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Comment: Re:Oh really? (Score 1, Interesting) 190

I'd be amazed if it was.
My experience is that OpenOffice has less features but they work better. They (OO) also seem to be to be more interested in MS compatibility than LO is. I find that particular fork rather regrettable but Oracle would never have divested themselves of OpenOffice if they had not seen themselves becoming irrelevant.

Comment: Re:Not just China (Score 2) 92

by Vlad_the_Inhaler (#47683841) Attached to: Apple Begins Storing Chinese User Data On Servers In China

It looks to be an obvious move.
Accept that various agencies in various countries are trawling for data. Storing data locally minimises the number of agencies which have access to that data. Once the Snowden revalations became public, keeping data within national boundaries became a selling point for (not just) ISPs in most countries. I suppose I was ahead of the curve, I avoided Cloud services for just that reason - and then suspicions were confirmed.

When the Chinese Government request (or demand) that users' data remain within the country it is more about keeping things away from the NSA than making sure they themselves have access to it. I can imagine that users in that country share some of those concerns, they certainly do in Germany.

Comment: Re:Chess (Score 1) 274

by DudeTheMath (#47679205) Attached to: Of the following, I'd rather play ...

I played a lot of bridge in college & grad school, but then only read about clubs playing in the middle of the day. Just six weeks ago, I found a local club that has evening games, and I'm getting back into the groove after two decades of playing only bad contract bridge every other year when Christmas was at my parents' house.

Check for local bridge clubs where you are; they love to have younger players, and most are happy to accommodate singletons until they find a regular partner.

Comment: Re:Very disappointing. (Score 1) 93

by Whiney Mac Fanboy (#47596405) Attached to: Apple $450 Million e-Book Settlement Wins Court Approval

and they were filed because Amazon pays a hell of a lot more bribe money in Washington than Apple ever will.

It is unclear what you mean by 'bribe' money, but both Amazon and Apple spent huge sums of money lobbying over the last 15 years or so.

Amazon spends more, but not 'a hell of a lot' more. Both organisations do their absolute best to influence policy in their favour. The idea that Apple is somehow pure in this way is fantasy that could only come from the most delusional fanboy.

Comment: Re:Density (Score 2) 78

by DudeTheMath (#47516917) Attached to: Researchers Print Electronic Memory On Paper

Yeah, I was bothered by that, too. 8.5x11 paper is 603.22 cm^2, so we can fit roughly 6032200 100 micron^2 on the sheet, or about 736KB. Now, if it's really 75 microns on a side, the density goes up by 16/9 to 1309KB. Maybe they're leaving a margin? TFA gives the "100 micron" and "1MB" values, so it's not the poster but probably the reporter who made the mistake.

Comment: Re: Murphy says no. (Score 1) 265

by Vlad_the_Inhaler (#47432651) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Unattended Maintenance Windows?

I have no idea if once a week is realistic, it sounds far too high. I have around 5-10 such windows a year, some are stuff I can do from home (with support from the guys on shift) and some entail me being physically there, so there have been none of the second kind this year.
Major Outages of one of our production systems have been featured on national news and Slashdot before, although it requires an outage of several hours to cross that threshold. Our windows are at around 02:00 to 03:00 depending on which system is affected.

Murphy has really bitten us in the ass a few times:

  • Someone making an update (on a test system) which meant that the system did not come up properly after the next reboot which was days later. The symptoms made it look as though the test "window update" caused the problems. It was an accident but very annoying.
  • A weird error on one switchable hardware unit rendered it unusable on our main production system. That unit was one of 32 and the allocation system automatically only used it on other machines, the next reboot would have cleared the problem anyway. Someone decided to use *that* unit for a critical update and brought it up manually for that purpose. The update failed and our main system was down. I drove in at 03:30 and (I thought) fixed things by falling back. Shortly after I left again, one application stopped working and dragged the rest down with it. I went back in again and did the original update cleanly - over initial management objections - after which things were fine.

There have been others but they were even more arcane. The absolute worst cases we had were with virtually everyone there. They made the news, two of them made it to Slashdot. Different causes in each case.

Comment: Re:Little Snitch (Score 1) 349

by Whiney Mac Fanboy (#47373595) Attached to: Bug In Fire TV Screensaver Tears Through 250 GB Data Cap

The trick is that you use the Mac as a proxy, so all traffic from the device goes through the Mac

The real trick would be to put your unix-like box behind your gateway, routing all traffic through it. This has the massive advantage of not requiring you to go around, reconfiguring all suspect devices to use a proxy server (if they even can).

I assume this is possible with a mac, its certainly relatively easy to do with linux.

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