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Comment Re:Freakin' Riders. (Score 2) 767

In this case it is doubly stupid since CFLs save you money as well...

Not always. I have some fixtures in my house that if I put a CFL in it will burn out in a week or two, but putting a good old incandescent bulb in there will last a year or two. That light is used for about 5 minutes a day, so I save a lot of money by putting in incandescents. Just because on paper something can save you money, doesn't mean that in practice it does. Those figures are from perfect condition labs, not how people actually use them.

Comment Re:Aren't they clearly labeled? (Score 1) 348

The red light cameras are not always clearly marked. Some of them near me have signs for it, but others don't have a sign at all.
And your assertion that you haven't had problems with them since you don't run red lights is ridiculous. I don't run red lights either and I have had them take pictures of me when I was the first car in the line and I didn't clear the intersection before it turned red (I was paying attention and started into the intersection immediately after it turned green). I know of one that takes a picture of every vehicle turning left (been doing that for about 5 years now). There are times/places where it is impossible to not get hit by the red light cameras without knowing the flawed ones.

Comment Re:Why fine them? (Score 1) 86

The reason Sony is being fined is because of how their security was implemented. The other companies had actual security in place. Sony's security was the equivalent of a sign on the data saying "Please don't take this". The ICO knows that no security is 100% safe, but expects companies to at least attempt to keep data safe (which Sony did not do in this case). Sony also had every single one of its divisions customer data hacked.

They also offered free identity protection to ALL OF THEIR CUSTOMERS, for free.

I never got an offer of free identity protection when my data was stolen. The emails I got from them basically said "By the way, you may want to keep an eye out for identity theft". My data wasn't stolen through the PSN, but through the online MMO games portion.

Comment Re:Actually it does. (Score 1) 183

As it renders the virus useless.

No it doesn't. Viruses take advantage of a vulnerability to infect a system. Once it is on the system it doesn't use the vulnerability anymore.

Obligatory car analogy: You got a nail through a tire on your car. To take care of it you just don't drive on the road with nails on it where you got the first one. This doesn't fix it as the nail is still there making the tire deflate.

Comment Re:Yawn (Score 1) 357

Mistake #1: He compares it to 32 GB iPad, yet fails to mention that Windows and Office alone eat up about 12GB. So in reality, Surface is 20 GB and not 32.

Obvious shill is obvious.

And if he compared it to the 16GB iPad that would not have been a fair comparison because the Surface has a lot more storage. The 32GB iPad does not have 32GB of usable storage either. 32GB iPad to 32GB Surface is the closest to a fair comparison.

Comment Re:Not unexpected (Score 1) 241

Except you don't need to overhaul everything to IPv6. You can run a local IPv4 intranet for the legacy systems and only connect to the public internet on IPv6. Of course this requires every web facing server to have IPv6, which still needs a lot of work.

Neckties strangle clear thinking. -- Lin Yutang