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Comment: Re:What now? 1 billion! (Score 1) 285

by WillKemp (#46784035) Attached to: Apache OpenOffice Reaches 100 Million Downloads. Now What?

I never liked Publisher much, and back in the 90s I used to use a pirate copy of PageMaker - which I liked a lot. In later years I used Scribus a bit, which was ok, but not as good as PageMaker. If Scribus has continued on the course of development it was on a few years back, it should be pretty good by now.

Comment: Re:What now? 1 billion! (Score 1) 285

by WillKemp (#46783911) Attached to: Apache OpenOffice Reaches 100 Million Downloads. Now What?

Why would anyone use Excel for anything?

Because it's quick and easy for basic stuff, and useful for making graphs from simple data. That's why I use LibreOffice Calc, anyway. Using a spreadsheet for real data is like using Word / Writer for desktop publishing - it's quick and easy but totally bodgy.

Comment: Re:how many of these people don't want to retire? (Score 2) 323

by WillKemp (#46783795) Attached to: I expect to retire ...

[......] pay off their mortgage, sell the house, downsize, and have a nice $50,000-200,000 fund in addition to a smaller house that's easier to take care of. Of course, the housing market is volatile, too...

If you retire at 65 and live till 85, that $200,000 is only about $10,000 a year - which won't get you far!

Comment: Re:Seems like result would be higher price (Score 1) 85

by WillKemp (#45742989) Attached to: Govt. Watchdog Group Finds Apple Misled Aussies On Consumer Rights

Do you really have the ability to ask for a refund for a full two years?

You can ask for a refund for as long as seems reasonable. However, ultimately it comes down to what the adjudicator in your state or territory's fair trading tribunal thinks is reasonable - or, maybe, what you can convince the retailer they would find reasonable.

The amount of time that's reasonable would probably depend on the nature and price of the item. If it was something that should reasonably be expected to last, say, 5 years, you could possibly make a case for it to be replaced or refunded for up to that length of time. However, it's likely the tribunal would be less sympathetic to that as time goes on - although it may depend on how much you would be inconvenienced by repair.

With cheaper goods, it may come down to how much it will cost the retailer to defend themselves in the tribunal versus the cost of replacement or refund - particularly if you convince them you know your rights and will put up a good fight.

Comment: Re:Seems like result would be higher price (Score 1) 85

by WillKemp (#45742643) Attached to: Govt. Watchdog Group Finds Apple Misled Aussies On Consumer Rights

Australian law requires Apple to fix the issue. That can be done (A) by just giving you a brand new device while you are in the store, or (B) by having you send it out for repair and wait a week...

As a consumer I'd rather have (A) than (B). Making Apple have to support longer warranties out of the gate means that they would be more likely to do (B) [......]

Under Australian law, the consumer gets the choice - not Apple. You have the right to choose replacement, refund, or repair. Most retailers try and convince you that a faulty item must be repaired and they can't replace or refund - mentioning your state or territory's fair trading department usually changes their mind instantly.

Comment: Re:Seems like result would be higher price (Score 3, Informative) 85

by WillKemp (#45734521) Attached to: Govt. Watchdog Group Finds Apple Misled Aussies On Consumer Rights

The end effect I can see of countries forcing long warranties on products [......]

They're not forcing long warranties on products. The law merely requires that a good should be of merchantable quality and fit for purpose - anything else is essentially fraud anyway.

Another possibility is that Apple would become more stingy with repair/replacement, which would be a shame as it's really nice to go in and have them say "well, this just isn;t working, have a new one".

They're not being generous, it's what Australian law requires them to do.

Comment: Re: Greed! (Score 5, Insightful) 281

by WillKemp (#45406357) Attached to: Music Industry Issues Take Down Notices to 50 Major Lyrics Sites

Well we all know how much lyrics sites lead to a loss in sales for these companies.

Quite the opposite, i'd say. I've often heard a song i liked on the radio, but not known what it was called or who it was by, and then googled bits of lyrics to find out so i could buy it. And i'm sure i'm not the only person who does that. The Google search inevitably takes me to one of those lyrics sites. If they weren't there, chances are i wouldn't have bought the song.

They're just shooting themselves in the foot as usual, with their mindless short sighted approach.

Every young man should have a hobby: learning how to handle money is the best one. -- Jack Hurley

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