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Submission + - ISIS terror manual out in open

William Robinson writes: ISIS has issued a chilling guide describing how to carry out 'lone wolf' terror attacks. The 64-page guide was first published by al-Qaeda but has been updated by ISIS extremists to include advice on how would-be attackers can avoid being detected. The 12-chapter manual is also said to reveal how to go online without being detected and how to tell if a spy is trying to infiltrate a small cell.

Submission + - Doughnuts Around Black Hole Found Clumpy

William Robinson writes: The most massive black holes in the universe are often encircled by thick doughnut-shaped disks of material, which ultimately feeds and nourishes the growing black holes tucked inside. Recent observations, done by a team of astronomers have used the NASA NuSTAR and ESA XMM-Newton X-ray observatories to peer inside, shows that, the rotating material is not a simple doughnut as originally thought, but clumpy. Doughnuts around supermassive black holes were first proposed in the mid-80s to explain why some black holes are hidden behind gas and dust, while others are not. The idea is that the orientation of the doughnut relative to Earth affects the way we perceive a black hole and its intense radiation. If the doughnut is viewed edge-on, the black hole is blocked. If the doughnut is viewed face-on, the black hole and its surrounding, blazing materials can be detected.

Submission + - NASA Test Fires RS-25

William Robinson writes: NASA's main engine for Exploration Mission-1 in 2018 RS-25 was test fired. The test was the sixth of seven planned hot-fire trials for the RS-25, which also served as the main engine for NASA's now-retired space shuttle fleet. In future, four RS-25s will power the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS) megarocket that will launch astronauts in the Orion spacecraft on missions to deep space and eventually on the journey to Mars.

Comment Re:No-information voters (Score 1) 67

In India, voters decide whom to vote based on many criterions, such as who is giving away freebies, who is paying me money, who belongs to my cast, who belongs to my religion, who is talking about giving children of my community a special reservation in school colleges and jobs,who helped me in corruption, who is going to help me to get away with those inefficiency and bribe charges etc.

You see, Internet and Search Engines do not play big role here.

Submission + - India blocks over 800 porn websites

William Robinson writes: The government of India has blocked through a secret order. Among the sites that are banned include some of the world's biggest porn sites like Pornhub and Xvideos. The ban has provoked debates in the country about extreme and unwarranted moral policing by the government. The action has come after the Supreme Court of India had refused to ban porn sites in India.

Comment Re:Yes, the $20 ikea hack. (Score 2) 340

I used to give presentations on 'professional hazards' and it is no secret that continuously sitting in front of computer could give you neck, back, wrist/fingers/thumb, eyes etc related issues.

The solution is really simple. Just develop a habit of getting out of your chair for 5 minutes, stretch and walk around, pull your fingers and twist your body in every comfortable way you could while focusing on object hundreds of meters away. Make sure the blood is flowing by feeing it, and then only get back in the chair again.

Submission + - So There Are Quakes on Moon Too

William Robinson writes: Clive R. Neal, associate professor of civil engineering and geological sciences at the University of Notre Dame has reached conclusion that there are quakes on Moon too, after he and his team of 15 scientists re-examined the data collected by seismometers placed on moon between 1969 and 1972. He found that there are at least four different kinds of moonquakes: (1) deep moonquakes about 700 km below the surface, probably caused by tides; (2) vibrations from the impact of meteorites; (3) thermal quakes caused by the expansion of the frigid crust when first illuminated by the morning sun after two weeks of deep-freeze lunar night; and (4) shallow moonquakes only 20 or 30 kilometers below the surface. Moonquakes last much longer than earthquakes, he found, probably because of presence of water on earth.

Submission + - Fuel Free Spacecrafts Using Graphene

William Robinson writes: While using a laser to cut a sponge made of crumpled sheets of Graphene oxide, Researchers accidentally discovered that it can turn light into motion. As the laser cut into the material, it mysteriously propelled forward. Baffled, researchers investigated further. The Graphene material was put in a vacuum and again shot with a laser. Incredibly, the laser still pushed the sponge forward, and by as much as 40 centimeters. Researchers even got the Graphene to move by focusing ordinary sunlight on it with a lens.Though scientists are not sure why this happens, they are excited with new possibilities such as light propelled spacecraft that does not need fuel.

Submission + - New Technique to Develop Single Molecule Diode

William Robinson writes: Under the direction of Latha Venkataraman, associate professor of applied physics at Columbia Engineering, researchers have designed a new technique to create a single-molecule diode, that has rectification ratio as high as 250, and 'ON' current as high as 0.1 microamps. The idea of creating a single-molecule diode was suggested by Arieh Aviram and Mark Ratner who theorized in 1974, which has been the 'holy grail' of molecular electronics ever since its inception to achieve further miniaturization, because single molecule represent the limit of miniaturization.

Submission + - MAVEN detects auroras in northern skies of MARS

William Robinson writes: One day, when humans go to Mars, they might find that, occasionally, the Red Planet has green skies. In late Dec. 2014, NASA's MAVEN spacecraft detected evidence of widespread auroras in Mars's northern hemisphere. According to the MAVEN data, solar particles that caused the "Christmas lights" penetrated deeply into the Martian atmosphere---sparking auroras less than 100 km from the surface. That's lower than auroras on Earth, which range from 100 km to 500 km high. Auroras occur, both on Earth and Mars, when energetic particles from space rain down on the upper atmosphere. On Earth, these particles are guided toward the poles by our planet's global magnetic field. That's why auroras are seen most often around the Arctic and Antarctic. On Mars, there is no organized planetary magnetic field to guide the particles north and south—so they can go anywhere. The European Space Agency's Mars Express had also found ultraviolet glow coming from "magnetic umbrellas" in the southern hemisphere, ten years ago.

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