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Comment: much more time to be spent on req spec (Score 2) 403

by Vo1t (#40030367) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is Outsourcing Development a Good Idea?
Outsourcing doesnt have to be to a foreign country, it happens all the time. There are organizations with big IT departments that choose to pay outside company to do the work. Is that a good idea? It depends, as with everything. You have to realize that you will spend much more time on specifying and verifying the implementation of requirements, interfaces, etc. than if the developers were in-house. If you don't do that then you're going to fail. This increase of specification cost, is due to communication problems with external parties. If you are prepared to stop coding and start managing - why not go for it. Just be careful and precise with requirements, including non-functional ones (performance, etc.). Always mention that you won't pay if it doesnt adhere to the spec and good practices. If you are going to own their code later on, you should also enforce some standards, frameworks used, etc... You do see where I'm going? You can outsource the grunt work, not the thinking.

Comment: Re:We are the borg ...... (Score 1) 121

this is not true, read "Thinking Fast and Slow" by Kahneman. There are experiments that show that quality of human thinking degrades very quickly when multitasking. Therefore some system that can detect such situation would be very good for activities that require long attention span and are prone to interruptions.
Science

+ - German researchers conclude that ADHD is over-diagnosed, especially in males | P->

Submitted by ericjones12398
ericjones12398 (2604021) writes "Researchers at Ruhr-University Bochum in Germany have concluded that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is over-diagnosed based on the results of a new study. They surveyed a total of 1,000 child and adolescent psychotherapists and psychiatrists across Germany, with 473 ultimately participating."
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IBM

+ - IBM building exascale computer for the Square Kilometre Array telescope->

Submitted by
MrSeb
MrSeb writes "IBM and ASTRON, the Netherlands Foundation for Research in Astronomy, have announced that they have begun work on building an exascale supercomputer that, come 2024, will collect data from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a 3,000km-wide telescope that will have "millions of antennae". The current world’s fastest supercomputer, the K, has 700,000 processor cores and a peak performance of 10 petaflops — an exascale (exaflop) computer would be 100 times faster than that. The SKA is anticipated to produce a few exabytes of data per day, which will then be processed by the IBM supercomputer to produce between 300 and 1,500 petabytes of stored data per year. To put this into perspective, the web’s daily traffic — i.e. two billion people surfing the web — currently adds up to "only" half an exabyte. The Large Hadron Collider currently produces 15 petabytes of data per year. IBM and Astron will be chasing exascale computing through technologies such as phase-change memory and photonics, and chip stacking. The 3,000km-wide telescope will be networked together using more than 80,000km of fiber optics. The telescope itself will be tasked with studying the origins of the universe, performing extreme tests on Einstein’s theory of general relativity, investigating dark matter, and more."
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+ - Ask Slashdot: How do you go about testing a storage medium?

Submitted by g7a
g7a (2524976) writes "I've been given the task of testing new hardware for the use in our servers. For things like memory I can run it through things such as memtest for a few day's to ascertain if there are any issues with the new memory. However i've hit a bit of a brick wall when it comes to testing hard disks there seems to be no definitive method for doing so. Aside from the obvious S.M.A.R.T tests ( i.e. long offline ) are there any systems out there for testing hard disks to a similar level to that of memtest or any tried and tested methods for testing storage media ?"
Open Source

Big Data's Invisible Open Source Community 49

Posted by samzenpus
from the always-the-bridesmaid dept.
itwbennett writes "Hadoop, Hive, Lucene, and Solr are all open source projects, but if you were expecting the floors of the Strata Conference to be packed with intense, boostrapping hackers you'd be sorely disappointed. Instead, says Brian Proffitt, 'community' where Big Data is concerned is 'acknowledged as a corporate resource', something companies need to contribute back to. 'There is no sense of the grass-roots, hacker-dominated communities that were so much a part of the Linux community's DNA,' says Proffitt."

Comment: Analytic Hierarchy Process (Score 3, Insightful) 304

by Vo1t (#39100255) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Do You Deal With Priorities Inflation In IT Projects?
Try Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). It's very well described in reference to software development in "Lean Software Strategies" book (which I recommend btw).

Basically you dont rank priorities of projects/tasks not on absolute scale, but on relative scale (project A vs project B, etc.) based on gut feelings, discussions with stakeholders, CFOs, etc. You end up with a matrix you have to solve to get normalized new absolute weights of each project/task.

I had the opportunity to use it once for new project kick off, I liked it and will use this method in the future. The book presents this method in context of other case studies, and it certainly has been used in many other situations.
Intel

+ - Intel Unveils 22nm 3D Tri-gate (add. coverage)->

Submitted by
MojoKid
MojoKid writes "Intel announced a major technology advancement today in a move that fundamentally changes how the company will build processors and other devices in the years to come. Intel is adopting what it calls Tri-Gate (3D) transistors. What Intel has done is develop a 3D gate structure that creates a fin of substrate material through which the gate passes. This actually increases the size of the inversion layer (allowing for higher drive current) but minimizes the power lost to leakage. Intel's diagrams indicate that the company is moving to SOI as well. Ivy Bridge-based Intel Core family processors will be the first high-volume chips to use 3-D Tri-Gate transistors. Ivy Bridge is slated for high-volume production readiness by the end of this year."
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It's funny.  Laugh.

Forging a Head: The Upside of Scientific Hoaxes 201

Posted by timothy
from the may-I-interest-you-in-some-goat-organs? dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In a very funny piece over at Science Careers (published by the journal Science), scientist-comedian Adam Ruben suggests that a lot of good can come from a well-intentioned hoax. 'Hoaxes have infiltrated science for centuries,' Ruben writes, 'from fake fossils (Piltdown Man, archaeoraptor, Calaveras skull) to fake medical conditions (cello scrotum, the disappearing blonde gene) to fake animals (Ompax spatuloides, Pacific Northwest tree octopus, Labradoodle).' In contrast to fraud, Ruben argues, such hoaxes do a great service to science by illustrating 'failures of our most important tool: our skepticism.'"

Comment: get away from CMM if you can (Score 2, Informative) 200

by Vo1t (#34356702) Attached to: What Software Specification Tools Do You Use?
Let me recommend a book : "Lean Software Strategies: Proven Techniques for Managers and Developers". It containes throrough analysis of craft, mass and lean production strategies and their reflections in software (CMM being on the mass side = already obsolete approach). If you can't abandon CMM because of market conditions, think about embracing CMM with as much lean as possible as Peter Middleton describes, and find auditors who would understand and allow you advance on CMM scale without sacrificing productivity and adding waste to your process. In terms of tools, good issue tracking system with customizable workflows is what I recommend.

+ - China is cheating->

Submitted by crimeandpunishment
crimeandpunishment (1754306) writes "If a lazy college student gets caught using a ghost-written or plagiarized paper, he might fail the course. But if a college professor or researcher gets caught doing it, it could have far-reaching implications. That's what could happen in China....where academic cheating is so widespread, it could seriously impact China's goal of world leadership in science."
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