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Comment: BeeB BeeB CeeB (Score 1) 80

by Whiteox (#49748663) Attached to: Take Two Sues BBC Over Drama About GTA Development

BBC have a bad attitude thinking that they are untouchable with a holier than thou perspective. They encroach on anyone and anywhere. They are banned some countries because of this. It's not only that. They try to compare some mythical 'pseudo-victorian' ethic, claiming that if it doesn't fit their world view then there is something wrong with it, sensationalizing these made up issues and forcing their own political correctness upon the hapless audience.
This GTA thingy is typical of their arrogance and I for one have a warm, glowing feeling about this action.

Comment: Re:$108,000 (Score 1) 64

by Whiteox (#49748285) Attached to: Australian ISP Offers Pro-bono Legal Advice To Accused Pirates

You are right - though in this court case, it's not the downloaders they are going after, but the uploaders. The ratio becomes immaterial as your bittorrent will seed as soon as you leech. Even though it may be 0.001% of the file, it is still regarded as seeding AND as it contributes towards the full 100% of the file, you are a 'sharer'.
So I give all of Slashdot (for free) this bit of knowledge:
http://www.bitthief.ethz.ch/
It's primitive but works as tested.
Also PLEASE look at this as a nerd solution to a technical problem, i.e. using torrents for downloading only.

Comment: Re:Camer was owned by the school (Score 1) 361

by Whiteox (#49747581) Attached to: Student Photographer Threatened With Suspension For Sports Photos

School property (like cameras/computers etc) are in use by students who in one way or another lease/rent the property as part of the school curriculumn. In some cases, additional fees are asked for by the school for certain subject resources (eg woodwork/cooking/art etc). As far as copyright is concerned, there needs to be specific written conditions on the use of school equipment. For example, are graphic arts product made on a computer by a student is the student's property because it is assessed as such.

Comment: $108,000 (Score 1) 64

by Whiteox (#49747231) Attached to: Australian ISP Offers Pro-bono Legal Advice To Accused Pirates

So there's more here: http://mashable.com/2015/05/20...
and here: http://www.itwire.com/your-it-...
For those in the TLR category, iiNET wants to charge DBC (Dallas Buyers Club LLC) $108,000 as expenses to filter and send customer info to them.
There is a distinction that fines >$10 are for those who uploaded (seeded), so the fines maybe a lot more than $10 which is a guess anyway. How iiNET or how the capturing method — using German Maverick Eye technology can determine accurately the uploads for each transgressor is questionable.
The court will review the initial letters to 'pirates' as speculative invoicing (per the USA) will not be tolerated. Also, settlement amounts will be based on personal circumstances of each uploader.
This is truly a test case and will propably open up VPN as a preferred solution for the short term.
Note the distinction between leechers and seeders. This is the first time in Australian law that the seeders are the bad guys. Leeching is ok as long as you don't seed. But how is that possible with Bittorrent? The moment you leech, you begin to seed anyway.

Comment: Re:North Pole (Score 1) 470

by Whiteox (#49741201) Attached to: The Brainteaser Elon Musk Asks New SpaceX Engineers

You're right. You don't need maths to solve this though. It's a thought riddle and makes some assumptions. so you ignore ice/ocean etc.
You walk South 1 mile.
Following your compass, traveling West, you're walking an arc exactly 1 mile radius from the North pole. The distance you walk West doesn't matter, you will always be 1 mile away from the pole. Now by turning North and walking 1 mile, you are back where you started.

Comment: Re:#define BITLEN 48 (Score 1) 203

by Whiteox (#49741073) Attached to: Australian Law Could Criminalize the Teaching of Encryption

You may not know the full story here and it would be laborious to explain it fully. However the costing of the original NBN was budgeted and the time line worked out. Delays came about because of the reluctance (politically motivated) by Telstra to sell their pipes to the NBN. That took around 2 years and many millions of dollars.
Now, FTTH (FTTP) has been degraded to FTTN (node) and copper wires from the node to the premises! WTF?
Here's an apt quote:
"Shadow communications minister Jason Clare used Mr Hackett's comments to attack the Coalition's policy.
"Malcolm Turnbull sacked the NBN Co board because they didn't agree with him," he said. "A year and half later, Turnbull's hand-picked replacement has come to the same conclusion - his second-rate copper NBN is a dud." http://www.smh.com.au/business...
Not only that, but a public infrastructure project run by the government is now in the hands of 3rd party developers using old (VDSL) technology.
So when sense finally comes, all that VDSL (which has to be separately powered on street corner fridge sized boxes) needs to be ripped out. More time wasted and less bandwidth for the next decade at least.
So much for the original vision of superfast connections to over 90% of the homes in Australia.
Now Turnbull is no chump. Maybe he was forced into an alternate version of the NBN by the Liberals and is pushing this ahead, against the advice of every tech head out there. He knows it's wrong but he has no choice but follow a damaged policy.

Comment: Re:Meanwhile, in Australia (Score 1) 42

by Whiteox (#49740949) Attached to: How 1990s Encryption Backdoors Put Today's Internet In Jeopardy

There has already been enough discussion about this in IT circles and more in the future. I bet that there will be a bill passed to clarify this.
Encryption/cryptography are not the sole property of the good good guys anyway. If someone builds a bigger wall, there's always someone else that can pull it down.

Comment: Re:#define BITLEN 48 (Score 1) 203

by Whiteox (#49734539) Attached to: Australian Law Could Criminalize the Teaching of Encryption

Yes, maybe Turnbull. His only problem is his hypocrisy where he invests his personal fortune in FTTH in France, but baulks on supporting the same infrastructure in Australia. What a waste of time and money the new NBN is when it'll all have to be ripped up and replaced with full fibre. I'll be non-compost menzies by then.
Gough was God in my time. He gave me a free education (which I repaid time over), fixed the health of the populace and did a lot of good deeds. Unfortunately he ran out of money.

Comment: Re:I would like to Apologise (Score 1) 203

by Whiteox (#49734347) Attached to: Australian Law Could Criminalize the Teaching of Encryption

On the other hand, we're just a bunch of gutless arseholes that just don't care. In the next election are we going to vote middle left or middle right? Same crap ALL THE TIME and we don't do anything about it.
And how the hell can Uber operate in Australia? WTF! No one is allowed to transport people for money except Taxis and bus drivers and that is highly regulated.
Maybe the AC is right. Another Eureka Stockade anyone?
As for the latest gov. blunder? Well it'll sort itself out. As one poster put it "This makes everyone guilty of something. Then governments can just prosecute anybody they don't like in a completely arbitrary fashion." (et.al.). Just another piece of shit we have to put up with emanating from the dickhead in charge who keeps claiming he has a 'mandate' to make any changes he gets told to do by incompetent cronies who have no clue about anything.

Some of my readers ask me what a "Serial Port" is. The answer is: I don't know. Is it some kind of wine you have with breakfast?

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