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Comment: Re:Music 60 years from now... (Score 1) 1115

by Vincman (#32873030) Attached to: Has Any Creative Work Failed Because of Piracy?

To that end, what do you think a Lady Gaga CD will go for in (roughly) 2070, do you think? More importantly, how widely do you think her songs would be played by then? Would anyone still alive then even know or care who she was? That my friend is the big metric of success or failure concerning creative works.

You're assuming that a CD will go for anything in 2070. Current trends seem to suggest that the future price of music is 0$.

Comment: Re:PowerPC? (Score 1) 396

by Vincman (#25344311) Attached to: Open Office Plans To Party Like It's Version 3.0

The PPC version is hidden away with one of the openoffice "Projects" -- click on the projects tab, and then you're on your own, but eventually you get to an ftp site. I've found it to be very stable in light use (I mostly use the Linux version).

can you be more specific than "and then you're on your own?" I can't find it.

Enlightenment

+ - Dutch students develop powdered alcohol

Submitted by adm1329
adm1329 (830856) writes "Dutch students have developed powdered alcohol which they say can be sold legally to minors.
The latest innovation in inebriation, called Booz2Go, is available in 20-gramme packets that cost 1-1.5 euros (NZ$1.80-2.70).Top it up with water and you have a bubbly, lime-coloured and -flavoured drink with just 3 per cent alcohol content. It makes you wonder if this will give a new meaning to "dry" communities.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/4086915a4560.html"
Portables

+ - Asus stuns Computex with £100 laptop->

Submitted by srinravi
srinravi (789262) writes "According to linuxdevices.com, Asus chairman Jonney Shih sprang a surprise during Intel's Computex keynote today with the announcement of a $190 laptop.

The notebook measures roughly 120 x 100 x 30mm (WDH) and weighs only 900g. The notebook boots in 15 seconds from its solid-state 2GB flash drive. The huge auditorium then burst into applause as Shih revealed the astounding price tag. Dubbed the 3ePC, Shih claimed the notebook is the 'lowest cost and easiest PC to use'.

The notebook uses a custom-written Linux operating system, much like the OLPC, though unlike the OLPC, Asus has chosen a more conventional interface. The 3epc is based on an unspecified Intel processor and chipset. Given the laptop's low cost, it may well be among the first products based on Tolopai, Intel's forthcoming Pentium M-powered SoC (system-on-chip). Along with a Pentium M core clocked between 600MHz and 1.2GHz, initial Tolopai chips are expected to integrate components traditionally found in PC northbridges and southbridges — a graphics processing unit (GPU), external memory and storage controllers, and peripheral interfaces such as USB and Ethernet."

Link to Original Source
Portables

+ - A closer look at Asus' $199 computer

Submitted by Known Nutter
Known Nutter (988758) writes "This year's Computex is proving to be very exciting with Asus' introduction of their $200 PC. Chairman Jonney Shih introduced the flash-powered portable computer and claimed that it can boot in about 15 seconds. The computer will be available in 7 and 10-inch screen versions and will run a customized Linux distro. Asus has not said when the computer will be available."
The Courts

+ - Teacher's conviction for porn popups set aside->

Submitted by scaridicat
scaridicat (666) writes "Julie Amero, the substitute teacher convicted of four felony counts when a computer in her classroom subjected seventh-graders to pornographic images, has been granted a new trial in light of fresh forensic information that came to light following her first trial.

In setting aside the conviction on Wednesday, Superior Court Judge Hillary B. Strackbein ruled that the prosecution's expert computer witness, a Norwich police detective, provided "erroneous" testimony about the classroom computer, according to an article in the Hartford Courant. She cited a forensic computer analysis conducted after the trial by the state police crime lab, which she said "contradicts testimony of the state's computer witness."

At Wednesday's hearing, Assistant State Attorney David Smith — who during the trial argued the evidence was "clear cut" that Amero had caused the pornography to appear on the computer — acknowledged that erroneous information concerning the computer was presented to the jury. He said the state would take no position on Amero's motion for a new trial, an indication she will not be tried again.

"A great weight has been lifted off my back," a tearful Amero, 40, said following the ruling."

Link to Original Source
Television

+ - Joost Signs on New Partners, Opens Up Invites

Submitted by rm69990
rm69990 (885744) writes "The new Joost internet television service, formerly known as the Venice Project, announced a handful of new content distribution agreements. In addition to previously-announced content deals with CBS and Viacom, Joost will also carry programming from CNN and other Turner Broadcasting System properties. Current beta users will also be able to invite anyone to sign up with Joost in advance of the service moving out of its beta phase later this month, as opposed to the old system where invites were sparse, much like the very early days of Gmail."
Google

+ - Google Rebrands Personalized Homepage as iGoogle

Submitted by rm69990
rm69990 (885744) writes "Google has officially rebranded their personalized homepage as iGoogle. According to Marissa Mayer, Google's VP of search products and user experience, iGoogle was floated as a name for the Personalized Homepage back in 2005 when the service was being assembled. One of the major new features of iGoogle is the ability to build gadgets without any prior programming experience. For those not in the know, Gadgets are similar to widgets on Apple's Dashboard or... gadgets on Vista's toolbar."
Biotech

Vitamin D Deficiency Behind Many Western Cancers? 478

Posted by Zonk
from the need-a-supplement-now dept.
twilight30 wrote us with a link to an article in the Globe and Mail. If further study bears out the findings, new research into the causative agents behind disease and cancer may have a drastic impact on the health of citizens in Canada and the US. According to a four-year clinical trial, there's a direct link between cancer and Vitamin D deficiency. "[The] trial involving 1,200 women, and found those taking the vitamin had about a 60-per-cent reduction in cancer incidence, compared with those who didn't take it, a drop so large — twice the impact on cancer attributed to smoking — it almost looks like a typographical error. And in an era of pricey medical advances, the reduction seems even more remarkable because it was achieved with an over-the-counter supplement costing pennies a day. One of the researchers who made the discovery, professor of medicine Robert Heaney of Creighton University in Nebraska, says vitamin D deficiency is showing up in so many illnesses besides cancer that nearly all disease figures in Canada and the U.S. will need to be re-evaluated. 'We don't really know what the status of chronic disease is in the North American population,' he said, 'until we normalize vitamin D status.'"
Music

RIAA Claims Ownership of All Artist Royalties For Internet Radio 458

Posted by Zonk
from the isn't-that-called-stealing dept.
ISurfTooMuch writes "With the furor over the impending rate hike for Internet radio stations, wouldn't a good solution be for streaming internet stations to simply not play RIAA-affiliated labels' music and focus on independent artists? Sounds good, except that the RIAA's affiliate organization SoundExchange claims it has the right to collect royalties for any artist, no matter if they have signed with an RIAA label or not. 'SoundExchange (the RIAA) considers any digital performance of a song as falling under their compulsory license. If any artist records a song, SoundExchange has the right to collect royalties for its performance on Internet radio. Artists can offer to download their music for free, but they cannot offer their songs to Internet radio for free ... So how it works is that SoundExchange collects money through compulsory royalties from Webcasters and holds onto the money. If a label or artist wants their share of the money, they must become a member of SoundExchange and pay a fee to collect their royalties.'"
Music

Jobs Says People Don't Want to 'Rent' Music 203

Posted by Zonk
from the money-can-be-exchanged-for-good-and-services dept.
eldavojohn writes "PhysOrg is running a piece on a recent speech by Apple CEO Steve Jobs about DRM free music. While we know that Jobs is a self proclaimed proponent of DRM free music who's not all talk, he's now said that 'by the end of this year, over half of the songs we offer on iTunes we believe will be in DRM-free versions. I think we're going to achieve that.' Jobs pointed out what's obvious to us, the consumers, but isn't obvious to the music industry — 'People want to own their music.' He also dismissed subscription based music as a failure, and claimed a lot of other music labels are intrigued by the EMI deal."
Programming

Virtues of Monoculture, Or Why Microsoft Wins 703

Posted by kdawson
from the nice-tools-in-the-cathedral dept.
blackbearnh writes to ask, "Why does Microsoft win the development environment war so often, when we all know it's a lifetime lock-in to Windows? Perhaps it's because the open source community offers too much choice." From the post: "Microsoft offers the certainty of no choices. Choice isn't always good, and the open source community sometimes offers far too many ways to skin the same cat, choices that are born more out of pride, ego, or stubbornness than a genuine need for two different paths. I won't point fingers, everyone knows examples... The reality is that there are good, practical reasons that drive people into the arms of the Redmond tool set, and we need to accept that as a fact and learn from it, rather than shake our fists and curse the darkness."
Security

Spy Act of 2007 = "Vendors Can Spy Act" 309

Posted by kdawson
from the legalizing-spyware dept.
strick1226 writes "Ed Foster over at InfoWorld describes the Spy Act bill (H.R. 964) as having the same relation to the prevention of spyware that the CAN SPAM Act had to the prevention of spam. It allows exceptions for companies to utilize spyware for any number of reasons; if this bill had been law when Sony distributed their rootkit, they would have had perfect cover. Most troubling is that the bill would preempt all state laws, including those more focused on the privacy of people's data, and disallow individuals from bringing suit. It is expected to pass soon with 'strong bipartisan support.'"

"Who cares if it doesn't do anything? It was made with our new Triple-Iso-Bifurcated-Krypton-Gate-MOS process ..."

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