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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 5 declined, 2 accepted (7 total, 28.57% accepted)

Australia

+ - Panic as Australian telco passes browsing data to the US-> 1

Submitted by
Twisted64
Twisted64 writes "Australia's largest telco, Telstra, has been frightening users of its mobile data services for the last week. Logging revealed that HTTP requests from a mobile device on Telstra's network were duplicated with a request from another server, located in Chicago.

Eyebrows were raised on the Whirlpool forums, with fears that Telstra was giving up Australian browsing data to a US company and therefore the US government. Following a well-worded letter Telstra revealed today that the reason for this behaviour is that the company is preparing an opt-in web filter.

Personally, while the idea of my browsing data being logged anywhere does not fill me with joy, the idea of the US government having access to it (randomised or not) is probably going to make me switch to an inferior carrier once my current plan ends."

Link to Original Source
Australia

+ - Australian telco causes minor panic while preparing web filter->

Submitted by
Twisted64
Twisted64 writes "Australia's largest telco, Telstra, has been frightening users of its mobile data services for the last week. Logging revealed that HTTP requests from a mobile device on Telstra's network were duplicated with a request from another server, located in Chicago.

Eyebrows were raised on the Whirlpool forums, with fears that Telstra was giving up Australian browsing data to a US company and therefore the US government. Following a well-worded letter Telstra revealed today that the reason for this behaviour is that the company is preparing an opt-in web filter.

Personally, while the idea of my browsing data being logged anywhere does not fill me with joy, the idea of the US government having access to it (randomised or not) is probably going to be enough to make me switch to an inferior carrier once my current plan ends."

Link to Original Source

+ - Efficiently matching users on a social website?

Submitted by
Twisted64
Twisted64 writes "After the Australian floods, a few sites have popped up, attempting to get flood victims in touch with their would-be saviours in the shortest time possible.These include qldfloods.org, floodaid.com.au, wikifloods.com.au, ozfloodhelp.org and mydisasterbuddy.com.

The sites use different methods to get people to register their needs or areas where they can provide assistance. Floodaid is a basic list for people to search through, wikifloods provides a bulletin board, and My Disaster Buddy is a basic networking site, allowing a basic search and requiring registration to get in contact (but after registration it automates the searching process, matching users based on their preferences).

What do you think is the best approach to getting people in contact with each other, with the minimum of fuss? It's clearly too late after the fact to throw together a website and expect it to be a polished production, but there is clearly a need that is being answered in several differing ways. Disasters will continue to happen, and plenty of people with a mobile phone have enough internet access to make these projects worthwhile."

+ - Creating an efficient social site?-> 1

Submitted by Twisted64
Twisted64 (837490) writes "After the Australian floods, a few sites have popped up, attempting to get flood victims in touch with their would-be saviours in the shortest time possible.These include qldfloods.org, floodaid.com.au, wikifloods.com.au, ozfloodhelp.org and mydisasterbuddy.com.

The sites use different methods to get people to register their needs or areas where they can provide assistance. Floodaid is a basic list for people to search through, wikifloods provides a bulletin board, and My Disaster Buddy is a basic networking site, requiring registration (but after registration it automates the searching process, matching users based on their preferences).

What do you think is the best approach to getting people in contact with each other, with the minimum of fuss? It's clearly too late after the fact to throw together a website and expect it to be a polished production, but there is clearly a need that is being answered in several differing ways. Disasters will continue to happen, and plenty of people with a mobile phone have enough internet access to make these projects worthwhile."

Link to Original Source
Australia

+ - "Friendly Networking" site for disaster victims->

Submitted by Twisted64
Twisted64 (837490) writes "Due to the ongoing saga of Australia's amazing floods, several pages have sprung up on facebook and other social networking sites to help volunteers assisting in flood cleanup. However, there are thousands of people more willing to lend a hand than donate money, and figuring out where to send them is a massive effort in coordination.

One new community-driven website, My Disaster Buddy, has done away with the donation element entirely with the aim of bringing the needy and the helpful together. Although it is still very basic, the intention is clear. The site allows users to check off their areas of possible assistance and then matches them with a user affected by the disaster. They can then interact on a one-to-one basis.

It figures that this more altruistic type of networking site would emerge in Australia, where the people are known for being both helpful and early adopters of technology, borne out by the torrent of youtube videos of cars being washed away and stories of men wading through chest deep water to rescue wallabies.

Obviously this kind of connectivity will only be effective in areas where most people have access to the internet, but can such a solution work?"

Link to Original Source
Australia

+ - A p2p solution for disaster recovery->

Submitted by Twisted64
Twisted64 (837490) writes "Due to the ongoing saga of Australia's amazing floods, several pages have sprung up on facebook and other social networking sites to help volunteers assisting in flood cleanup. However, there are thousands of people more willing to lend a hand than donate money, and figuring out where to send them is a massive effort in coordination.

One website has done away with the donation element entirely with the aim of bringing the needy and the helpful together. The site allows users to check off their areas of possible assistance and then matches them with a user affected by the disaster. They can then interact on a more personal one-to-one basis. While it may not make much sense for the initial cleanup job, this approach may have some long-term benefits after the media attention dies down.

It figures that this altruistic type of "helpful networking" site would emerge in Australia, where the people are known for being both helpful and early adopters of technology, views borne out by the torrent of youtube videos of cars being washed away and stories of men wading through chest deep water to rescue wallabies.

The site does seem a touch slow, so here's the Coral Cache link."

Link to Original Source

+ - "howto" website created for Australian voters

Submitted by Twisted64
Twisted64 (837490) writes "If you're interested in voting below the line in the upcoming federal election in Australia, but don't want to waste time in the booth individually ranking up to 76 candidates (for the unfortunates in New South Wales), then Cameron McCormack's website may have what you need. The website allows voters to set their preferences beforehand, dragging and dropping Stephen Conroy at the bottom of the barrel and thrusting the Sex Party into pole position (as an utterly random example). Once preferences are set, the site can generate a pdf to be printed and taken to the booth.

There's also something to educate the above-the-line voters — if you check the box for your single party of choice, the site will fill out the effective party preferences below the line. This shows that a vote for The Climate Sceptics hands first preferences to Family First, and so on.

The website claims not to harvest voting information, but for the paranoid it recommends printing out a blank ballot sheet and copying your preferences from the screen. There is also a button to set up a donkey vote when in the ballot view, in case you have trouble counting from 1 to 100."

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