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PC Games (Games)

Building the Sports MMO Genre 52

Kheldon writes to point out an interview with David Chang of GamesCampus about the up-and-coming sports MMO genre. He also talks about their efforts to bring older demographics into gaming. Quoting: "One of the things about the baseball game in particular that's so great is that there is a leveling component, not just to the team, but also to players. So you're exactly right in terms of the persistence. We want people to not just play a baseball game, but ... to grow their team and their players over time. So, there are things where if you win a game, that's how you gain experience points. If you win against a higher level opponent, you get more experience points; if you bottom feed and you take advantage of lower-level players, you don't get as much, and so on. There are a lot of MMO-type concepts in the game. If you're talking about individual players, if you hit a lot of homeruns, or if you steal a lot of bases, your power or your stealing stat will increase over each season."

Comment Tried this before, didn't work so well (Score 2, Interesting) 210

We made something like this some years ago. We submerged a MB in oil and put the whole thing in a freezer. It worked great, until the oil penetrated in between the pci card slots (yes, it was an old computer)and MB. This also affected the ram slots. This made the electrical connection between ramMB and pciMB pretty useless after a while, effectively shutting the thing down. We soldered the ram and pci cards to the motherboard, and this solved the problem.
Censorship

Submission + - Digg listened, the digital revolt succeeds

An anonymous reader writes: From Kevin Rose' blog on dig: Today was an insane day. And as the founder of Digg, I just wanted to post my thoughts... In building and shaping the site I've always tried to stay as hands on as possible. We've always given site moderation (digging/burying) power to the community. Occasionally we step in to remove stories that violate our terms of use (eg. linking to pornography, illegal downloads, racial hate sites, etc.). So today was a difficult day for us. We had to decide whether to remove stories containing a single code based on a cease and desist declaration. We had to make a call, and in our desire to avoid a scenario where Digg would be interrupted or shut down, we decided to comply and remove the stories with the code. But now, after seeing hundreds of stories and reading thousands of comments, you've made it clear. You'd rather see Digg go down fighting than bow down to a bigger company. We hear you, and effective immediately we won't delete stories or comments containing the code and will deal with whatever the consequences might be. If we lose, then what the hell, at least we died trying. Digg on, Kevin

To be or not to be, that is the bottom line.

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