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Comment: Re:Earthshaking (Score 1, Insightful) 124

Obviously they are either incompetent or not willing to pay for proper maintenance. These switch centers should be inspected yearly by someone using heat measuring video, this finds any hot spots which are usually caused by bolts getting loose over time from contraction or weakening from heat. I can not think of a single plant that I have worked in that does not do this. The downtime cost way outstrips the expense of doing it.

Comment: Re:great photowork there (Score 1) 93

by WillRobinson (#47135087) Attached to: How LEDs Are Made

Hate to tell you, K&S is not the leader in die bonding or wire bonding, but thats just from my observation in factories full of die bonders and wire bonders.

I design build and install backend semiconductor equipment, since the late 70's.

Back in the 1980's huge factories in Asia were installing the latest automated equipment. It was not unusual for us to install die bonders that were capable of 5k parts per hour per machine. In groups of 40 machines per device.
These were dedicated to a particular type of lead frame. But could mount multiple types of die. We had lines of 2N2222's at customers putting out over 20 million parts per week, all in a area the size of that room shown, including wire bonding. They had streamlined the whole process including injection molding, testing, and marking in a area only 5 times that room size. Before the automation there was 1000 girls per shift doing the same thing.

I was amazed that the Asian factories had such good automation compared to what I had see in factories here in the USA. But it was truly due to total volume. Here I NEVER saw a factory if the scale I would see there. Now I used to put this over to just labor, overhead cost etc in my mind back then. Later I would think it was due to regulation. Instead I now put it to foresight. They they knew if they could do it even 1/10 cent cheeper they would get the work. And if they got the work, it would never come back here to the USA. And they were right.

Led work is somewhat slower, especially those T1 frames they are using. They have to be handled vertically, and the spacing in between is large. So indexing time and centering of the cup takes a bit more work. Back when we did make machines for that product, the typical machine ran about 2K parts per hour. I am sure now, a bit faster indexing is possible. Thats why so many leds now are done on flat stock and molded and surface mounted, density and speed of manufacturing is much higher.

What they are showing is a cheep startup. Sales of led's by the container load are cheep, as it is a very stable process and anybody can do it. Where the problem comes in is manufacturing variables mostly in the wafer to have even appearing leds. Since the majority of leds are for human viewing, doing things like stop lights or where there are more than one led per product, we want them to appear the same, and look the same over time. So if you get led's from different lots they can appear to be different to the human eye. Especially if they are high output, as heat dissipation over time really degrades the device. That is also why they dont mount die directly to a PCB for stop lights. You can see if one die is different from the other, and while it is possible to adjust each die with a resistor, this adds another step, laser trimming of resistors using visual feedback. The cost of changing out a led made on a metal frame, and the cost of laser trimming is vast, when speed of manufacturing is involved. Much cheaper to just remove the leds and put another in, same for repair. If you pot a lens over a single pcb with multiple dies, it is no longer repairable.

Comment: They will never learn (Score 2) 276

by WillRobinson (#45369755) Attached to: Snowden Used Social Engineering To Get Classified Documents

There are no secrets.. They eventually get out.

What I am curious about, is with all this data they are sifting how come there is nobody from Washington in Jail? You know they are
mostly self serving scumbags.

What bothers me more about all this data, and is never mentioned, is that it is possible now for people who have access to all this
big data, to profit from it on the stock market very easily.

Comment: While I live in Texas (Score 2) 817

by WillRobinson (#41763985) Attached to: Texas Attorney General Warns International Election Observers

First off, if you were going to monitor every polling location in Texas with one person, it would require a army larger than most other nations have.
While I am not going to debate the Texas AG statements, one thing is bothering me.

  If the Constitution has given the states the power to control their elections process within the requirements set out by the constitution, then the Federal Government signing a treaty dictating a process in the election is doing a end around the Constitution
That seems UN-lawful to me, of course my faith in the federal government has waned over the years to, so there is no surprise there.

I have personally been involved in the election process on the inside, and at least where we were, with extreme voter turnout last
presidential election, I saw nothing that raised my eyebrow. If there is any election rigging its beyond the actual voting process itself.
Either by electronics afterwards, or fraudulent voter registration. Neither that would be able to be verified by being on site with anybody.

And as far as the 100 foot rule, they are pretty firm on that. You can be outside at the proper distance and hold signs to your hearts content
but show any brow beating and they will remove you. Which is the right thing to do. I really do not think there is anything to see here in this issue.

Comment: Re:Pry XP from cold, stiff fingers (Score 2) 727

by WillRobinson (#41729731) Attached to: Microsoft Urges Businesses To Get Off XP

I agree, I have quite a few robotic machines running xp, have spent tons of money developing multi threaded C++ programs for them. Just changing to their new development environment, new drivers for the specialized hardware will be expensive. And it just works fine as it is. There is no advantage in speed of
the machines etc.

Comment: Re:It's what happens... (Score 1) 316

by WillRobinson (#41435959) Attached to: Apple Wants Another $707 Million From Samsung

Have you ever been grilled before being on a jury? As soon as they find out you have a analytical mind, they will drop you like a hot potato, they want decisions based off emotions.

Here is my example, in being interviewed the lawyer gave a hypothetical situation and asked for a answer. nobody raised their hand, so I did. He asked for my answer and I told him he did not give me enough information to make an informed decision. He said your exactly right, your dismissed!

"No problem is so formidable that you can't walk away from it." -- C. Schulz

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