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+ - NASA tries to solve the problem of bug guts sticking to aircraft wings->

Submitted by mthwgk
mthwgk writes: While NASA may regularly carry out groundbreaking research, not all of it is something you’d want to go home and boast about. This week a team of engineers from NASA’s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project are working on just such a project, specifically: how to stop the guts of thousands of bugs building up on the leading edge of wings?
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+ - Mercedes-Benz Copies Tesla, Plans To Offer Home Energy Storage

Submitted by cartechboy
cartechboy writes: It's like a game of follow the leader. First, Tesla announced its Powerwall Batteries, and now Mercedes-Benz plans to follow suit by entering the energy-storage business as well. A division of parent company Daimler has been testing battery packs that can power houses, and plans to launch commercially in September. Supposedly a battery pack for "light industrial, commercial, and private" use is being tested with sizes ranging from 2.5 kWh to 5.9 kWh. While Tesla's building a massive Gigafactory to make all its batteries for its Powerwall and electric cars, it's unclear exactly how Daimler plans to produce its batteries in a larger-scale energy-storage operation. Will Daimler build a battery factory of its own, or is this a ploy to steal some headlines from Tesla while the topic is hot?

+ - GameStop swoops in to buy ThinkGeek for $140 million->

Submitted by Lirodon
Lirodon writes: Remember a few days ago, when our former parent company was the subject of a $122 million takeover bid by Hot Topic? Slashdot remembers. Well, another geeky retailer entered the fray in the battle for ThinkGeek, and won. GameStop will be acquiring Geeknet for $140 million. The video game retailer has promised synergies, such as in-store pickup and integration with its rewards program.
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+ - LG arbitrarily denying Android Lollipop update to the G2 in Canada?

Submitted by Lirodon
Lirodon writes: Its funky rear-mounted buttons may have left critics divided, but the LG G2 is still a pretty capable Android device. While it has gotten an update to Android 5.0 "Lollipop" in some major markets (including the United States, of course), one major holdout is Canada. Reports are surfacing that LG's Canadian subsidiary has decided not to release the update for unknown reasons.

But, what about custom ROMs? Well, they handled that too: they have refused to release Lollipop kernel source for the Canadian variant of the device. It is arbitrary actions like this that cause Android's fragmentation problems. A curious note, LG has not specifically made reference to the bugs other users have been having with the update.
Android

LG Arbitrarily Denying Android Lollipop Update To the G2 In Canada? 35

Posted by timothy
from the arbitrary-lines dept.
Lirodon writes: Its funky rear-mounted buttons may have left critics divided, but the LG G2 is still a pretty capable Android device. While it has gotten an update to Android 5.0 "Lollipop" in some major markets (including the United States, of course), one major holdout is Canada. Reports are surfacing that LG's Canadian subsidiary has decided not to release the update for unknown reasons. But, what about custom ROMs? Well, they handled that too: they have refused to release Lollipop kernel source for the Canadian variant of the device. It is arbitrary actions like this that cause Android's fragmentation problems. A curious note, LG has not specifically made reference to the bugs other users have been having with the update.

+ - Intel Adopts USB-C Connector For 40Gbps Thunderbolt 3, Supports USB 3.1, DP 1.2->

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid writes: The high speed Thunderbolt intereface standard, which is used for everything from hyper-fast external storage solutions to external graphics cards, has been slow to take off. You can blame the high-priced Thunderbolt peripherals and the uber-expensive cables (at last when compared to your garden variety USB cables).For most people, USB 3.0 is "good enough" and making a huge investment into the Thunderbolt ecosystem has been reserved for those in the professional video editing arena. However, Intel is looking to change all of that with Thunderbolt 3. Thunderbolt 3 once again doubles the maximum bandwidth, this time jumping from 20Gbps to a whopping 40Gbps. While that is impressive in its own right, the truly big news is that Thunderbolt 3 is moving away from the Mini DisplayPort connector and is instead adopting the USB-C connector. As a result Thunderbolt will also support USB 3.1 (which is currently spec'd at 10Gbps) and can optionally provide up to 100W of power (in compliance with the USB Power Delivery spec) to charge devices via USB-C (like the recently introduced 12-inch Apple MacBook).
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Google News Sci Tech: USB-C has already won - The Verge->

From feed by feedfeeder

Hot Hardware

USB-C has already won
The Verge
As it likes to do, Apple recently released a product before the world was ready. The new 12-inch MacBook has but a single port — unless you count the headphone jack — and it's a completely new connector that almost no one has ever used before, breaking...
Intel Announces Thunderbolt 3 With 40Gbps Bandwidth, USB Type-C ConnectorNDTV
New Thunderbolt USB is reversible and twice as fastIrish Examiner
Intel Announces Thunderbolt 3 With USB-C, Single-Cable Support for Dual 4K ... Mac Rumors
Computerworld-TechCrunch
all 63 news articles

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+ - The Bizarre Process We Use for Approving Exemptions to the DMCA->

Submitted by harrymcc
harrymcc writes: The Digital Millennium Copyright Act imposes severe penalties on those who overcome copy-protection technologies. It allows for exemptions for a variety of purposes--but in a weird proviso, those exemptions must be re-approved by the Librarian of Congress every three years. Over at Fast Company, Glenn Fleishman takes a look at this broken system and why it's so bad for our rights as consumers.
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+ - DARPA wants to make complex 3D printing trustworthy, dependable, safe->

Submitted by coondoggie
coondoggie writes: If additive manufacturing technologies like 3D printing are to become mainstream for complex engineering tasks – think building combat fighter aircraft wings or complete rocket engines – there needs to be a major uptick in the reliability and trustworthiness of such tools. That’s what researchers at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) aim to do with its Open Manufacturing program which this week announced new labs and other facilities that will be used to develop these additive technologies and prove whether or not they can be trusted for widespread use in complicated applications.
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+ - SOGo v2.3.0: The viable FOSS alternative to Microsoft Exchange->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: The Inverse team has just released SOGo v2.3 which features massively improved native Outlook compatibility, improved Enterprise Active``Sync support, Debian Jessie and RHEL 7 support and many enhancements and bug fixes.
With Samba 4 and OpenChange integration, Microsoft Outlook 2003 to 2013 can talk directly to SOGo — just like if it was a Microsoft Exchange server. No plugins are required in Outlook to make this work. A virtual appliance with everything installed and configured is available for download, for testing purposes.

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The Courts

Blackberry Defeats Typo In Court, Typo To Discontinue Sales of Keyboard 39

Posted by timothy
from the one-way-or-another-it's-over dept.
New submitter juniorkindergarten writes: Blackberry and Typo have reached a final settlement that effectively ends Typo selling its iPhone keyboard accessory. Blackberry took Typo to court for twice for patent infringement over the copying of Blackberry's keyboard design. Blackberry and Typo first battled it out in court, with Typo losing for copying the Blackberry Q10 keyboard design. Typo redesigned its keyboard, and again Blackberry sued them for patent infringement. The final result is that Typo cannot sell keyboards for screens less than 7.9", but can still sell keyboards for the iPad and iPad air. Exact terms were not disclosed.

+ - Who's behind mysterious flights over US cities? FBI->

Submitted by kaizendojo
kaizendojo writes: The FBI is operating a small air force with scores of low-flying planes across the country carrying video and, at times, cellphone surveillance technology — all hidden behind fictitious companies that are fronts for the government, The Associated Press has learned.

The planes' surveillance equipment is generally used without a judge's approval, and the FBI said the flights are used for specific, ongoing investigations. In a recent 30-day period, the agency flew above more than 30 cities in 11 states across the country, an AP review found.

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+ - Wider Lanes Make City Streets More Dangerous

Submitted by HughPickens.com
HughPickens.com writes: Angie Schmitt writes in Streetsblog USA that city streets with the widest lanes — 12 feet or wider — are associated with greater crash rates and higher impact speeds and that there is hard evidence that wider lanes increase risk on city streets. Dewan Masud Karim conducted a wide-ranging review of existing research as well as an examination of crash databases in two cities, taking into consideration 190 randomly selected intersections in Tokyo and 70 in Toronto. Looking at the crash databases, Karim found that collision rates escalate as lane widths exceed about 10.5 feet. According to Karim "human behavior is impacted by the street environment, and narrower lanes in urban areas result in less aggressive driving and more ability to slow or stop a vehicle over a short distance to avoid collision. Designers of streets can utilize the “unused space” to provide an enhanced public realm, including cycling facilities and wider sidewalks, or to save money on the asphalt not used by motorists." Karim concluded that there is a sweet spot for lane widths on city streets, between about 10 and 10.5 feet.

According to Jeff Speck the fundamental error that underlies the practice of traffic engineering is an outright refusal to acknowledge that human behavior is impacted by its environment and it applies to safety planning, as traffic engineers, designing for the drunk who's texting at midnight, widen our city streets so that the things that drivers might hit are further away. "When lanes are built too wide, many bad things happen. In a sentence: pedestrians are forced to walk further across streets on which cars are moving too fast and bikes don't fit," writes Speck adding that a pedestrian hit by a car traveling 30 mph at the time of impact is between seven and nine times as likely to be killed as one hit by a car traveling 20 mph This tremendously sharp upward fatality curve means that, at urban motoring speeds, every single mile per hour counts. "Every urban 12-foot lane that is not narrowed to 10 feet represents a form of criminal negligence; every injury and death, perhaps avoidable, not avoided—by choice."

+ - New SOHO Router Security Audit Uncovers Over 60 Flaws In 22 Models->

Submitted by itwbennett
itwbennett writes: In yet another testament to the awful state of home router security, a group of security researchers uncovered more than 60 vulnerabilities in 22 router models from different vendors, most of which were distributed by ISPs to customers. The researchers performed the manual security review in preparation for their master’s thesis in IT security at Universidad Europea de Madrid in Spain. They published details about the vulnerabilities they found Sunday on the Full Disclosure security mailing list.
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+ - Has SoundHound's New Hound Service Outdone Siri?->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes: "Hound can parse what you say even when you add complex criteria, exclusions, and negation to the question. For example, ask one of the voice recognition platforms you currently use to "show restaurants that aren't Chinese food" and the platform will latch onto keywords and list Chinese restaurants. Hound understands that negation. Like Siri, it also understands previous question criteria, so asking "What is the population of Japan?" and then "What about China?" gives the population of China. Leave out context and add criteria, it doesn't matter: I saw a demonstration of Hound handling the dizzying request "Give me a hotel room that's more than $300 but less than $400, has WiFi, has air conditioning, picks me up from the airport, and don't show me rooms that don't have air conditioning" —it gave a list of accurate results within a few seconds."
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