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Comment: Re:Just link to the ACTUAL blog entry (Score 5, Insightful) 152

Microsoft is evil in the same way that suicide is a sin. We're talking about a company that's only relevant on one doomed platform, choking to death on too many brands and too many failed attempts to enter other markets. Unix is everywhere. Unix beat Microsoft a long time ago.

Stop poisoning the discourse by giving Microsoft such a disproportionate share of the hate. Adobe's just as bad, and Oracle's a lot worse. Why don't you rail against them? Why don't we talk about how, once Windows is gone, our only practical choice will be between a walled garden or an operating system that's philosophically dominated by the toxic, vapid musings of a man who literally believes that it is better to let your children starve to death than ply your trade as a software developer?

Comment: Re:windows are for working with many things at onc (Score 2) 1134

by Unoriginal_Nickname (#40513571) Attached to: Has the Command Line Outstayed Its Welcome?

You don't write code in a CLI. You just happen to use the same terminal emulator that hosts your CLI to host a text editor and IDE, and that's only in the worst-case scenario where you are too much a troglodyte to even use gvim (let alone a modern IDE.)

A command line is great for lots of things. Writing code isn't one of those things.

Comment: Re:too much regulation! (Score 2) 251

by Unoriginal_Nickname (#40449089) Attached to: Quiet Victories Won In the Loudness Wars

It never would work that way. Basic game theory always predicts that rational agents engage in a 'race to the bottom.' Just like how the Prisoner's Dilemma puts both players in prison, if some underhanded technique even has the potential to make one firm more competitive, it is guaranteed to become an industry standard. "Voting with your dollars" doesn't work. It can't work.

Economics 101 should be mandatory.

Comment: Re:This can't be right (Score 1) 178

by Unoriginal_Nickname (#39936763) Attached to: Microsoft Makes Ambitious Carbon Neutral Pledge

The manufacture of solar cells and LFP batteries is not a carbon-neutral process. You would need to plant a lot of trees to make up for the coal and oil that was burnt to make your home energy-efficient.

We also have finite resources. It might cost you $10,000 today, but there is almost no demand for household solar. The real marginal cost of solar power adoption would be much higher than that.

Comment: Re:Why? (Score 1) 128

by Unoriginal_Nickname (#39888563) Attached to: British Broadband Needs £1bn More Funding

I think what you should really be asking is why 'austerity' is the word of the day.

Fiscal policy is an effective way to stabilize the economy. The basic idea is that government spending increases relative to real GDP during contractions, while taxation decreases or remains stable. The idea is for fiscal policy to smooth out the business cycle. Liberals and conservatives, in all countries, understand this idea very well*. That's why you only see them talking about austerity measures when they're talking about getting rid of something they personally dislike. Actually applying it across the board would be economic seppuku (other than hopeless cases like Greece.)

(* Like most intelligent and educated people, I am ignoring the Libertarians.)

Comment: Re:what about the rest of the life cycle? (Score 1) 95

by Unoriginal_Nickname (#39835149) Attached to: Google Releases FCC Report On Street View Probe

Google doesn't have customers to gather requirements from. They make up random stuff that sounds okay, and then use A/B testing to see if people like it.

Keep in mind, Google is not a software company. Popularity is not a way to choose features. Popularity is a way to sell advertisements.

Comment: Re:Time for the MPAA to gasp it's last breath... (Score 2) 107

Market cap doesn't matter so much; it's just the sum market value of all of the outstanding public shares. It's a convenient heuristic but estimating the actual price is much more complicated.

For example, Sony owns controlling interests in Sony Pictures and Sony Music. Owning both of these businesses means they can control the direction of the industry, so their stake is much more valuable to Sony than the market value.

Market cap matters more when you're talking about a hostile takeover, because it can be used to directly estimate the amount of money you would need to spend. Hostile takeovers aren't normally possible, though. Corporations are allowed to issue classes of shares with different rights, and the publicly-traded class normally has fewer (or no) voting rights. Normally, if the company has a remotely competent board and CFO, a single person could buy every single public share and still not control the company.

Comment: Re:EA strangles another once great studio (Score 3, Insightful) 235

To be totally fair, EA doesn't do this stuff out of malice. EA's acquisitions fail because their executives are miserably incompetent.

Basically this is what happens: some manager plays a game made by a beloved studio or minor competitor, and they get all starry-eyed about the amazing things the studio could do with some extra money. EA buys them, and it works fine for a little while. Then, some executive realizes that their subsidiary's games are really profitable, so they order the subsidiary to expand and work on more games. Other executives order rolling staffing changes based on whatever project sounds popular at the time. Quality slips as team members are overworked and no longer emotionally invested. Meanwhile the key staff, usually the founders, are used to dealing with small teams and small budgets. They allow themselves to be divided across too many projects to be effective managers. No longer constrained by small budgets, their ambitions explode and runaway projects become a major problem. EA's managers try to put the studio back on track by setting firm deadlines, but due to an institutional lack of effective project management or engineering experience, their deadlines are physically impossible. EA publishes a steaming turd in time for Christmas, decides the unit has lost its magic, and shuts it down. EA's accountants use the ordinary/capital losses to offset their gains from sports, and all of the executives take home a fat bonus.

Comment: Re:Why now? (Score 2, Interesting) 112

by Unoriginal_Nickname (#39552711) Attached to: Double-Helix Model of DNA Paper Published 59 Years Ago

Sorry to ruin your day, but our base-10 numeral system is literally the only thing us "metric-system folks" think is special about 10. At the very least, it's a damn sight more convenient than the base "width of thumb" and base "length of foot" that's prized by the knuckledraggers and mouthbreathers.

Man must shape his tools lest they shape him. -- Arthur R. Miller

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