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Programming

Will Google's Dart Language Replace Javascript? (Video) 130

Posted by Roblimo
from the shall-we-play-darts-or-javascripts-this-evening-at-the-pub? dept.
Seth Ladd, Google Web engineer and Chrome Developer Advocate, is today's interviewee. He's talking about Dart, which Wikipedia says is 'an open-source Web programming language developed by Google.' The Wikipedia article goes on to say Dart was unveiled at the GOTO conference in Aarhus, October 10–12, 2011, and that the goal of Dart is 'ultimately to replace JavaScript as the lingua franca of web development on the open web platform.' A bold aim, indeed. Last month (June, 2014), InfoWorld ran an article by Paul Krill headlined, Google's Go language on the rise, but Dart is stalling. Seth Ladd, unlike Paul Krill, is obviously rah-rah about Dart -- which is as it should be, since that's his job -- and seems to think it has a growing community and a strong place in the future of Web programming. For more about Dart, scroll down to watch Tim Lord's video interview with Seth -- or read the transcript, if you prefer. (Alternate Video Link)

Comment: Re:What we need... (Score 1) 232

by Trogre (#47395645) Attached to: Radar Changing the Face of Cycling

The problem is that there are no license requirements for bikes, so many riders are totally unaware of the actual laws, and often highly inexperienced..
Drivers at least have to pass a test, and while there are plenty of bad drivers they should at least have some experience and understanding of the rules.

Well the solution to this is fairly clear...

Comment: Summertime fireworks (Score 1) 328

by Trogre (#47381009) Attached to: On 4th of July:

While I don't celebrate 4th of July (not American) I've always thought that mid-summer was an awkward time to hold fireworks displays.

By the time it's dark enough to effectively set off fireworks it's well past kids bedtimes and noise becomes a large consideration.

In my southern-hemisphere country we celebrate Guy Fawkes (or the failure thereof) on 5th November but that's of course close to our summertime so we have the same problem.

The UK seems to have gotten that right - Guy Fawkes in late autumn when it's dark in the evenings but not freezing cold.

Comment: CFL (Score 1) 196

by Trogre (#47366405) Attached to: The lightbulb I've most recently acquired ...

'twas a CFL, or more specifically a box of six at about $5 each. it took a while before I settled on a brand that lasted longer than six months.

I have bought a few LED ones too - they have good emitters, but the cheap mains capacitors in the ballasts let them down, blowing after a relatively short period.

I would still really like to see CFL and LED bulbs come out with separate ballasts. Then you can just replace the part that's failed.

Comment: Priorities (Score 1) 427

by Trogre (#47320333) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Would It Take For You To Buy a Smartwatch?

Here's my priorities for a smart-watch, in decreasing order of importance. Satisfy all of these and I'll consider wearing one:

  1. Battery life. Useless if it needs charging every day or two.
  2. Responsiveness. Staring blankly at a spinner while the watch synchronizes is a show-stopper.
  3. Security. How easy is it for someone else to connect to it or the controlling tablet/phone without my permission?
  4. Feature set. Yes, this is only fourth on the priority list.
  5. Price. I'd rather it didn't cost a month's wages to buy one, but if they become popular enough there will be a second-hand market soon enough.

Comment: Re:Doesn't this violate TOS? (Score 1) 184

by Trogre (#47295435) Attached to: EFF To Unveil Open Wireless Router For Open Wireless Movement

This.

ISPs are now a basic utility. They provide bandwidth through which you perform your online activities. That "series of tubes" analogy, while simplistic, applies quite well here. You're renting a small tube.

In no way should a utility be liable for the actions of its customers. When a psychopath electrocutes puppies in their garage is the electricity company held liable?
When someone floods their neighbours basement with a garden hose is the water company liable?
Then it should not be so for ISPs, who should as a result have no just cause to snoop on what goes through their "tubes".

Legally this isn't the case in most jurisdictions, but it damn well should be.

"But this one goes to eleven." -- Nigel Tufnel

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