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Comment: That'll work well (Score 1) 199

by Victor_0x53h (#46516281) Attached to: A Call For Rollbacks To Previous Versions of Software
Easy enough for a desktop application when all you have to do is uninstall the new version, and install the older one. A little more complex for your PC or laptop's OS: you need is enough free space on the disk drive to store all the originals and a somewhat elaborate restoration routine. The idea's great, but there are limiting factors for a phone (disk space, processing power). Whats more is all the different firmwares for radios, gps, etc. which should, but don't always like to take a step back if you simply install the old firmware over top. Maybe we could just download all of the OS and factory restore the whole thing to whatever version. This would work, but it's kind of a hassle for your average user - probably not what Andy meant. Moors law dictates these devices will become more powerful, so maybe in the not-so-distant future. Really though, if they can't get the new OS to work right why do you think they could perfect a restoration routine. Who is this guy anyhow?

Comment: Clever Exploitation or Genuine Belief? (Score 1) 126

by Victor_0x53h (#46401661) Attached to: Interview: Ask Eric Raymond What You Will
Are you sincere in your vehement G+ rants on Global Warming or is this a clever exploitation of humans "Backfire Effect" (when given evidence against their beliefs, people can reject the evidence and believe even more strongly)?

What particularly made me think this at one point was: "Does that kind of language persuade anybody"?

+ - Tor is building an anonymous instant messenger

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes ""Forget the $16 billion romance between Facebook and WhatsApp. There's a new messaging tool worth watching.

Tor, the team behind the world's leading online anonymity service, is developing a new anonymous instant messenger client, according to documents produced at the Tor 2014 Winter Developers Meeting in Reykjavik, Iceland.""

Comment: Re:Evil Plot (Score 1) 174

by Victor_0x53h (#45748799) Attached to: DHS Turns To Unpaid Interns For Nation's Cyber Security
I think you're onto something, but paid interns are the ones who actually get jobs. Turns out those students convinced to work for free don't fair much better than students that get no internship. What's ironic is that unpaid interns are actually paying [tuition] to get college credits while working a job without compensation. Crazy. Here's the first source I could find.

Not necessarily a plot, just another trick in the bag.

Comment: Re:My personal recommendation... (Score 1) 381

by Victor_0x53h (#45212231) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Best SOHO Printer Choices?
I can second Samsung as a solid choice. I have the Black & White, laser ML-2851MD and bought my boss the color version, CPL-620ND. I recall the CPL-620ND had some funky interface/setup issue that was annoying but not a show stopper. Both support PCL and PostScript so worked well with Linux. Both are discontinued, but I'm sure there is a new revision worth considering.

I really would have liked a Kyocera or even an Okidata (for nostalgic reasons), but the Samsung was the right price. I've had it for 2 years without problems.

Comment: Re:Queue really bad Charter joke. (Score 1) 97

I was interested to see what TCP manipulation you were referring to, so I read into the abstract a little. I've never fully dug into the details of how nmap works, but it seems nmap and zmap use nearly identical techniques: sending out packets using a raw socket which bypasses the kernel, then libpcap to capture results. The novelty here is that zmap is written specifically to "scan the internet" while nmap is more of a multi-purpose utility and just isn't as efficient at this particular function. Additionally zmap seems to bypass the kernel even when performing a SYN scan which nmap does not do (there might be an option - I'm not a guru).

So to answer your question, because abstract specifically mentions zmap uses a SYN scan, these probes can't really be blocked if you're running a legitimate service on the port being probed. If you were to use zmap with some other scan that takes advantage protocol (e.g. FIN scan), any iptables firewall is probably already blocking it.

Comment: Re:How did this happen? (Score 1) 192

by Victor_0x53h (#42695877) Attached to: Thousands of Publicly Accessible Printers Searchable On Google
I'm presuming these setups are accidental. Is the DHCP scope on their internal, physical network configured to hand out public IP addresses? My mind boggles wondering if that would even work, much less someone would make that decision. The alternative is someone who knows what they're doing intentionally NATs web traffic to the internal address. That raises the oxymoronic "knows what they're doing" and "NATs web traffic to a printer" quandary.

Comment: Re:Profit (Score 2) 227

Liability? I thought the same thing. Maybe it's just what super-rich people do: buy stuff. Like a yacht used 10 days out of the year. I can just imagine how regal it would be to say to my friends "Lets spend New Years at my place in Times Square, guys!" It just turns out we can't watch the ball drop because it's mounted directly above us - on my roof.

Nothing is easier than to denounce the evildoer; nothing is more difficult than to understand him. - Fyodor Dostoevski

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