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Comment: Re:Seems like result would be higher price (Score 1) 85

by WillKemp (#45742989) Attached to: Govt. Watchdog Group Finds Apple Misled Aussies On Consumer Rights

Do you really have the ability to ask for a refund for a full two years?

You can ask for a refund for as long as seems reasonable. However, ultimately it comes down to what the adjudicator in your state or territory's fair trading tribunal thinks is reasonable - or, maybe, what you can convince the retailer they would find reasonable.

The amount of time that's reasonable would probably depend on the nature and price of the item. If it was something that should reasonably be expected to last, say, 5 years, you could possibly make a case for it to be replaced or refunded for up to that length of time. However, it's likely the tribunal would be less sympathetic to that as time goes on - although it may depend on how much you would be inconvenienced by repair.

With cheaper goods, it may come down to how much it will cost the retailer to defend themselves in the tribunal versus the cost of replacement or refund - particularly if you convince them you know your rights and will put up a good fight.

Comment: Re:Seems like result would be higher price (Score 1) 85

by WillKemp (#45742643) Attached to: Govt. Watchdog Group Finds Apple Misled Aussies On Consumer Rights

Australian law requires Apple to fix the issue. That can be done (A) by just giving you a brand new device while you are in the store, or (B) by having you send it out for repair and wait a week...

As a consumer I'd rather have (A) than (B). Making Apple have to support longer warranties out of the gate means that they would be more likely to do (B) [......]

Under Australian law, the consumer gets the choice - not Apple. You have the right to choose replacement, refund, or repair. Most retailers try and convince you that a faulty item must be repaired and they can't replace or refund - mentioning your state or territory's fair trading department usually changes their mind instantly.

Comment: Re:Seems like result would be higher price (Score 3, Informative) 85

by WillKemp (#45734521) Attached to: Govt. Watchdog Group Finds Apple Misled Aussies On Consumer Rights

The end effect I can see of countries forcing long warranties on products [......]

They're not forcing long warranties on products. The law merely requires that a good should be of merchantable quality and fit for purpose - anything else is essentially fraud anyway.

Another possibility is that Apple would become more stingy with repair/replacement, which would be a shame as it's really nice to go in and have them say "well, this just isn;t working, have a new one".

They're not being generous, it's what Australian law requires them to do.

Comment: Re: Greed! (Score 5, Insightful) 281

by WillKemp (#45406357) Attached to: Music Industry Issues Take Down Notices to 50 Major Lyrics Sites

Well we all know how much lyrics sites lead to a loss in sales for these companies.

Quite the opposite, i'd say. I've often heard a song i liked on the radio, but not known what it was called or who it was by, and then googled bits of lyrics to find out so i could buy it. And i'm sure i'm not the only person who does that. The Google search inevitably takes me to one of those lyrics sites. If they weren't there, chances are i wouldn't have bought the song.

They're just shooting themselves in the foot as usual, with their mindless short sighted approach.

Comment: Re:Puppet strings (Score 3, Interesting) 431

by WillKemp (#45266519) Attached to: UK Prime Minister Threatens To Block Further Snowden Revelations

Wonder how much pressure the PM is getting from Washington?

He doesn't need pressure. When their US masters give them orders they simply obey. They don't even question it. It's been that way for decades. All the bullshit whining about the EU taking away their sovereignty is just a smoke screen - the UK has had no sovereignty for a very long time. And, of course, one of the tasks their masters have set them is to disrupt the EU as much as possible (it's a threat to US economic dominance).

Comment: Re:wrong target (Score 5, Insightful) 431

by WillKemp (#45266485) Attached to: UK Prime Minister Threatens To Block Further Snowden Revelations

He is playing a game that has no winning moves.

True. But he's undoubtedly doing it under orders from his US masters - who don't care whether he gets re-elected or not. The UK has for a very long time now been a client kingdom of the US. One of their main roles on behalf of their masters is to disrupt the EU as much as possible, but they have to carry out other menial tasks too.

Comment: Re:I only go... (Score 1) 415

by WillKemp (#45140449) Attached to: I typically visit a doctor (for medical reasons) ...

So please, if not for you, for the sake of the people around you, get vaccinated.

For the sake of your shares in the pharmaceutical companies, you mean?

If i don't get a vaccine and everyone else does, how are they at risk from me? If they catch whatever they're vaccinated against from me, then the vaccine obviously doesn't work!

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