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Which Android Devices Sacrifice Battery-Life For Performance? 108

Posted by Soulskill
from the definitely-mine dept.
MojoKid writes: A couple of weeks ago, Futuremark began handing out copies of PCMark for Android to members of the press, in an effort to get its leaderboards filled while the finishing touches were being put on the app. That might give you pause in that the results, generated today, are not going to be entirely accurate when the final version comes out, but that's not the case. Futuremark has encouraged publication of results generated with the benchmark. What makes PCMark for Android useful benchmark is that it not only tests for performance, but also for battery-life and performance combined. As such, you can easily figure out which devices sacrifice battery-life for performance and which ones have a good blend of both. The HTC One M8 really stands out, thanks to its nearly balanced performance/battery-life ratio. A result like that might make you think that neither value could be that great, but that's not the case at all. In fact, the battery-life rating on that phone places far beyond some of the other models, only falling short to the OnePlus One. And speaking of that phone, it becomes obvious with PCMark why it's so hyped-up of late; it not only delivers solid performance, it boasts great battery-life as well.

Comment: Re:Who is a "casual" gamer anyways? (Score 1) 132

by Voltage Spike (#41383951) Attached to: Can Nintendo Court the Casuals Again?

A little late to the party, but...

Hardcore applies to gamers where the buyer wants a specific product. It doesn't matter how good, or unique, or complex the game happens to be; the key factor is that the customer watches the trailers online, pre-orders, and pays $60.

Casual gamers play something to pass the time. They don't really care what game they are playing as long as it isn't overly involved or boring. When given the choice between two games with a high price disparity, they will buy the cheaper game.

Casual gamers are great because the population is greater and they require a lower up-front investment. On the other hand, the profit margins are lower and chance of significant sales tends to be low.

Comment: Re:Slightly Sensational (Score 1) 434

by Voltage Spike (#38444378) Attached to: Apple Patents Using Apps During Calls

Where was that in the patent? I saw icon replacement and switching but not displaying an application list alongside call controls:

Sorry, you are correct. I was looking for differences between Claim 1 and Claim 19 and got lost in the language (the apparent difference being that 1 is the method and 19 is the interface for doing so). The reading of these things is almost painful. Does the patent office really require that you explain how a computer works and cross-reference every major wireless and communication protocol to describe a UI feature, or does it simply help to "bury the headline" thus increasing the chances of approval?

Comment: Slightly Sensational (Score 3, Interesting) 434

by Voltage Spike (#38442898) Attached to: Apple Patents Using Apps During Calls

This patent covers two items that I am not familiar with today.

1) The application list is displayed alongside the call controls so that you have immediate access to call functions while browsing applications.

2) Applications become call-aware and offer a button to change back to the "phone application" somewhere in the interface.

Android doesn't implement these features, and they are not entirely desirable anyway. I'd much rather have a single interface to accessing applications (hit the home button and then use the shortcut I'm familiar with), and I prefer to have a link to the phone call in the notifications where it is always available.

So a little sensational, but the patent doesn't cover ground-shaking ideas.

Comment: Re:Its all about the latency... (Score 1) 143

by Voltage Spike (#37560480) Attached to: Rob Malda Casts a Jaded Eye at Amazon's Silk

I was going to suggest that you check out SPDY as another approach for improving latency of deeply-nested content, but it turns out that Amazon Silk actually uses the protocol in addition to any "cloud rendering" they have in the background.

I would have thought that high latency cell connections would have pushed us toward a pre-loading, single connection approach already, but apparently it's difficult to get the entire Internet to change...

Comment: It Has Been Done (Score 1) 838

by Voltage Spike (#11403285) Attached to: Are Extensible Programming Languages Coming?

I have seen code like this: XTML.

Although the primary idea is that you write all of your call logic with a commercial GUI, the underlying "code" is Turing-complete XML. I find viewing the XML a painful and dizzying experience, but the XTML-specific GUI actually presents a decent view of the logic.

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