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Comment: Re:WTF?? (Score 1) 793

I've seen comments like this a couple of times now and I have an easy way to demonstrate that bullying was (and is) illegal. I believe Aus and US law are not too far apart on this - either the bully hits the bullied, or does not. If he does, he can be found guilty of battery. If not, he can be found guilty of assault, (if the bullied person feels his safety is at risk that's technically enough).

Comment: Re:IPv6 should have been entrenched before TLD pro (Score 1) 164

by DavidRawling (#46364407) Attached to: ICANN Considers Using '127.0.53.53' To Tackle DNS Namespace Collisions

Sure they do - all the major web servers and hosting platforms can use and define vhosts (it's just that the mechanism for creating them differs on each platform). IIS for example, if you create a new site, using "All IP Addresses" port 80, will require that you designate a host header so that the HTTP engine can route the request to the right Web Site (and corresponding content). All IP Addresses port 80 with an empty Host Header acts as a "catch-all" and is assigned to the Default Web Site. Which you generally disable, and create your own config for, if you know what you're doing. Apache, on the other hand, configures those vhosts in text files (nowadays under sites-enabled, as I recall). But the functionality is all there on pretty much all major platforms.

Now if you're arguing that the administrators of IIS servers are exponentially less likely to have a clue about host headers, when compared to their Apache/nginx counterparts - well then from my experience you're absolutely right (my history is MS consulting, and the number of IIS admins who want 20 IP addresses for 20 sites because they don't get how to do host headers, DNS resolution etc, cannot be counted - the reverse can be counted on both hands over 20 years of doing this stuff).

Comment: Re:So? (Score 0) 359

by aichpvee (#46326163) Attached to: Ghostwriter Reveals the Secret Life of WikiLeaks Founder Julian Assange

The personal failings of one man seem mighty inconsequential against the failings of government and large corporations that have been exposed by Wikileaks. The latter definitely does not deserve national and international media hype at the same time that the former is getting buried.

Comment: Shades of grey, not black and white (Score 1) 298

by DavidRawling (#46168399) Attached to: Is Verizon Already Slowing Netflix Down?

No, it means anecdotal evidence is to be taken as better than no evidence whatsoever. Not everything is black and white, one side of the fence or t'other.

Consider this as a scale - Peer reviewed, multiple-source reproducible trumps anecdotal evidence, but anecdotal evidence is still better than the absence of any evidence on either side.

Comment: Re:Erm, the 3DS (Score -1) 559

by aichpvee (#46089221) Attached to: How Can Nintendo Recover?

Nintendo games are too much of a chore to play these days. I just don't have the time to put up with slow dialog scrolls that can't be skipped or hours of tutorializing on systems and controls that have been standard for decades. Even if they put their games on other hardware I'd probably avoid their games, and I'm definitely not going to buy their hardware to put up with that crap on maybe three or four games I'd have any interest in for the lifetime of the device.

Nintendo may not need to change to survive, but they definitely need to change to win back customers like me.

Comment: Re:They will use the data in court (Score 1) 599

Cop 1: "He looked like he was hiding something, yer onner". When we stopped him he kept looking around and acting strangely."

Cop 2: "Yeah, yeah, wot he said."

You: "I did no such thing, your honour."

Judge: Both cops say you did, 2 trusted public officials with no reason to lie against 1 obvious reprobate, probable cause, case dismissed with prejudice.

Comment: Re:If I ever own a Ford.... (Score 1) 599

Do you really think the telcos would be able to charge full monthly fees for each car despite it sending a few dozen kB a month? Most likely something like the kindle model - where I'm guessing Amazon pay the telcos 20c a month or something, because while the total data amount is huge, the amount of data per device is so small and only the aggregate so large. Same with FROD. 50M extra data streams, once a day spread country-wide? Noise to the telco's existing data streams. Frod and all the others will negotiate the rates down to SFA, they get the data, the telcos get more revenue/profit and the only loser is you, the consumer.

Comment: Re:crashed my machine (Score 1) 214

Except the fuckers crashed my machine when they pushed out the update.

Citation needed, since I recall no such major outcry. Your machine is probably one of the ones with 25 browser toolbars, or ten download accelerators, or fifty outdated browser plugins, or a couple of undetected rookits etc., which is usually the reason behind a security patch "crashing your machine".

And if Windows closed the app with unsaved work, you'd be here whinging that Microsoft destroyed your work. And if you really gave a crap, you'd go in and change the Windows Update setting from "Automatically install" to "Ask me first".

Microsoft has done some seriously stupid stuff. And some bad stuff. But if you want to abuse them, at least abuse them for the stupid stuff not the sane stuff.

Security

Ask Slashdot: How To Protect Your Passwords From Amnesia? 381

Posted by Soulskill
from the train-a-friendly-dolphin-to-use-KeePass dept.
Phopojijo writes "You can encrypt your password library using a client-side manager or encrypted file container. You could practice your password every day, keep no written record, and do everything else right. You then go in for a serious operation or get in a terrible accident and, when you wake up, suffer severe memory loss. Slashdot readers, what do you consider an acceptable trade-off between proper security and preventing a data-loss catastrophe? I will leave some details and assumptions up to interpretation (budget, whether you have friends or co-workers to rely on, whether your solution will defend against the Government, chance of success, and so forth). For instance, would you split your master password in pieces and pay an attorney to contact you with a piece of it in case of emergency? Would you get a safe deposit box? Some biometric device? Leave the password with your husband, wife, or significant other? What can Slashdot come up with?"

Thus mathematics may be defined as the subject in which we never know what we are talking about, nor whether what we are saying is true. -- Bertrand Russell

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