Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Everything old is new again - Emplant (Score 1) 319

by TuballoyThunder (#45816075) Attached to: PC Plus Packs Windows and Android Into Same Machine
I remember the Zenith Z-100 had dual processors, but I don't recall if you could get them going simultaneously. There were ISA cards for PCs (one of them was the Baby Blue card) that allowed CP/M to run on a PC.

Of course, the IBM mainframes running VM ran multiple OSes. Definitely not a new idea.

Comment: A Million Random Digits (Score 1) 98

by TuballoyThunder (#44589849) Attached to: Amazon Selects Their Favorite Fake Customer Reviews
My favorite: A Million Random Digits with 100,000 Normal Deviates

The book is a promising reference concept, but the execution is somewhat sloppy. Whatever generator they used was not fully tested. The bulk of each page seems random enough. However at the lower left and lower right of alternate pages, the number is found to increment directly.

Comment: Re:rsnapshot (Score 1) 304

by TuballoyThunder (#39536515) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: It's World Backup Day; How Do You Back Up?
What is your rebuild time like on the 10x2TB? I have a 4x1TB RAID5 array and the rebuild time is getting a bit long. With current drive capacities, my original motivation for going to RAID5 is no longer valid, so I'm thinking about splitting the data onto two 2x2TB RAID1 arrays instead.
Social Networks

Meg Whitman Campaign Shows How Not To Use Twitter 147

Posted by samzenpus
from the type-slower dept.
tsamsoniw writes "California gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman's campaign team attempted to share with her Twitter followers an endorsement from a police association. Unfortunately, the campaign press secretary entered an incorrect or incomplete Bit.ly URL in the Tweet, which took clickers to a YouTube video featuring a bespectacled, long-haired Japanese man in a tutu and leggings rocking out on a bass guitar. And for whatever reason, the Tweet, which went out on the 18th, has remained active through today."
Crime

Girls Bugged Teachers' Staff Room 227

Posted by samzenpus
from the making-the-grade dept.
A pair of enterprising Swedish schoolgirls ended up in court after they were caught bugging their teachers break room. The duo hoped they would hear discussions about upcoming tests and school work, allowing them to get better grades. It worked until one of them decided to brag about it on Facebook, and the authorities were called in. The girls were charged with trespassing and fined 2,000 kronor ($270) each in Stockholm District Court.

Comment: The system is broken (Score 4, Insightful) 135

by TuballoyThunder (#33250346) Attached to: EFF Asks Verizon Whether Etisalat Deserves CA Trust
There are so many trusted certificate signing authorities that I believe the trust system is untrustworthy. I counted over 40 certificate authorities in Mozilla and I did not make it past the letter "I' in the list of trusted CA's. Throw in the intermediate CA's and the problem gets worse. Lets assume that all CA's are trustworthy. Furthermore, assume that there is a 1 in a million chance for any individual CA in any given year to make a mistake. A system of 100 CA's would have a 1 in 10,000 chance of making a mistake. Many of the CA are regionally focused and it makes no sense why a user should trust all CA's equally.

The following changes could be useful:

  • selectively prune the trust hierarchy
  • flag certificates that change (there are addons)
  • specify the maximum path length you are willing to trust
  • Be able to assign a trust weight to a CA

Comment: Re:Huh? (Score 2, Interesting) 139

by TuballoyThunder (#33094832) Attached to: US Ability To Identify Source of Nuclear Weapons Decays
However, if you are putting together a forensic program you need to be able to assess bombs made with Pu or U or both. Even if you could identify the reactor or mine that the fissile material came from, that does not tell you who built the weapon. There are many factors that a forensic capability has to account for.

Nuclear Weapons Incident Response

The Nuclear Weapons Incident Response (NWIR) Program serves as the United States’ primary capability for responding to and mitigating nuclear and radiological incidents worldwide. The FY 2009 Request for these activities is $221.9 million, of which $31.7 million is dedicated to the continued implementation of two national security initiatives that will strengthen the Nation’s emergency response capabilities—the National Technical Nuclear Forensics (NTNF) and the Stabilization Implementation programs.

In FY2009 alone there was a sizable chunk of money spent. You should implement you concept and sell it to the USG. Otherwise, please do not insult the people who are working on this program.

Comment: Re:Huh? (Score 4, Interesting) 139

by TuballoyThunder (#33092714) Attached to: US Ability To Identify Source of Nuclear Weapons Decays
And please explain how alpha mass spec analysis of spent fuel from a reactor would help with a U235 based weapon. Also, please explain how you would back out the fractionation of the debris. For extra credit, you can explain how activation products can facilitate your analysis.

Also, Sandia is not the design lab you are looking for. You are confusing them with Los Alamos and Livermore.

I respect the fact that you have a four digit UID, but the problem is not as trivial as you make it out to be.

Comment: Terrible idea (Score 4, Insightful) 273

I think the concept behind the .xxx domain has the potential of leading the internet down a dangerous path. If the other TLD's are forced by their governing entity, e.g. the US government for the .com TLD, to prohibit pornographic content, the precedent will be set to segregate and regulate content.
Linux Business

Hemisphere Games Reveals Osmos Linux Sales Numbers 131

Posted by Soulskill
from the more-than-a-little-less-than-a-lot dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Hemisphere Games analyzes the sales numbers for their Linux port of Osmos and ask themselves, 'Is it worth porting games to Linux?' The short, simple answer is 'yes.' Breakdown and details in the post." A few other interesting details: the port took them about two man-months of work, the day they released for Linux was their single best sales day ever, and they got a surprising amount of interest from Russia and Eastern Europe. Their data only reflects sales through their website, and they make the point that "the lack of a strong Linux portal makes it a much less 'competitive' OS for commercial development." Hopefully someday the rumored Steam Linux client will help to solve that.

Comment: Quixotic Attempt I'm Afraid (Score 4, Interesting) 162

by TuballoyThunder (#32439750) Attached to: India Attempts To Derail ACTA
I'm glad India is taking a stand that supports its national interests and that position coincides with my belief that intellectual property rights have gone to far. The big "however" is that India does not have a great success rate of stopping a treaty. They did not sign the NPT nor the CTBT and the NPT is in force and the CTBT would be if it was not for the Annex II requirement.

The only thing that will kill the ACTA treaty is if a significant number of countries refuse to sign it or reject it during ratification. Unfortunately, I fear that any US administration would gladly sign the treaty and the US Senate would readily ratify it. If only the treaty would harm the gay unborn whales...

Science

Why the First Cowboy To Draw Always Gets Shot 398

Posted by timothy
from the more-guns-less-crime dept.
cremeglace writes "Have you ever noticed that the first cowboy to draw his gun in a Hollywood Western is invariably the one to get shot? Nobel-winning physicist Niels Bohr did, once arranging mock duels to test the validity of this cinematic curiosity. Researchers have now confirmed that people indeed move faster if they are reacting, rather than acting first."
Games

The Murky Origins of Zork's Name 70

Posted by Soulskill
from the murky-enough-for-a-grue dept.
mjn writes "Computational media researcher Nick Montfort traces the murky origins of Zork's name. It's well known that the word was used in MIT hacker jargon around that time, but how did it get there? Candidates are the term 'zorch' from late 1950s DIY electronics slang, the use of the term as a placeholder in some early 1970s textbooks, the typo a QWERTY user would get if he typed 'work' on an AZERTY keyboard, and several uses in obscure sci-fi. No solid answers so far, though, as there are problems with many of the possible explanations that would have made MIT hackers unlikely to have run across them at the right time."

"The geeks shall inherit the earth." -- Karl Lehenbauer

Working...