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Comment Non-genuine? (Score 1) 193

According to industry experts, use of pirated software, including Windows, results in a higher risk of malware, fraud — identity theft, credit card theft, etc. — public exposure of your personal information, and a higher risk for poor performance or feature malfunctions.

Corrected. The term "non-genuine" is not needed--it is superfluous. The sentence is correct with *any* version of Windows. All the damn thing is is a bunch of bits, doesn't matter if they come on a piece of plastic that Microsoft sold to some retailer or through a copyright-infringing file downloaded over the Internet. Either way it will eventually become infected by countless bits of invasive garbage for the vast majority of users. It's just that with Microsoft's version, at least it doesn't come pre-bundled with that junk. At least, by some definitions it doesn't. I would say that with the new Windows "apps" and their advertisements, the operating system comes with adware. And I doubt that many people would argue that various components of Windows have fit in the category of spyware for years now.

Comment Re:Start of th End (Score 1) 196

Meh... Firefox has been on an increasingly-sharp decline to shittiness ever since version 3, which rapidly accelerated with 4 and the rapid-release bullshit schedule as well as all the changes for no good reason. Too bad no one ever forked the last good version (aka. Firefox 2.x), and now we're all stuck with either Chrome or a Chrome rip-off, whether we want Chrome or not. I sure as hell do not, and therefore I am fucked. Hopefully the new browser by the guy who co-founded Opera actually turns out to be good, I always liked Opera... until they, too, shat all over their browser and made it yet another motherfucking Chrome wannabe (only going all-out in this case, literally basing it on Google's Chrome itself).

Comment Google's method is not perfect either. (Score 1) 271

The idea is good, but it's fucked by the fact that it is not universally usable across all software and systems. This means they had to come up with the atrocious idea of "app-specific passwords," which are just... passwords. One for each application adds extra insecurity, and they're already insecure to begin with, being all lower-case letters in the form of "xxxx xxxx xxxx xxxx" (with the spaces optional for easier reading). I'm sorry, but my actual Google passwords are a hell of a lot stronger than that, consisting of both capital and lower case letters, numbers, spaces and various symbols... and easily double that 16-letter string that Google generates. I tend to make as few of these insecure things as possible, and re-use them when it makes sense (I group them by system or general usage instead of one specific use per password; ie. one for each phone, laptop, desktop, etc.), deleting and creating new ones to replace the old every once in a while. You could get by without making a single app-specific password, but have fun connecting your Android phone to your Google account. And if you want to use a standard desktop-based e-mail client? No two-factor authentication there, so you will *have* to make a new weak Google-generated password for that.

Comment Re:Can't wait for this! (Score 4, Interesting) 327

Mozilla should expect a lot more fleeing users with that attitude. I just just about ready to ditch their browser anyway, and they only keep making me want to do it more. The only problem is that the the competition--Chrome--sucks, and is single-handedly the reason Firefox's interface has sucked for the last few years. Ever since Google released the crap and Mozilla decided to make Firefox a carbon copy of it.

Comment Re: Simple (Score 2) 635

The "massive power savings" of using an LCD screen might not be worth it compared to the far superior contrast ratios that a good old-fashioned CRT TV can provide. On those, black really is black, and it really makes a difference for many of the types of games and movies I would watch. If CRT-based HDTVs were still around, that would probably be my first choice even today since SED TVs are still nowhere to be found.

Comment Re:Adblock, NoScript, DoNotTrackMe. (Score 1) 418

I can't find NoScript for Firefox for Android, but I did find Adblock Plus for it. I'll give it a try, at the least it could allow me to browse the web without wasting bandwidth (and money) on ads, but it still won't solve the YouTube ad problem... that would require a system-wide ad blocker, which Android just won't allow without hacking.

Comment Re:Adblock, NoScript, DoNotTrackMe. (Score 1) 418

I use DownloadHelper normally. But yeah, I agree. I normally only ever see ads on my damn Android phone though. On a PC I "correct" it by installing the extensions before doing anything else when running a fresh browser, but on a phone--I have zero tolerance for ads (especially the fact that they are commercials, audio and video and everything). Just one of them and I back out of it.

To be fair, even using YouTube on my phone is rare, because Google has successfully destroyed it long ago. Want to find a music video that is not live? Too bad, it's not there, because the copyright holders don't want you watching their shit on "mobile device," so if you want to find anything at all you'd better be on a desktop anyway.

Comment Adblock, NoScript, DoNotTrackMe. (Score 3, Interesting) 418

Really, I don't know what I'd do without them. Probably stop using the Internet as much as I do now, find some alternatives, or do a hell of a lot more bitching.

When running a fresh new installation of a web browser, the first ad I see immediately causes me to halt everything I'm doing and install those three plugins. Annoyingly, I usually don't even hit two consecutive websites before that happens--the wretched fucking things are literally everywhere. Video ads really fucking piss me off, and even more on Android, because the god damn things are *designed* to reduce your access to the system, which effectively prevents installing ad blocking software without gaining root.

I have actually in the past, when confronted with an ad while trying to watch a video, cranked the volume all the way down and turned the phone upside down. If I did happen to see what brand was advertising, I add them to my mental blacklist of products and services to AVOID. Yes, I am so against advertising, it has the exact *opposite* effect on me when it comes to buying things. I'm sorry, but I can think for myself, I can do my own research and come up with an educated conclusion as to what I want or need. I don't fucking need someone spewing bullshit, trying to force me to buy their junk.

These days? When I even come across ONE ad when attempting to watch YouTube, I have zero tolerance. I close it. It is not worth the hassle. If I want to watch something bad enough, it will be on a proper computer with the necessary extensions. Android is one of the worst platforms to visit web pages or watch videos on.

Comment Re:Useless coins (Score 1) 753

Also... I should point out that I use the front-right pocket for the wallet, front-left pocket for change. When I have my cell phone and need a convenient place for it, and/or a thumb drive or pocket knife, they also go in the front-left, with the change. Works great for me. Keys? You seriously put them in your pocket? I just hang mine from one of my right-side belt loops. Yeah--that means my keys are noisy--but I have to admit, I don't mind hearing them when I walk. They serve as a reminder that I didn't, you know, forget them in the house (oops!) or something. And if I have my keys, 99.9% of the time I also have my wallet, so I'm not without my license and money, because I habitually pick up my wallet and keys, in that order.

Comment Re:Useless coins (Score 1) 753

Right now I have $98 in currency in my wallet (mix of 20s, 10s and 1s), and my wallet is showing no signs of distress. Personally, I'd rather have eight 1-dollar bills in my wallet than a small pile of heavy coins in my pocket, all mixed in with my thumb drives, keys, and pocket knife. I also prefer not to make jingle-jangle noises when I walk, but I suppose some people like that sound.

Your pants make "jingle-jangle" noises when you walk with change in your pocket? I don't know what kind of pants you wear (too baggy?), but I can honestly say that mine keep my change secure enough (with the help of gravity) that as long as I'm not leaning over in some odd way, I never hear my change jingle. Ever. Only if I happen to put my hand in my pocket and jiggle the inner lining around on purpose, at which point it's me consciously making the noise on purpose.

First world problem. If your currency is "all folded and bent and deformed in any way imaginable", you're not doing it right. Are you one of those people who keep their currency all wadded up in a ball? Anyway, if you think straightening out a pile of money is a nightmare, you should count yourself lucky in life.

Nope, I have a wallet. Why would I roll my bills up in a ball? And I will admit that it seems to be relatively rare these days that I encounter a totally screwed up, wrinkled dollar bill, but they do exist. But my point really was, even if rare, every single bill that has a random creased side or corner adds up and adds to the annoyance of managing it and working with the entire stack money. Just four duds can make the whole pile a pain in the ass to work with. And I'm talking ones here; assuming you have 15 of them, of which 8 are pretty neat and the rest have random creases here and there, it adds up and can be a pain in the ass.

Also, I wish I could say that my wallet didn't get so stuffed so badly with more bills, but it does. Then again, I refuse to pay $100 for a little piece of leather to keep my plastic cards, driver's license and bills organized in. Maybe that's my problem, I'm too cheap, but either way, it doesn't change the fact that pockets come included with the cost of all the pants and shorts that I've ever bought, they work well for holding change silently and securely the vast majority of the time, and for me it's nice to be able to grab a couple of coins instead of reaching for a wallet, opening it and fiddling with paper.

Comment Re:Useless coins (Score 1) 753

Well, I'll take a pocket full of dollar coins over dollar bills any day. I like coins--small, they have some nice weight to them, and they're easier to handle in large numbers for the most part. They won't fold, rip or get crinkled. The only major downside? Coins tend to fall out of my pocket if I lay down without taking them out.

On the other hand... have you ever had a wallet full of bills? Dollar bills, like pennies, can really add up. Add a couple fives, tens and twenties and your wallet will be about to burst, not wanting to close properly. Then the next time you pull your wallet out, you have to deal with the nightmare of wading through tens of loose pieces of paper, all folded and bent and deformed in any way imaginable, to get to the bills you need. And often because those damn 1-dollar bills, about as annoying as the damn penny and nickel (though not *quite* as worthless), end up taking space that just isn't really available, and having fewer bills (ie. larger dollar amounts; fives, tens, etc.) would be more pleasant to work with.

IMO they should ditch the penny and make the nickel the smallest measurement of change, and get rid of the $1 bill while they're at it making the $5 the smallest bill. Bring the 50-cent piece and the dollar coin into full circulation... and maybe even some of the old "eagle" coins ($2.50, $5, $10, maybe even $20). I would seriously almost NEVER use bills if they did that. I would be more likely to use the $10 and $20 bills than any other if I used any bills at all, but anything smaller, I'd personally use the coin. I hate the physical size of the dime though, I wish they'd give it a makeover... it's just too damn small to handle. The nickel is pretty bad too, but not quite as bad.

Uncertain fortune is thoroughly mastered by the equity of the calculation. - Blaise Pascal