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Comment Interpreting requirements (Score 1) 242

I go through recruiters. With X years of programming experience, they come to me. But HR are the ones who gave them the job requirements, usually.

I've been around long enough, though, that I can interpret what HR says into what's actually needed. 5 years of jQuery experience? How about 15 years of object-oriented javascript programming, that oughta be good. I can familiarize myself with a specific library as needed.

Reading through the job requirements from a recruiter is like being at the end of a game of telephone - you have to guess what the actual intent is, see if it's a job you really want, and if it's something you think you're qualified for.

Comment Network Basics (Score 1) 302

They ought to know the basics of how a network is put together. Understand vocabulary like router, server, LAN, WAN, ethernet, packet. Not saying they're all going to be future sysadmins, but people who understand how data gets from one place to another definitely have an advantage in today's world.

Comment Re:No. (Score 1) 507

I work on one of several teams adding features to huge, complex software suite. I don't know how well Agile would work when creating a new application from scratch, but for adding features to an existing program it works really well. The methodology helps us keep a rein on our scope and has greatly improved our interoperability with the other teams. With the goal that a given feature has to be releasable by the end of sprint 4, we're releasing small, working features more often instead of massive, buggy features a couple times a year.

Comment Got more offers by not being interested (Score 2) 227

Last year I realized that I'd never changed my LinkedIn job profile info to "not interested" after starting my new job a year earlier. I'd been getting a lot of pings from recruiters, and I thought that might discourage them. Nope. Saying I wasn't interested made the recruiters even more interested in me!

Which would be great if any of them had a job better than my current one, but they never do. Everything is more boring work I'm less qualified for, for less pay.

Comment Re:Yahoo and HP (Score 1) 332

I think we're going to see a lot of disruption in enterprise software. A lot of companies are currently resting on past success, counting on the fact that it's really hard for companies to completely replace critical business software.

At the same time, innovations in development frameworks, team management, and a better understanding of UX are allowing upstarts to create better enterprise applications.

I'm guessing Salesforce might not be around 10 years from now.

Comment Re:Well Duh (Score 1) 454

Even the government is culpable. The national lab where I live has frozen wages so many times that the PhD's working there are on the bottom end of the pay scale for people with their degrees.

Mind you, I have to wonder where those people on the top end are. Really, who *is* hiring PhD chemists and physicists and paying them so well?

Comment Re:There's a clue shortage on the hirEE side (Score 1) 574

I recently updated my LinkedIn settings to say "don't contact me about job opportunities." I like my current job and don't expect to find a better deal anywhere else (decent salary, great coworkers, WFH).

As soon as I put up the "don't contact me" marker, the number of pings I get from recruiters doubled. Still offering the same depressing-sounding jobs with long commutes. I guess saying you're not interested piques their interest.

Comment Re:Genius! (Score 1) 132

There are many arguments against adding the IDE, but I don't agree with this one. People said the same thing when Google came out with Gmail. "We've already got hotmail and yahoo and a million other free email services. Why do we need another?" If this tool is good enough or simple enough to use that it becomes ubiquitous, then it doesn't matter what's already out there.

Comment Yes, if you're a tinkerer (Score 1) 421

I got one several months ago because I wanted to try building apps for it. If you absolutely have to play around with the bleeding edge of technology, if you are willing to spend that kind of money on a device so that you can be the one who invents what it's used for, then go for it. Otherwise, it's not worth it.

How many NASA managers does it take to screw in a lightbulb? "That's a known problem... don't worry about it."

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