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Comment: "Net neutrality", my ass. (Score 1, Interesting) 91

by jcr (#47803049) Attached to: Net Neutrality Campaign To Show What the Web Would Be Like With a "Slow Lane"

It's a buzzword for demanding federal control of the internet, to remedy the government-caused problem of last mile providers who are protected from competition by local cable monopoly privileges.

All we need to solve the problem of the Comcasts and the Time-warners of the world is to expose them to competition.

-jcr

Comment: "otherwise it would be forbidden "? (Score 2) 180

by jcr (#47781703) Attached to: The Executive Order That Led To Mass Spying, As Told By NSA Alumni

Bullshit. It's ILLEGAL, period. Executive orders don't trump acts of congress, and acts of congress don't override the constitution. Every NSA minion involved in collecting this data without a warrant issued by a judge naming a specific person and stating what they're looking for and why, is a CRIMINAL.

-jcr

Comment: Re:Her work (Score 1) 1262

by jcr (#47774639) Attached to: Anita Sarkeesian, Creator of "Tropes vs. Women," Driven From Home By Trolls

How can you tell when you receive a lot of death threats whether any of them are credible?

I've had a dozen or so death threats over the years, and two of them have mentioned where I lived and/or worked at the time. Nobody's showed up to kill me yet.

"When all is said and done, a great deal more is said than done."

-jcr

+ - Some raindrops exceed their terminal velocity->

Submitted by sciencehabit
sciencehabit (1205606) writes "New research reveals that some raindrops are “super-terminal” (they travel more than 30% faster than their terminal velocity, at which air resistance prevents further acceleration due to gravity). The drops are the result of natural processes—and they make up a substantial fraction of rainfall. Whereas all drops the team studied that were 0.8 millimeters and larger fell at expected speeds, between 30% and 60% of those measuring 0.3 mm dropped at super-terminal speeds. It’s not yet clear why these drops are falling faster than expected, the researchers say. But according to one notion, the speedy drops are fragments of larger drops that have broken apart in midair but have yet to slow down. If that is indeed the case, the researchers note, then raindrop disintegration happens normally in the atmosphere and more often than previously presumed—possibly when drops collide midair or become unstable as they fall through the atmosphere. Further study could improve estimates of the total amount of rainfall a storm will produce or the amount of erosion that it can generate."
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An age is called Dark not because the light fails to shine, but because people refuse to see it. -- James Michener, "Space"

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