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Submission + - Electron Behavior Suggests Possible Structure (

pln2bz writes: Scientists are spinning the recent observation of electrons' inherent rotational properties in the absence of a magnetic field as a breakthrough towards the eventual creation of a quantum computer. That may be the case, but it's worth noting also the works of Wal Thornhill and Ralph Sansbury, who have suggested a theory that can explain gravity, magnetism and light on the basis of an internal structure for electrons, called subtrons. Their theory appears to predict these latest observations: "Simply stated, all subatomic particles, including the electron, are resonant systems of orbiting smaller electric charges of opposite polarity that sum to the charge on that particle. These smaller electric charges he calls 'subtrons.' ... In this model, the electron cannot be treated like a fundamental, point-like particle. It must have structure to have angular momentum and a preferred magnetic orientation, known vaguely as 'spin.' There must be orbital motion of subtrons within the electron to generate a magnetic dipole. The transfer of energy between the subtrons in their orbits within the classical electron radius must be resonant and near instantaneous for the electron to be a stable particle. The same argument applies to the proton, the neutron, and, as we shall see — the neutrino." If Thornhill and Sansbury are right, then the speed of subtrons would be on the order of 2.5 million light-years per second — so fast, in fact, that they could travel to the other side of Andromeda within just one second. Not only might this elegantly explain why many quantum effects appear to us as instantaneous, but their combined works also clarify some prior anti-gravity claims.

Submission + - Can Transhumanism Survive W/o Libertarianism? (

IConrad01 writes: "From Functionalism In Action: Can A Transhuman Future Survive Without Libertarian Ideals?:

As a transhumanist, I am all too keenly aware of the good and the ill that can come of technology. One technology, however, that seems to have only ills springing from it these days is that of surveillance technology. Consider, for example the perhaps not so infamous as it ought to be 'dragonfly spy':

This becomes all the more troublesome when we consider that — regardless of Ray Kurzweils's 'law' of accelarating returns — technological development is outstripping society's ability to regulate our machines. There's nothing really new about that idea — but still; it is strongly worth paying attention to when we consider the advocates of regulation for new, 'existentially risky' technologies — such as molecular manufacturing, or synthetic biology, or viral engineering, or... well, by now the point is clear.
Click the link to read the article in full."


Journal Journal: Adult Stem Cells By Catheter Heal Heart After Heart Attack

A team of cardiologists at the University Hospital of Navarre, in collaboration with the Area of Cell Therapy at the same centre, and with the Gregorio Marañón Hospital in Madrid, have carried out clinical trials (phase II) on 50 patients in order to test the efficacy of adult stem sell transplants (in this case, myoblasts), in the heart of persons who have suffered a myocardial attack. The great

Submission + - Parallellism, Math, and the Curse of the Algorithm (

An anonymous reader writes: From the article: Adding more processing cores to a CPU should have been a relatively painless evolution of computer technology but it turned out to be a real pain in the ass, programming wise. Why? To understand the problem, we must go back to the very beginning of the computer age, close to a hundred and fifty years ago, when an Englishman named Charles Babbage designed the world's first general purpose computer, the analytical engine.
User Journal

Journal Journal: 'We don't do open source because there's no one to sue' 1

Linux is carrying a detailed article regarding the security debate raging in corporations about using Open Source. One interesting quote: "We don't do open source because my lawyer says there's no one to sue," says Phil Maier, vice president of information security at Inovant, Visa's technology deployment division. "The lawyers had the final say." Maybe Shakespeare was right after all ....

Submission + - Ice Chunks Fall From Blue Skies (

wximagery95 writes: Some scientists believe that there is a larger, more sinister type of ice-chunk precipitation besides hail which can form outside of storms, making even the largest hailstones look puny in comparison. There is a great deal of disagreement in the scientific community regarding the origin of these falling slabs of ice, but it is certain that something is causing massive frozen chunks (weighing between 6 pounds to as much as 400 pounds) to occasionally drop from seemingly clear blue skies. The objects are called megacryometeors.

If these things are forming on, and then becoming dislodged from large aircraft, you would think there is the potential for a massive lawsuit should one of these ice chunks actually kill someone. Is the FAA and the airline industry really covering up the source of these ice chunks (AKA; megacryometeors)?

The Internet

Submission + - ISPs Blocking Bulk Solicited Email & Workaroun 1

moogle10000 writes: I've recently encountered an issue where large ISPs (such as AOL, Earthlink, Roadrunner, etc.) are blocking email coming from our private mail server. To rectify that, we enlisted the services of a mail security company — not only do they filter SPAM, but they also relay our outgoing mail so we can avoid the mass-block from the major ISPs. However, we send out a solicited mass emailing that is prohibited by the Terms of Service of our mail security company. What is a sysadmin to do? Should I simply send them direct and then hunt down each of the ISPs individually? The mass-blacklisting of mail servers seems to be a BIG problem for small businesses (big businesses are immune)... What do you think?

Submission + - Radioactive Boy Scout At It Again (

Whip-hero writes: "'Authorities were concerned he was trying to obtain a radioactive isotope from the smoke detectors... Authorities first learned of Hahn's obsession with radioactivity in 1994 after he told a health official that he hoped to earn an Eagle Scout badge by producing energy, according to an article in Harper's Magazine...'

Check out the story to see a picture of what I can only guess is some stage of radiation poisoning."


Submission + - Feds bust botnet boss (

coondoggie writes: "According to court documents, a California man this week was indicted on four counts of electronic transmission of codes to cause damage to protected computers. Greg King, also known as "Silenz, Silenz420, sZ, GregK, and Gregk707, " allegedly controlled over seven thousand such "bots" and used them to conduct multiple distributed denial of service attacks against websites of two businesse — CastleCops and KillaNet. The botnet attacks on KillaNet took place between July 2004 and February 2007 causing at least $5,000 in damage. KillaNet said on its Web site today that "King caused thousands of dollars in losses of time and content through many attacks against our webserver." In addition King allegedly taunted KillaNet in a series of emails during the attacks."

Submission + - UNIX V7 ported to i386 (

Seth Morabito writes: "Ever wanted to run the classic original AT&T UNIX V7, but just couldn't bring yourself to fire up that PDP-11 you have in your garage? Robert Nordier has recently announced a port of the V7 source to Intel. It supports ATA disks, ATAPI CD drives, 1.44M floppy disks, and standard PC serial ports. Robert describes the port as “stable and quite generally usable”. Fun for anyone wanting to play with a piece of UNIX history."

Hotels are tired of getting ripped off. I checked into a hotel and they had towels from my house. -- Mark Guido