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Comment: TPLink 1043ND (Score 1) 398

by Venerence (#37438678) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Good Gigabit 802.11N Home Router?
By far the best cost effective gigabit router I've found is the TP-Link 1043ND. It uses an Atheros AR71XX Chipset, comes with 3 antennae, a usb port, 8MB of Flash and 32MB of RAM (which is double what most routers come with). More importantly, it can support almost all custom brands of firmware (even marks it as a feature on their website), including the best one (IMO) out there, Gargoyle. For those who don't know what gargoyle is, it comes with most of the standard features of an openWRT router. However, on top of that, it support quotas/throttling (IE, if you go over x mb of uploads you can throttle the uploading for the next hour/day/etc.). It's most important feature, however, is that it can track open connections and bandwidth usage *by ip/mac address*. IE, with this firmware, you can tell exactly who on your network is hogging the bandwidth.

Comment: Re:Line of criminal thought (Score 1) 452

by Venerence (#36329514) Attached to: Sony Compromised, Again
The purpose of the hackers is to damage the company that they have no other method of attacking. They consider Sony's actions deplorable. More importantly, they see Sony's bending of the legal system -- to strongarm dissenters -- as something they need to fight, but only have one avenue of doing so. It doesn't matter to them that people get caught in the crossfire, in fact they prefer it because the more sensational they make the story, the more people will be afraid to use Sony's products.

Bottom line is you got the analogy wrong. They aren't virtual thieves. They're virtual terrorists.

Comment: On a general statement about piracy (Score 1) 277

by Venerence (#35366660) Attached to: 13 Countries On US "Priority Watch List" For Copyright Piracy
One of the best things about living in Australia is we're so off the world political map that it is like its own semitransparent bubble of isolation. I can personally pirate all I need to and not worry about any repercussions as the big leagues just don't care about our poisonous-animal-and-cute-fuzzy-rabbit infested desert of an island.

That being said, I have no problem with personal piracy. I don't justify it, I don't say that it's a victimless crime, I don't make roundabout logic that say the 'victims' are actually getting a backhanded profit. I just don't care about the victims.

Why should I, Joe Blog, computer repair shop 40 thousand dollar a year worker, care about the woes and tribulations about a person who makes millions of a year? Am I really going to cry a river when their 15 million annual income drops to 13 million? Do I care if I pirate an enormously successful game? "But what about the crushingly hard worked game developers who toil under their publisher's whips?" Why should I care? They can be lucky to get a 5 grand bonus on a successful game, maybe a millionth of the profit will ever touch their carpel-tunneled claws. Their problem is they need a union.

There is really only one thing that I detest and that is when money is torn out of the indie and independent artists. I spent 89 dollars on the humble indie bundle (which, by the way, is the average retail price of australian games for no arbitrary reason given the dollar parity). I pay to go see the new bands show up at the local pub. I loved seeing Jonathan Coulton live during my visit to the US. If you want to make an impact with piracy, don't throw a fit because the government is in the Mafiaa's pocket, do what you can to avoid them and then support the people who really deserve it.

Comment: Needs More Ambition (Score 1) 620

by Venerence (#34638256) Attached to: Electric Cars May Be Made Noisier By Law
It might be well and good to play a crazy sound from the car, but this idea can be taken farther. How about we tape a kinect to each side of the car, have it recognize humans optically, and play the metal gear "BWEEP" whenever the car gets close. Bonus points if it automatically records the person jumping a foot in the air and diving in the nearest bushes.

Comment: Re:Their defense is... interesting (Score 1) 299

That is a terrible analogy. Shooting someone in the head is clearly illegal. Trading with someone, as mutually agreed transaction, into bankruptcy is perfectly legal. It may be morally questionable, but just because people put their money in the hands of a computer doesn't make it any less legal.
Science

A Step Toward an Invisibility Cloak 197

Posted by kdawson
from the can-you-see-me-now dept.
Technology Review has a writeup on the latest advance in the lab towards an invisibility cloak made of metamaterials, described this week in Science. We've been following this technology since the beginning. The breakthrough is software that lets researchers design materials that are both low-loss and wideband. "The cloak that the researchers built works with wavelengths of light ranging from about 1 to 18 gigahertz — a swath as broad as the visible spectrum. No one has yet made a cloaking device that works in the visible spectrum, and those metamaterials that have been fabricated tend to work only with narrow bands of light. But a cloak that made an object invisible to light of only one color would not be of much use. Similarly, a cloaking device can't afford to be lossy: if it lets just a little bit of light reflect off the object it's supposed to cloak, it's no longer effective. The cloak that Smith built is very low loss, successfully rerouting almost all the light that hits it."

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