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Submission + - Wanted: ebola-proof suits and/or terrestrial robots 1

Will.Woodhull writes: An open letter to the greatest philanthropists of our time:

Ebola is going to be an increasingly important thing in our lives for at least a couple of decades. An infection with a +70% mortality rate that is on an exponential growth curve is not going to be contained and eradicated any time soon. We are going to live with it, and some of us are likely to die from it, for years to come

We need something similar to a spacesuit to replace the protective garments that care givers are currently wearing. The suit needs to be immune to agents that can be used to assure disinfection of all its exposed surfaces. For instance, the wearer might need to be able to walk through an intense microwave chamber, or a massive bon fire, and probably through fog chambers of antivirus chemicals without being affected, and without destroying the suit's re-useability. The suit would also need to provide a good interior environment, including cooling, sip tubes for hydration and feeding, etc. Last, it should be bullet proof, since in many environments where it would be used there would be persons who would be willing to kill for the apparent advantages the suit might seem to provide. Finally, it needs to be mass produced: everyone involved in healthcare delivery should have one at hand.

Any well built ebola proof suit is likely to be a good basis for designing a spacesuit. Even in the unlikely event that we find some way to get rid of ebola in the next few months, the work done on the ebola suit would be of benefit.

Would someone like Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, or Warren Buffet take this project on? We need these suits-- like literally yesterday when you think of the number of health care providers who have died from ebola, and some of those deaths have even been among persons who have the best possible gear now available, and the very best training in how to use it.

Comment Re:How many ways are there to do simple things? (Score 1) 694

You can get quite a difference in 'simple' classes. I remember on C++ class where everyone would have the assignment done in 1 or 2 pages but one person would do it in 5 or 6 pages. I think I only had one assignment that ran more than one page, and that included the comments. It was also a bad class since we really didn't do C++ in class, I know the other teachers didn't like how he did it either.

Comment Re:older developers... (Score 1) 742

That sounds like my experience with setting up SFTP:

Me: I want to create ftp accounts without creating them as user account for the console.

L1nux_M4st3r: Why would you ever want to do that, anyway?

Me: For the 9 out of 10 reasons I'd set up an FTP server.

L1nux_M4st3r: You can't do that. I can't think of one reason!

Me: That's it, I'm going back to windows.

L1nux_M4st3r: We didn't want your kind anyway. Go kiss Bill Gates for me, Micro$loth boy!

Indeed. The attitude and words "Why would you even want to do that?" are the most poisonous to the Linux community.

Comment Re:I like the idea (Score 1) 36

I've just had a look for what's around in the UK, and they look awesome, but the focus does seem to be on the community rather than the resources.

I'm not trying to devalue group participation at all, and I'm certainly considering going along to hang out with some like-minded people, it's just that last I checked you can't cut intricate patterns out of sheet steel using only community spirit!

We're here to give you a computer, not a religion. - attributed to Bob Pariseau, at the introduction of the Amiga