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Submission + - Google Chrome Was 'Hackable' At Pwn2Own Contest (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: "Although Google's Chrome was the only browser left standing after March's Pwn2Own hacking contest, it was vulnerable to the same bug used to bring down Apple's Safari, Google acknowledged this week. Google patched the Chrome vulnerability May 7, but it waited until last Wednesday to reveal that the bug was the same WebKit flaw that Apple patched the day before. '[We are] disclosing that this release contains the fix for CVE-2009-0945, an issue in WebKit code that also affects Apple's Safari,' Mark Larson, the program manager for Chrome, said in a May 13 post. 'We did not want to disclose this until Apple's fix for Safari users was released.' Apple patched the WebKit vulnerability Tuesday as part of a massive security update."

Submission + - City 2.0: Tech Building Blocks Make Utopian Future (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: "Sci-Fi writers call it Utopia, the glorious City of the Future. But short of downtown atriums being guarded by invisible walls and flying cars, City 2.0 is not as far off as you may think, writes John Brandon. Ubiquitous wireless networks are already available in Baltimore and Minneapolis, Thomson Reuters has sustainable data centers that sell power back to the local utility, the smart energy grid is well on its way, and city-provided social networks are common. While the concept of City 2.0 is monumental, the above these key technology advancements are already helping pave the road to the next-generation city. The next steps toward the city of tomorrow are all about integrating these services cohesively, making them widely available across the entire metropolis and managing the services more efficiently. 'The reality is that the city of the future will likely have many aspects of a contained and managed ecosystem,' says analyst Rob Enderle."

Real programs don't eat cache.