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Comment Re:Everybody List What You Think Went Wrong (Score 0) 524 524

The editors ignored the pro-gamergate news, pro male news, but kept the healthy does of anti-gamergate news like the Wu around. Lets have more articles on harassment of women, how women have it tough in Amazon, how women are being ostracized in tech!

With a readership of mostly males interested in tech, they really did push a feminist liberal agenda over tech news. And look what it got them, most of the users left, the quality of news went down, and click bait appeared.

Comment Lets see (Score -1, Troll) 524 524

Killed off freshmeat, turned sourceforge into bigger pile of crap, slashdot is become a SJW haven for articles against men and hides articles for its corporate masters.

Did we hire gawker staff to run this place into the ground? I'd say get back to roots, and support your audience, but alas, appears to be a tad too late.

Shame, I remember when /. was at the heart of tech news, remember CPU magazine? So sad.

Comment Re:Morse Code (Score 1) 617 617

Oh, wait, you didn't need to pass a test for that.

I'm just trying to think how that would have been possible. I think back then there was a medical exception you could plead for. I didn't. I passed the 20 WPM test fair and square and got K6BP as a vanity call, long before there was any way to get that call without passing a 20 WPM test.

Unfortunately, ARRL did fight to keep those code speeds in place, and to keep code requirements, for the last several decades that I know of and probably continuously since 1936. Of course there was all of the regulation around incentive licensing, where code speeds were given a primary role. Just a few years ago, they sent Rod Stafford to the final IARU meeting on the code issue with one mission: preventing an international vote for removal of S25.5 . They lost.

I am not blaming this on ARRL staff and officers. Many of them have privately told me of their support, including some directors and their First VP, now SK. It's the membership that has been the problem.

I am having a lot of trouble believing the government agency and NGO thing, as well. I talked with some corporate emergency managers as part of my opposition to the encryption proceeding (we won that too, by the way, and I dragged an unwilling ARRL, who had said they would not comment, into the fight). Big hospitals, etc.

What I got from the corporate folks was that their management was resistant to using Radio Amateurs regardless of what the law was. Not that they were chomping at the bit waiting to be able to carry HIPAA-protected emergency information via encrypted Amateur radio. Indeed, if you read the encryption proceeding, public agencies and corporations hardly commented at all. That point was made very clearly in FCC's statement - the agencies that were theorized by Amateurs to want encryption didn't show any interest in the proceeding.

So, I am having trouble believing that the federal agency and NGO thing is real because of that.

Comment Re:Morse Code (Score 1) 617 617

The Technican Element 3 test wasn't more difficult than the Novice Element 1 and 2 together, so Technican became the lowest license class when they stopped having to take Element 1.

The change to 13 WPM was in 1936, and was specifically to reduce the number of Amateur applicants. It was 10 WPM before that. ARRL asked for 12.5 WPM in their filing, FCC rounded the number because they felt it would be difficult to set 12.5 on the Instructograph and other equipment available for code practice at the time.

It was meant to keep otherwise-worthy hams out of the hobby. And then we let that requirement keep going for 60 years.

The Indianapolis cop episode was back in 2009. It wasn't the first time we've had intruders, and won't be the last, and if you have to reach back that long for an example, the situation can't be that bad. It had nothing to do with code rules or NGOs getting their operators licenses.

A satphone is less expensive than a trained HF operator. Iridium costs $30 per month and $0.89 per minute to call another Iridium phone. That's the over-the-counter rate. Government agencies get a better rate than that. And the phone costs $1100, again that's retail not the government rate, less than an HF rig with antenna and tower will cost any public agency to install.

You think it's a big deal to lobby against paid operators because there will be objections? How difficult do you think it was to reform the code regulations? Don't you think there were lots of opposing comments?

And you don't care about young people getting into Amateur Radio. That's non-survival thinking.

Fortunately, when the real hams go to get something done, folks like you aren't hard to fight, because you don't really do much other than whine and send in the occassional FCC comment. Do you know I even spoke in Iceland when I was lobbying against the code rules? Their IARU vote had the same power as that of the U.S., and half of the hams in the country came to see me. That's how you make real change.

Comment Re:wrong answer (Score 3, Insightful) 551 551

That was expected, "if you are not for us, you are against us" would be her answer.

She was unknown to me before gamergate, and now the only thing I ever see from her is hate speech against men. Her toxic views of male gamers appear on video game sites as fact. Her views of video game design as being misogynistic is being promoted as fact.

Her video games reviews are only about sexism, leaving off what games are really about, gameplay, interaction, puzzles, design, ingenuity.

Shes a one sided hate parrot, and I really cant condone her viewpoints or actions. The professional victim act gets old.

Comment Re:"Automatic" Weapon? (Score 1) 312 312

It is illegal to construct or possess a gun that is "readily convertible" into an automatic (more than one round per trigger pull); any such device is classified as an NFA weapon (machine gun). A common example is a rifle that can, with only a small amount of milling or other work, accept an autosear.

This is untrue. An AR-15 can be made to fire more than one round simply by removing (or incorrectly installing) a very tiny spring. An AK-style rifle can be made full auto by removing a small amount of metal in the right place, no other parts needed. And an SKS can be made to empty its magazine without any trigger pull whatsoever by simply jamming one piece of its mechanism into a certain position with a tiny wad of paper or something. Those are just three examples.

So then, I could legally have in my possession an AR-15, an AKM, and an SKS. Right next to those rifles I could have a pair of wire cutters, and small file, and a scrap of paper. I would not be breaking the law.

The thing you're likely thinking of is called "constructive intent". If I have all of the above in my possession with the intent of violating the NFA, then I'm breaking the law. Of course, it's up to the BATFE to decide if my intent was worthy of charging me with a crime, and then the court to decide if that crime was committed.

-B

Comment Re:GnuTLS (Score 1) 250 250

OpenSSL has first-to-market advantage, and anyone who hasn't evaluated the quality differences will choose the simpler license. Plus there are other alternatives, like Amazon's new SSL-in-5000-lines which is also gift-licensed.

The time for OpenSSL to dual-license was when it was the only available alternative to entirely proprietary implementations. That might indeed have funded a quality improvement.

I don't know a thing about the quality of GnuTLS or the Amazon thing. I've seen enough of the insides of OpenSSL to know it's not pretty, but am not a crypto guy and this don't work on it.

Comment Re:Few people understand the economics (Score 1) 250 250

Maintaining FIPS compliance did not make anything easier. It's essentially a prohibition on bug repair, as you have to recertify afterward. But the people who wanted FIPS were the only ones who were actually paying for someone to work on OpenSSL.

I don't think any of the other Free Software projects ever tried to be FIPS certified.

Comment Re:Lawsuits and licenses are not the problem (Score 1) 250 250

If you are one of the infringed parties, I'd be happy to talk with you about what your options are. bruce at perens dot com or +1 510-4PERENS (I'm not there today, but it will take a message). I am not a lawyer but I work with the good ones and can bring them into the conversation if necessary.

Brain damage is all in your head. -- Karl Lehenbauer

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