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Comment Not a huge surprise... (Score 1) 837 837

I would like to call your attention to the following quote from a WP article from November 24, 2009 speaking to their decision to shutdown all of their national offices: "...Brauchli, a former foreign correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, acknowledged that "unquestionably there are advantages to having someone on the ground at times." But, he said, "We are not a national news organization of record serving a general audience. Nor are we a wire service or cable channel." Maintaining that The Post's strength is to report issues through a "Washington prism," Brauchli cited recent examples of education and economic reporters filing major dispatches from other cities to illustrate national trends..." (Original article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/24/AR2009112403014.html ) I believe the telling bit is the "Washington Prism", or mouth piece of the very regimes which are being called out in the leaked information. In that light this comes as no surprise. Also the author is a "fellow" of AEI. To quote wikipedia "Some AEI scholars are considered to be some of the leading architects of the second Bush administration's public policy."

Comment Not a huge surprise... (Score 1) 837 837

I would like to call your attention to the following quote from a WP article from November 24, 2009 speaking to their decision to shutdown all of their national offices: "...Brauchli, a former foreign correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, acknowledged that "unquestionably there are advantages to having someone on the ground at times." But, he said, "We are not a national news organization of record serving a general audience. Nor are we a wire service or cable channel." Maintaining that The Post's strength is to report issues through a "Washington prism," Brauchli cited recent examples of education and economic reporters filing major dispatches from other cities to illustrate national trends..." (Original article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/11/24/AR2009112403014.html ) I believe the telling bit is the "Washington Prism", or mouth piece of the very regimes which are being called out in the leaked information. In that light this comes as no surprise.

Submission + - Outlook Replacement 3 3

illeism writes: The company I work for is looking into going more open source. We have looked at Open Office for general office apps but there is no Outlook replacement with Open Office. The question here is, what are you guys using to replace Outlook for email, address books, calendars and other Outlook features?
Science

Submission + - Researchers Create Artificial Spider Silk Spinner->

alex_guy_CA writes: "Scientists have been investigating how to mimic spider silk for years. The seemingly delicate threads actually have a tensile strength five times greater than steel, and the possibilities for using a similar material in everything from buildings to bridges to cars and even clothing, are practically infinite. The only problem is, the stuff seems to be impossible to replicate. However, researchers have uncovered a key aspect in how spiders make silk, and they may be one step closer to man-made spider silk.

According to Science Daily, scientists from the Technische Universitaet Muenchen and the University of Bayreuth have solved the question of how spiders form long, stable, elastic fibers from the proteins stored in their silk glands in seconds. The spider silk is comprised of protein chains linked with stable physical connections, and between these are unlinked areas that contribute to the elasticity — making the silk both strong and flexible. But the mystery behind the molecules are what allows them to be stored in close confinement inside the silk gland without linking up and clumping. The scientists were able to figure out the structure of a control element used in the formation of the spider silk, and now they may be able to soon replicate the way spiders form silk. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100512131511.htm"

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Submission + - Hulu: HTML5 'doesn't yet meet our customers needs-> 1 1

TheReal_sabret00the writes: Hulu rolled out an updated version of its video player today, but what you may not have noticed is that the company also took advantage of the occasion to briefly talk about HTML5. In a post on the Hulu blog (which has curiously since been pulled, though it remains in the RSS feed), Hulu's VP of Product Eugene Wei took a moment for an "aside on HTML5," in which he said that while Hulu continues to monitor developments on HTML5, "as of now it doesn't yet meet all of our customers' needs."
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Linux

Submission + - New Visual Software Development Tool-> 1 1

TroysBucket writes: Illumination is a new tool for visually developing software. In an interesting twist, it takes the visual design of an application, and generates source code for the desired platform (currently Python/GTK, more planned such as Maemo & HTML5). Currently supports Linux, with plans for Windows and MacOS X.
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Government

Submission + - Rough Justice for Terry Childs->

snydeq writes: "Deep End's Paul Venezia sees significant negative ramifications for IT admins in the wake of yesterday's guilty verdict for Terry Childs on a count of 'denial of serivce.' Assuming the verdict is correct, Venezia writes, 'shouldn't the letter of the law be applied to other "denial of service" problems caused by the city while they pursued this case? In particular, to the person or persons who released hundreds passwords in public court filings in 2008 for causing a denial of service for the city's widespread VPN services? After all, once the story broke that a large list of usernames and passwords had been released to the public, the city had to take down its VPN services for days while they reset every password and communicated those changes to the users.' Worse, if upheld on appeal, the verdict puts a vast number of IT admins at risk. 'There are suddenly thousands of IT workers all over the country that are now guilty of this crime in a vast number of ways. If the letter of the law is what convicted Terry Childs, then the law is simply wrong.'"
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Submission + - Terry Childs Convicted. ->

dave596 writes: A jury has found Terry Childs, a former San Francisco Department of Technology employee accused of withholding the passwords to the city's main computer network in 2008, guilty of computer tampering.

The verdict was read in San Francisco Superior Court Tuesday afternoon.

After deliberating for nearly three days, the jury found Childs guilty of one felony count of computer tampering, and found true the allegation that the losses from the crime exceeded $200,000.

The trial spanned four months. Childs now faces a maximum of five years in prison at his sentencing.

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Image

How To Find Bad Programmers 359 359

AmberShah writes "The job post is your potential programmer's first impression of your company, so make it count with these offputting features. There are plenty of articles about recruiting great developers, but what if you are only interested in the crappy ones?" I think much of the industry is already following these guidelines.

Comment Actually it does... (Score 1) 309 309

Yeah, you didn't read the article.... So to spell it out. Bacteria lives on seaweed (and is able to eat it directly, and get energy from it). Japanese eats the seaweed, and thus the bacteria. The bacteria in the intestines swap notes with their cousins. Now part of the population in the intestine can do the digesting the seaweed trick. We have bacteria in and on our bodies. This bacteria outnumbers the cells we call "us". Most of this bacteria actually does a job, such as reducing inflammation around broken skin, or helping you digest your food. In the article, they were talking about gene transfer between bacteria living on the seaweed, and bacteria now found to be living in the intestines of some Japanese. Furthermore, current research suggests that humans "inherit" their population of intestinal flora from their mothers. So nowhere did anyone talk about phages, or any other virus. Accept you. I am saddened that a sufficient volume of accurate information, completely off topic, is "insightful".

Submission + - Chip and Pin Credit Card Attack Discovered ->

Fullers writes: The BBC reports that scientists from Cambridge University have discovered an attack for the 'Chip and Pin's system used to verify credit and debit cards in Europe. The hack appears to be a simple man-in-the-middle attack, using a laptop to allow the verification of any random pin for purchases. They are now working on miniaturizing the device to the size of a remote control.
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Security

Submission + - Botnet targets Web sites with junk SSL connection->

angry tapir writes: "More than 300 Web sites are being pestered by infected computers that are part of the Pushdo botnet. The FBI, Twitter and PayPal are among the sites being hit, although it doesn't appear the attacks are designed to knock the sites offline. Pusho appears to have been recently updated to cause computers infected with it to make SSL connections to various Web sites — the bots start to create an SSL connection and then disconnect, a process that is repeated."
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