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Comment: Re:NIH syndrome (Score 1) 334

Remember, the government has been using document-oriented NoSQL databases for some 40 to 50 years with MUMPS, the database in VistA, the Veterans Administration EMR. NoSQL databases have been a go-to technology solution for government healthcare projects for decades.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumps [wikipedia.org]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VistA [wikipedia.org]

Comment: Re:MarkLogic's Pitch (Score 1) 334

Remember, the government has been using document-oriented MUMPS databases for some 40 to 50 years in VistA, the Veterans Administration EMR. NoSQL databases have been a go-to technology for government healthcare applications for decades.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumps
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VistA


The problem, of course, being that MUMPS has some serious flaws with regard to it's integrated language M, and they don't want to *actually* use MUMPS for any new projects. What they were doing was betting on a NoSQL technologies to replace MUMPS. They were hoping to find something that had all the benefits of MUMPS, but not the drawbacks and problems. Unfortunately, XML was probably not the answer.

I'm keeping my fingers crossed that JSON and MongoDB will be the eventual successors of MUMPS.

Comment: Re:MarkLogic is an XML repository, not a RDBMS (Score 1) 334

Remember, the government has been using document-oriented MUMPS databases for some 40 to 50 years in VistA, the Veterans Administration EMR. NoSQL databases have been a go-to technology for government healthcare applications for decades.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumps
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VistA

Comment: Re:follow the money (Score 1) 334

Actually, the government has been using document-oriented NoSQL databases for some 40 to 50 years with MUMPS, the database in VistA, the Veterans Administration EMR. The US has been running NoSQL MUMPS healthcare systems for 40 years for the US Military.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumps
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VistA

Comment: Re: follow the money (Score 1) 334

Hey, now. :)
Don't be hating on MongoDB. It's actually got all the good points of MUMPS, without any of the baggage. It's liable to be a big hit in healthcare and EMR systems in the future. Remember, the government has been using document-oriented NoSQL databases for some 40 to 50 years in VistA, the Veterans Administration EMR. They've been running NoSQL MUMPS systems for 40 years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumps
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VistA

Comment: Re:Blow to NoSQL movement (Score 1) 334

Actually, the government has been using document-oriented NoSQL databases for some 40 to 50 years in government run EMR systems, by way of MUMPS. Specifically, check out VistA which is run by the Veterans Administration, and is considered by many to be the largest and oldest healthcare network in the US.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumps
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VistA

Comment: Re:God Help Us. (Score 1) 354

I think there's a good chance it will. Just remember that Javascript is based on Actionscript, based on Scheme, based on Lisp. It's actually got a a much better pedigree than most people realize. It implements the lambda calculus wherever there is a web browser. That's pretty much exactly what it needs to do to 'win the wars'. Be ubiquitous and support the lambda calculus. Everything else is just syntax.

Comment: Re:Javascript anywhere but the browser? No (Score 1) 354

Some people like riding a chopper. :)

In all seriousness, this is an insightful comment. I tend to make the analogy that LAMP stacks are like prop propeller airplanes, whereas Javascript/Mongo frameworks (like Meteor) are akin to Jet Turbines. If you want to break the sound barrier, a propeller airplane simply won't do the job. But a jet can.

Comment: Re:Javascript anywhere but the browser? No (Score 1) 354

Overrated. Most use cases don't need proper relational theory. Convergence to consistency is sufficient for most people's needs. Denormalized DRY data is less important now that memory is plentiful. Speaking as somebody who was an SQL admin for 10+ years, and am happy to have made the leap to Map/Reduce and won't ever be looking back.

If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

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