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Comment Re:Corporate death penalty (Score 0) 94

You missed the point of Asimov's robot stories. The laws are in insufficient and don't work IRL. Also corporations exist first of all to enrich the owners and shareholders, all other functions are tangential to that goal.

You want this behaviour (patent trolling) actually to stop? The only thing that is required and that can work is to ban government from setting rules. All patent and copyright laws need to be abolished.

Comment Re:Huh? (Score 0) 170

I was learning from a book. It's an item made of paper, it is of a rectangular shape with multiple pieces of paper of the same shape connected together in such a manner, that one can flip any piece of paper to look at either side of it and to move on to another piece of paper. On this paper there were various letters (similar to letters you would find in any online ad today) and also drawings. These letters and drawings were arranged in such a manner as to allow a person looking at them to sequentially retrieve pieces of information. The information retrieved from such a contraption was in a number of ways similar to what one can retrieve today by loading a page from any Wordpress site (or possibly even a Wiki site). Of-course on paper the hyperlinking could not be implemented in a feasible manner, so instead of clickable links there were textual references to other sources and that was definitely a shortcoming. On the other hand ad banners and kitty porn wasn't sprinkled throughout the pieces of paper (pages) and so it was easier to concentrate on the task of information retrieval.


Creator of Relay On BITNET, Predecessor of IRC, Dies ( 34

tmjva writes: Jeff Kell passed away on November 25 as reported here in the 3000newswire. He was inventor of BITNET Relay, a predecessor of Internet Relay Chat using the REXX programming language.

In 1987 he wrote the following preserved article about RELAY and here is his obituary. May this early inventor rest in peace.

Submission + - Air Force hires civilian drone pilots for combat patrols - legality questioned (

schwit1 writes: For the first time, civilian pilots and crews now operate what the Air Force calls "combat air patrols," daily round-the-clock flights above areas of military operations to provide video and collect other sensitive intelligence.

Civilians are not allowed to pinpoint targets with lasers or fire missiles. They operate only Reapers that provide intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, known as ISR, said Air Force Gen. Herbert "Hawk" Carlisle, head of Air Combat Command.

Comment Re:anti-business liberal scoring points (Score 0) 371

My answer to this is very simple actually, if there is no business case to go to Mars I don't want any government stealing money from people to go to Mars because at that point it is all it is: theft.

Eventually a business case for Mars may become real and then businesses will find a way to get there. Today it is likely not the case at all that there is any sort of ROI on going to Mars except for raising spirits of those, who want to see it happen.

Well, if the people who WANT to see it happen actually PAY for it by BUYING bonds that would pay for it, then a private business can do it without government! That's because a private business can print bonds that can be sold (tentatively) to people and if enough money is raised then actually collect the money and start building.

To do it otherwise is to steal, but that's nothing new, that's what all governments always do.

Comment linux based POS (Score 0) 94

One of the benefits and reasons why we build Linux based systems for retail chain management, store management, supply chain management, e-commerce and such is ability to secure against these types of attacks better. Beyond that we came up with a new way of protecting credit card information by tying it to the location of the user's phone, but we are not a nominal 'fintech' and those guys are too hard to approach (for now at least).

Submission + - GlassRAT Targets Chinese Nationals, Lurked for 3 Years Undetected (

chicksdaddy writes: RSA researchers issued a report today ( about a remote access trojan (or RAT) program dubbed “GlassRAT” that they are linking to sophisticated and targeted attacks on “Chinese nationals associated with large multinational corporations," The Security Ledger reports. (

Discovered by RSA in February of this year, GlassRAT was first created in 2012 and “appears to have operated, stealthily, for nearly 3 years in some environments,” in part with the help of a legitimate certificate from a prominent Chinese software publisher and signed by Symantec and Verisign, RSA reports.

The software is described as a “simple but capable RAT” that packs reverse shell features that allow attackers to remotely control infected computers as well as transfer files and list active processes. The dropper program associated with the file poses as the Adobe Flash player, and was named “Flash.exe” when it was first detected.

RSA discovered it on the PC of a Chinese national working for a large, U.S. multi-national corporation. RSA had been investigating suspicious network traffic on the enterprise network. RSA says telemetry data and anecdotal reports suggest that GlassRAT may principally be targeting Chinese nationals or other Chinese speakers, in China and elsewhere, since at least early 2013.

RSA said it has discovered links between GlassRAT and earlier malware families including Mirage, Magicfire and PlugX. Those applications have been linked to targeted campaigns against the Philippine military and the Mongolian government. (

Submission + - A Secretive Air Cargo Operation Is Running in Ohio, and Signs Point to Amazon (

citadrianne writes: In 2013, at the height of the holiday season, a surge of last minute Amazon orders and bad weather left many customers without gifts under the tree on Christmas day.

Amazon said the problem was not due to issues with its warehouses or staff, but failures on the part of UPS and other shipping partners. It apologized and reimbursed some customers with $20 gift cards, but the debacle underscored for Amazon the disadvantages of relying on third party shippers for its delivery process.

Since then, Amazon has been increasingly investing in its own alternatives, from contracting additional couriers to rolling out its own trucks in some cities.

The latest rumored venture into Amazon shipping has a name: Aerosmith.

An air cargo operation by that name launched in September of this year in Wilmington, Ohio on a trial basis. The operation is being run by the Ohio-based aviation holding company Air Transport Services Group, or ATSG, out of a state-of-the art facility. It's shipping consumer goods for a mysterious client that many believe to be Amazon.

Submission + - Fake Bomb Detector, Blamed for Hundreds of Deaths, Is Still in Use writes: Murtaza Hussain writes at The Intercept that although it remains in use at sensitive security areas throughout the world, the ADE 651 is a complete fraud and the ADE-651’s manufacturer sold it with the full knowledge that it was useless at detecting explosives. There are no batteries in the unit and it consists of a swivelling aerial mounted to a hinge on a hand-grip. The device contains nothing but the type of anti-theft tag used to prevent stealing in high street stores and critics have likened it to a glorified dowsing rod.

The story of how the ADE 651 came into use involves the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq. At the height of the conflict, as the new Iraqi government battled a wave of deadly car bombings, it purchased more than 7,000 ADE 651 units worth tens of millions of dollars in a desperate effort to stop the attacks. Not only did the units not help, the device actually heightened the bloodshed by creating “a false sense of security” that contributed to the deaths of hundreds of Iraqi civilians. A BBC investigation led to a subsequent export ban on the devices.

The device is once again back in the news as it was reportedly used for security screening at hotels in the Egyptian resort city of Sharm el-Sheikh where a Russian airliner that took off from that city’s airport was recently destroyed in a likely bombing attack by the militant Islamic State group. Speaking to The Independent about the hotel screening, the U.K. Foreign Office stated it would “continue to raise concerns” over the use of the ADE 651. James McCormick, the man responsible for the manufacture and sale of the ADE 651, received a 10-year prison sentence for his part in manufacture of the devices, sold to Iraq for $40,000 each. An employee of McCormick who later became a whistleblower said that after becoming concerned and questioning McCormick about the device, McCormick told him the ADE 651 “does exactly what it’s designed to. It makes money.”

Comment Re:It will never go anywhere. (Score 0) 27

Well, not all companies do that, some base their business model around personal security, for example numbered bank accounts are designed on purpose not to let authorities (or anybody) know who is the owner if the account. Bearer certificates have the same purpose actually, they are like cash in that regard.

Now, governments fight against such very important individual freedoms of-course. Governments destroy personal freedoms much more than any company ever could.

The solution of this problem is trivial and is left as an exercise for the reader.