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Comment: Re:Well, duh (Score 1) 373

Stasis would only be necessary for the purposes of reducing energy consumption and preventing boredom, which would both be issues in a machine intelligence.

When can we get that? I'm bored now - speaking as an intelligent (biological) machine (my predilection for posting on /. not withstanding...)

Comment: Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (Score 1) 110

by fahrbot-bot (#48634979) Attached to: RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

The VISA Pay Wave doesn't have user challenge/response, it's simply a wireless magstripe.

Do you have a citation for that?

Sure, every TV commercial showing someone using Pay Wave - tap, (beep/flash), done. In addition, it's advertised as being faster than just swiping. Having to type in a PIN isn't faster. The US is supposed to move to Chip and PIN next year for CC - I think debit cards usually need a PIN already (not sure, I would *never* use a debit card). Often no signature/PIN is required for common purchases (like food) if under $50 - both CC and debit.

Comment: Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (Score 1) 110

by fahrbot-bot (#48631095) Attached to: RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

Yes, wireless connections to the card are a risk ... but that risk is minuscule in comparison to the risks associated with using the magstripe (vulnerable to skimming) instead of the chip (uses challenge and response). These days, if someone requires me to use magstripe, I look at the terminal extremely carefully before swiping.

The VISA Pay Wave doesn't have user challenge/response, it's simply a wireless magstripe. It's just a gimmick and really no faster than swiping the card. Skimming at a POS terminal - other than at a gas station or older ATM - is pretty rare (and/or ballsy) and I've personally never heard/read about it anywhere. I live in the US, so your mileage may vary elsewhere...

Comment: Re:Hope it works better then my wallet (Score 2) 110

by fahrbot-bot (#48626791) Attached to: RFID-Blocking Blazer and Jeans Could Stop Wireless Identity Theft

Passports are easy. Just microwave the thing. Fries the chip but looks normal. "I don't know why it doesn't work,officer."

Got my passport in 2006, don't think it has RFID. My VISA card does - or did until I centered a hole punch over the chip and whacked it with a hammer. That was strangely satisfying :-)

Comment: Re:I would love... (Score 1) 573

by fahrbot-bot (#48626647) Attached to: Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'

To hear Sony explain to its shareholders how spending tens of millions of dollars to produce and millions more to promote a movie that they now have no plans to release is a good thing.

I'm sure Sony has insurance for this sort of thing and will actually make more money from that than by releasing the movie.

Comment: Re:This again? (Score 1) 391

by fahrbot-bot (#48626341) Attached to: Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

So you won't mind the cable company injecting javascript to bombard you with adds _and what not_?

Cox already does this with their "browser alerts" by injecting HTML. Shows up with either HTTP or HTTPS - I had to block the source hosts at my router. Regardless of their intentions, this is, of course, unfriendly - to say the least.

Comment: This again? (Score 5, Interesting) 391

by fahrbot-bot (#48622681) Attached to: Google Proposes To Warn People About Non-SSL Web Sites

Currently only about 33% of websites use HTTPS, according to statistics gathered by the Trustworthy Internet Movement which monitors the way sites use more secure browsing technologies. In addition, since September Google has prioritised HTTPS sites in its search rankings.

Um... Secure != Trustworthy and, seriously, most web connections DO NOT NEED to be HTTPS.

Furthermore, I cannot filter HTTPS via my proxy filter (Proxomitron) to strip out annoying things, like the fucking Google sidebar and other forced "user experience" settings - which is why I use nosslsearch.google.com ...

Comment: Irony? (Score 1) 580

by fahrbot-bot (#48622231) Attached to: Top Five Theaters Won't Show "The Interview" Sony Cancels Release

So, protesting a fictional, comedic film about assassinating their leader, the "Guardians of Peace" hack the studio that produced the film and then threaten violence against theaters showing and people who might watch the film. Wow. (I guess that's in line with people who follow a certain "Religion of Peace" threatening violence against those who draw, even respectful, images of their prophet because it's against said religion.)

Narrow minded people thinking mindlessly...

Comment: Re:Long waits? (Score 1) 156

by fahrbot-bot (#48618661) Attached to: Small Bank In Kansas Creates the Bank Account of the Future

I always thought CC's were evil.

Debit cards are basically "checks" that clear immediately, (with some, supposed, safeguards), and so are good for people who have trouble managing their money and/or living within their means as the funds are withdrawn directly from their bank account. The downside is that the funds are withdrawn immediately directly from your bank account. If the funds are spent fraudulently, then you have to ask (beg) the bank for your money back and deal with any hassles about short funds, should your account be that close to the edge.

All these problems can be avoided by using a no-fee credit card and paying it off in full each month. (a) you get a one-month float on your funds, (b) your bank account is not directly attached to the card, (c) fraudulent purchases cab be disputed w/o have to first pay for them (assuming you don't use auto-pay) and (d) it helps your credit rating.

In short, if you have a no-fee CC and are responsible, there's no rational reason to ever have/use a Debit card. Especially as CC / Debit cards are both accepted in all the same places - CC might actually be accepted in more places.

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