Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:I prefer to browse real bookstores (Score 2) 83

by Tumbleweed (#46744313) Attached to: Seattle Bookstores Embrace Amazon.com

Amazon does have tons of books I might not find otherwise, but I still love just wandering around in a bookstore for hours, just browsing. I've found a number of great books that way, that I likely never would have seen just searching a website.

While I find books that way, too, I tend to find a LOT more stuff I like because of the recommendations on Amazon. Those algorithms are scary good nowadays.

Comment: Re:Politics as usuall (Score 1) 721

by Tumbleweed (#46719531) Attached to: Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

Some got it through the exchanges, some got it through their employer, and some got on Medicare. Apparently the CBO was surprised by how many people signed up through their employer; they calculated it would be about the same amount, but that shot up a lot; hard to say why at this point, but I'm sure we'll get all the details pretty soon; everyone is obsessed with trying to either prove or disprove it's working.

Comment: Re:Politics as usuall (Score 1) 721

by Tumbleweed (#46718519) Attached to: Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

millions are MUCH better off by not being denied health care for pre-existing conditions, being able to stay on their parent's healthcare plans, etc.

You sound very well-informed. Would you mind sharing with the rest of us the data source you used to determine that "millions" are better off? Even a rough count for each one of the categories you mention would be great as well. Thanks.

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyli...

From a study done by Rand, over 9 million people have health insurance than did before.

Comment: Re:Politics as usuall (Score 2, Insightful) 721

by Tumbleweed (#46717155) Attached to: Can the ObamaCare Enrollment Numbers Be Believed?

Like most numbers that come out of government, it takes a bit of creative license. Both major parties have mastered this deception. The real question is... Are we better off now that this law is in place? To which I have to think, probably not.

"Probably not?" You're going to have to explain that one. Maybe some people are worse off, but millions are MUCH better off by not being denied health care for pre-existing conditions, being able to stay on their parent's healthcare plans, etc.

Granted, this IS a right-wing change to health insurance (from the previous generation of right-wingers, not the Tea Party wacko set we have now). This is a gimme to health care insurers, with no single payer, etc. It's a single step, but it's a good one until the Tea Party flames out and we can get back to having a somewhat functional Congress again. That's going to be a long time in coming, I suspect, so for now, it seems as good as we're going to get.

Comment: Re:So If I Drop My Phone (Score 1) 62

I never said it would fail on its own as a device, I said it would fail on the points I listed, the third point being the most important if it's not intended for the mass market.

I suppose if you think that is a big reason people want a modular phone, then sure. It's not even on the list of reasons why I'd want a modular phone. They should probably do some polling to find out WHY people want a modular phone before they make one. :)

Comment: Re:So If I Drop My Phone (Score 2) 62

If it's not intended for the masses, then it's going to fail on all important points:

- it will be bigger/thicker than current all-in-one phones because each module will be its own box with its own case and you need space for the magnets and inter-modular connections
- it means it will cost even more than current all-in-one phones
- it means it won't get manufactured in enough quantities to make a difference in the waste produced by all-in-one phones

Your reasons for it to fail (as listed here) are still reasons that would make a device _INTENDED FOR THE MASSES_ fail. There are products that are intended for niche markets that still succeed, and this project will succeed or fail based on those criteria, not your strawman criteria.

Comment: all too common view on Snowden (Score 5, Insightful) 289

by Tumbleweed (#46575571) Attached to: Jimmy Carter: Snowden Disclosures Are 'Good For Americans To Know'

Politicians are quick to say the NSA has gone too far, but none of them have the balls to say Snowden should be pardoned. Grow some balls. He apparently tried several times to bring his concerns to his superiors, only to be shut down. If he didn't do what he did, we would not know what we know, or even be having this discussion. There's no need to make him a martyr. He did what was right.

Comment: Re:Next up: a direct detection (Score 1) 269

by Tumbleweed (#46508827) Attached to: Big Bang's Smoking Gun Found

A direct detection of a gravitational wave moving the mirrors of a large scale interferometer is up next. In the next few years, Advanced LIGO (US), Advanced Virgo (Italy) and KAGRA (Japan) will come online with the hope of directly detecting gravitational waves from sources such as supernovae and coalescing binary star systems. With this kind of network, it will then be possible to coordinate both electromagnetic and gravitational searches of our sky. This is useful for many reasons, one of which is that it lets us listen to the sound of black holes colliding where no light escapes.

Exciting times!

Plus we'll finally be able properly calibrate that DHD we found...

"The most important thing in a man is not what he knows, but what he is." -- Narciso Yepes

Working...