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Submission + - German NSA critic denied entry to the US

An anonymous reader writes: Major newspapers in Germany (FAZ, Die Welt, SZ, ...) and the Huffington Post report that the author Ilja Trojanow has been denied to board a plane from Salvador da Bahia to the US where he was invited to attend a conference. He had ESTA documents showing that his visit was approved as part of the Visa Waiver Program and was last year given a visa to teach at the university of Saint Louis. Trojanow was one of the initiators of an open letter urging Chancellor Merkel to take actions against NSA surveillance in Germany.

Submission + - Art Seizures

qeorqe writes: Three visitors to the multimedia art installation "Zee" by Kurt Hentschlager may have suffered seizures. It was closed indefinitely after three incidents in its first three days. The exhibit consisted of a fog filled room where one's visual field is filled with changing and pulsing colored light patterns.

This is part of Pittsburgh's International Festival of Firsts. The festival also includes a four story high yellow rubber ducky in Pittsburgh's rivers.

Submission + - Japanese start-up plans hydrogen fuel cell for 2014 (

angry tapir writes: A Japanese start-up says it has finessed a technology that could finally make consumer-grade fuel cells a reality. If successful, the company, Aquafairy, would create a business where many much larger companies have failed. Prototypes of the company's hydrogen fuel cell technology are on show this week at the Ceatec exhibition in Japan where the company's president, Mike Aizawa, said he hopes the first products will be on sale next year.

Submission + - Self-healing, self-heating flash memory survives more than 100 million cycles (

MrSeb writes: "Macronix, one of the world’s largest producers of flash memory, has produced a new kind of flash memory that can survive more than 100 million program/erase (PE) cycles — most likely long enough to persist until the end of human civilization. By comparison, the NAND cells found in conventional flash memory — as in commercial SSDs — generally have a lifespan of just a few thousand PE cycles. For such a huge advance you would expect an equally vast technological leap — but in this instance, that’s certainly not the case. Macronix just adds a bit of heat — literally, each of Macronix’s new memory cells contains a heating element that can deliver a jolt of 800C (1472F) heat to the cell, healing it and preventing wear-out. Furthermore, 100 million PE cycles is a low-ball estimate: In reality, Macronix’s new flash might survive billions of cycles — but it would take so long to test that the company doesn’t yet know."

Submission + - NASA Data Breach Predicted In Its Own Newsletter (

An anonymous reader writes: NASA suffered a major data breach on Oct 31, 2012 when a laptop with the sensitive personal information of 10,000+ employees was stolen from an employee's car in Washington, DC. As it turns out, the NASA CIO had predicted just such an event, right down to the mockup headlines in the CIO's July IT Newsletter (see page 6). It didn't quite make the front page of the NY Times, but it did get their attention. Among the employees and contractors affected by the data breach are some of the plaintiffs from the Nelson v. NASA privacy case that was decided in 2011. Among the arguments (aside from intrusive investigations) is that the government was likely to improperly release the collected data. Some of the plaintiffs were already retired from NASA when their data was lost, and others had submitted to the background investigations less than 6 months before.

Submission + - Google: Microsoft, Comcast and RIAA lead requests for content removal (

daktari writes: Google claims that among copyright owners Microsoft, Comcast and the RIAA make the most requests for removal of content from Google’s search service.

Microsoft requested 2.5 million pages be removed from Google's search service. They're followed by Comcast's NBCUniversal (1 million requests) and the RIAA (400,000) requests.

Submission + - Microcomputer fitting into your eye down the la (

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers have developed what is believed to be the first complete millimeter-scale computing system, designed to be implanted into the human eye to track the progress of glaucoma, a potentially blinding disease.

Submission + - Journalist fired, Mexicans protest with a DDoS (

An anonymous reader writes: This Monday, the popular journalist Carmen Aristegui was fired from the media conglomerate MVS Comunicaciones after she demanded the Mexican President, Felipe Calderon, to explain if he is an alcoholic or not. This question was motivated after some opposition congressmen depicted this popular rumor in a banner.

Thousands of mexicans considered this as an act of censorship, organizing demonstrations against MVS. Also, a group of mexican Twitter and Facebook users will launch a DDoS attack against the servers of the media conglomerate, mimicking the attacks organized by Anonymous in support of WikiLeaks.


Submission + - LG Wants PlayStation 3 Banned From US Market (

FlorianMueller writes: On Friday LG filed a complaint against Sony with the US International Trade Commission, claiming the PlayStation 3 infringes four Blu-ray Disc patents and demanding a permanent ban of the PS3 (and possibly other products) from the US market. LG, which boasts that it owns 90,000 patents worldwide, appears to take this step in retaliation for a previous Sony complaint about various LG smartphones, which the ITC is already investigating. This is reminiscent of Motorola's infringement action against the Xbox 360 that is part of its wider dispute with Microsoft. In other words, you touch my smartphones and I bomb your game consoles.

Artificial Retinas Can Balance a Pencil On Its End 165

mikejuk writes "A team of researchers has built a neural information system that is good enough and fast enough to balance a pencil in real time. If you think it's an easy task, try it! The Institute of Neuroinformatics, ETH / University Zurich have used what look like video cameras to do the job but in fact they are analog silicon retinas. They work so fast that even with fairly basic hardware they can balance a pencil."

J.J. Abrams Promises 'Fringe' Will Die Fighting 392

An anonymous reader writes "Fringe creator J.J. Abrams has said of the show's much-maligned move to Friday nights, 'Fringe deserves to live beyond season 3. If we're going to fail, let's go down doing the most bad ***, weirdest, interesting, sophisticated version of a series that we could possibly do.' Previous announcements about the move were more defensive, claiming that Fringe's shift to Fridays was an attempt to draw younger viewers back to the 'dead zone' of Friday nights. But season three has been confused enough in tone and approach that it's no surprise to hear yet another contradictory statement about its future..." Good episodes of Fringe have been great TV. I've really enjoyed the first half of the season and am looking forward to seeing what they do with it. A lot of mediocre SciFi has been shut down recently (Caprica? SGU?) and a lot of bad SciFi continues (V?) but Fringe flirts with greatness with regularity. I hope it makes it... even though on Friday it's not likely.

Righthaven Adds Forum Posters To Copyright Suit 83

eldavojohn writes "The last time we discussed the Las Vegas Review-Journal and their litigating attorneys at Righthaven LLC, they were suing all the websites that had violated their news copyrights. Well, they've now added seven individual message board posters that they've managed to identify, bringing the number of DMCA-related lawsuits they have launched since March to 203. In one case, LVRJ is upset that a Google Groups user named Jim_Higgins posted a column that cited the columnist but failed to cite the original LVRJ article. But Google Groups is protected from these suits, as the article explains: 'Both the madjacksports and Google sites are somewhat protected from copyright lawsuits because they have posted "DMCA" notices as required by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. These notices, which must be registered with the US Copyright Office, inform copyright holders who to contact if they would like infringing material removed.' The first decision of this cluster of lawsuits was against Righthaven, yet the onslaught continues. Righthaven has publicly dismissed fair use as well."
United Kingdom

EDSAC Computer To Be Rebuilt 97

nk497 writes with this bit from PCPro: "The first working stored-program computer is set to be rebuilt at Bletchley Park, home to the UK's National Museum of Computing. The Electronic Delay Storage Automatic Calculator ran its first programme in 1949, and was two metres high. Its 3,000 vacuum tubes took up four metres of floor space, and it could perform 650 instructions per second. All data input was via paper tape. The EDSAC used mercury-filled tubes for memory, but in the interests of safety, the replica will use an alternative non-toxic substance. Rebuilding it will take four years, and the public can visit to watch the work as it happens."

Capcom 'Saddened' By Game Plagiarism Controversy 163

Capcom's recent release of action platformer Maxsplosion for the iPhone caused indie developer Twisted Pixel to call Capcom out for copying the concept from their successful Xbox Live game 'Splosion Man. Twisted Pixel said they had no plans for legal action, since they were "too small to take on a company like Capcom." The indie studio had even pitched the game to Capcom for publishing at one point, but were declined. Now, Capcom has released a statement denying that Maxsplosion's development team had any knowledge of the meetings and saying, "MaXplosion was developed independently by Capcom Mobile. Nonetheless, we are saddened by this situation and hope to rebuild the trust of our fans and friends in the gaming community."

RapidShare Threatens Suit Over Piracy Allegations 183

Hugh Pickens writes "PC Magazine reports that RapidShare, named as a contributor to digital piracy by a MarkMonitor report, has threatened to sue for defamation. 'This defamation of RapidShare as a digital piracy site is absurd and we reserve the right to take legal action against MarkMonitor,' says RapidShare in a statement. 'RapidShare is a legitimate company that offers its customers fast, simple and secure storage and management of large amounts of data via our servers.' MarkMonitor, a Web site that specializes in 'enterprise brand protection,' says in their study that the most-trafficked domains engaged in digital piracy included three sites —,, and — that combined yielded 21 billion pageviews per year. RapidShare acknowledged that copyrighted files do get uploaded to its site, however 'these users are in the absolute minority compared with those who use our services to pursue perfectly legitimate interests.' RapidShare says that it does not open and view the files of its users, and contains no search function so that other users may look for content."

"Consider a spherical bear, in simple harmonic motion..." -- Professor in the UCB physics department