dubbed the "Pillars of Creation." Now, as HST approaches its 25th anniversary, astronomers have re-shot the pillars at a much higher resolution. Here are direct images links: visible light, comparison with old image, near-infrared light. "The infrared view transforms the pillars into eerie, wispy silhouettes seen against a background of myriad stars. That's because the infrared light penetrates much of the gas and dust, except for the densest regions of the pillars. Newborn stars can be seen hidden away inside the pillars."

That's not the only new image from Hubble today: NASA has also released the most high definition view of the Andromeda Galaxy that we've ever seen. Here's a web-friendly image, but that doesn't really do it justice. The full image is 69,536 px by 22,230 px. To see Andromeda in all its glory, visit the ESA's dedicated, zoomable site that contains all the image data. At the highest zoom levels, you can make out a mind-blowing number of individual stars. Andromeda is over 2 million light-years distant.

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