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Comment Re:I know what a siphon is! (Score 1) 565

Yes, really.

Siphoning is the act of using a tube with different levels of pressure at each end to transfer a liquid from one end to the other. Using atmospheric pressure or different elevations is just one method of siphoning.

The greater level of water pressure at the bottom will push the oil (mixed with water) up to the lower level of pressure at the top of the box/tube contraption, where it will be whisked away in a controlled fashion (rather than dispersing into the Gulf).

It's much like sucking water out of a glass with a straw. The greater pressure from the water at the bottom of the glass pushes the water up the straw to the lower level of pressure inside your mouth. This is also siphoning.

Comment Re:Can it run adblock, flashblock and noscript? (Score 1) 385

My point is simply that Google is pimping Chrome partly based on its JavaScript performance, without concern for whether JavaScript is good or bad. By that metric alone the more JavaScript you encounter, the better Chrome looks.

But NoScript's philosophy is pretty much the opposite: "JavaScript sucks out loud because it's primarily used by advertisers to annoy you, marketers to track you, and spammers to XSS redirect you to corrupted web sites where they'll install drive-by botnet installers; but we'll still let you run it easily if you say you need it."

Comment Re:Duh (Score 5, Insightful) 561

One question that the article does not pose (and can't answer due to its nature) is which is cause and which is effect. Is the reason that smokers have a lower IQ that the people that start smoking have a lower IQ, or does smoking damage your ability to reason logically?

Actually it can answer it. The study looked at two groups: fresh recruits and vets. We can assume an age difference of at least a few years between them, and the recruits are likely to be young enough that they've only been smoking for a couple of years on average. Therefore if the smoking were causing damage, we'd expect the recruits to show a less pronounced effect than the vets. As the article mentions no difference between the two groups, we can assume no significant such difference exists, and therefore (at least) no evidence for the latter proposition, and potentially evidence against it.

Comment Re:Bullshit (Score 1) 479

Now, if there was only a party in the United States that was actually moderate. Rather than a Crazy Liberal/Neo-Con masquerading as one.

In the US, you've never even SEEN a real liberal. Even the avowed communists are fairly moderate in the US...

Comment Re:So claim to be a... (Score 1) 348

I don't particularly disagree with you, but I see this bit a lot, and it's irritating:

"I hate you because its a sin, and you're weird, and you're different...and I'm kinda attracted to you, which make me question my sexual identity, and it PISSES ME OFF!".

Is tired, old, and ridiculous. Most homophobes aren't fighting secret gay urges, any more than racists secretly love the race they claim to hate.

Comment Re:Display models? (Score 1) 447

No, even then they wouldn't need to package a fan itself. If the boxes just go up for display and don't need to carry any actual inherent value, then just empty boxes would suffice. They could cover over the viewing ports for the CPU and fan with pictures of the CPU and fan and it would work perfectly for a "display model" box. If they needed a demo CPU to pass around but not actually function, then they should have oodles of defective parts to serve that function.

Comment Re:Evolution (Score 1) 447

"Work for hire" is not just something that goes in a contract. It is a legal term with relatively well legislated definitions. When someone pays you to write code for them, it is a work for hire. The reason this term is often used in contracts is because otherwise there can be some dispute later over whether the terms of the agreement were outside the scope of the legal definition, while if you explicitly say "this is a work for hire" then there's no room to argue.

Comment Yes... well almost... (Score 2, Informative) 605

Developers have near admin privileges. Everything is locked down via GPO, and developers are in our own OU.
We are admins on Development and Production servers so that can we handle application deployment, maintenance etc.

There are still some functions that we don't have access to, things like the virus scan, HIPS, Desktop validator, Smart card interface etc.

We can install/uninstall applications etc, but there is a finite list of software we can use, and if we get caught with unapproved software on a computer on the network, we will have a lot of explaining to do... to people with sidearms.

Comment Re:Just for fun (Score 4, Informative) 242

No, you are wrong.

They are trying to weasel around the injuction by doing what you describe NOW, but originally they were selling PC's with OSX pre-installed. That means that Pystar was doing the illegal modification and re-distribution. The RebelEFI product they came out with recently is an attempt to shift the burden of legal responsibility to their customers.

The legal status of RebelEFI was not decided explicitly by the courts injunction, but the Judge indicated that he doubted it would be exempt from the degree, and that Pystar proceeded with its sale at its own peril. That is because selling tools to circumvent DRM is as illegal as doing the circumvention yourself. That the RebelEFI is reported by some to be ripped off work from the Hackintosh community just makes Pystar that much more reprehensible IMO. Many can get behind the idea of "Screw the Man", but they appear to be trying to "Screw the Masses" as well.

"Everybody is talking about the weather but nobody does anything about it." -- Mark Twain