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Comment: It was never about the costs (Score 2) 234

by Trachman (#48433371) Attached to: Swedish Court Refuses To Revoke Julian Assange's Arrest Warrant

It was about keeping him (and others for that matter) in line. And making example of him being grounded, cuffed, locked, deported, tried and all of it televised.

If you let one disobey, more of those will appear, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

Either way, system win. Assange's statue of limitations ends in 2022, which is, what, 10 years being locked in one room?

If he does survive, he will be an example for others. Actually he already was an example, which keeps giving.

Comment: Let me get it straight (Score 1) 112

by Trachman (#48423171) Attached to: Blowing On Money To Tell If It Is Counterfeit

If a crafty person prints $20 bill on the printer, he is a criminal and a counterfeiter.

When central banks create money by simply changing the numbers in the computer, it is called quantitative easy.

Oh, wait. We are being told that cash is getting unpopular, and paying with electronic means is so hot right now.

Comment: Hydrogen is a nice alternative (Score 2, Interesting) 192

by Trachman (#48405855) Attached to: Toyota Names Upcoming Hydrogen Fuel Cell Car

Toyota is currently considered as one of the best companies and great strategic planners. Pioneers too. I did follow the development of this innovation and it is worth saying that Toyota has invested billions of dollars into this project. The same way they have invested in gas-hybrid prototype currently known as Prius.

There will be Hydrogen energy skeptics, the same way there was a reasonable skepticism towards electric cars. Most of the skeptic comments coming from the opponents of electric cars are actually, valid. Such as electric cars are being charged with the coal burned electricity.

The key risk will be mentioned that Hydrogen is extremely volatile and combustive. BMW has developed hydrogen powered cars long time ago. Toyota has actually solved the issue by developing fuel cell. Fuel cell basically is a sponge of certain minerals which chemically absorbs hydrogen so that it is not that volatile.

I am taking a risk and predicting that in ten and fifteen years there will be marketed systems that will convert photovoltaic energy to hydrogen, which will be used to fill Hydrogen cars.

Do not listen too seriously to those who say that there will be no hydrogen refill stations. A decade ago there were not too many electricity recharge stations (though you could recharge your car home). I am sure Toyota has a plan in their sleeve to be in the hydrogen business.

While former criticism for current EV cars was valid, there will be valid complains for Hydrogen cars, let's not forget the key thing: competition is actually a good thing. Embrace it, because even if you are driving a gas car, hydrogen cars will keep the price of gas down due to lower oil demand. Win-win.

Comment: All tech companies move on each other (Score 1) 91

by Trachman (#48401581) Attached to: Facebook Planning Office Version To Rival LinkedIn, Google

However I doubt that I would like my colleagues and Linkedin business contacts to know about my: racing hamster, gunpowder musket and jedi religion hobbies.

There is a reason people keep certain professional distance at work, distance about personal and private life.

As an employer I would like to know how many children, how many husbands my new prospective employee has, something that is not even an option at Linkedin.

Comment: Too much red tape for police? (Score 1) 231

by Trachman (#48353203) Attached to: Canadian Police Recommend Ending Anonymity On the Internet

In order to get information on specific request, police now needs to submit requests, fill paperwork, get approvals. Too much red tape! Police also wants easy access to all the data.

When police does get data using "black channels", they need to waste time to find (or make up) some sort of flaws or errors so that to present that flaw as a reason why data was identified and collected to begin with. It is just damn too complicated. More importantly, even police officers need to go through dozens of all kind of certifications, because only certified specialists can handle the evidence.

For example, police officers have to go through period "trainings" to use radar and alcohol tester. Using computer will also need to be certified, because a good attorney can defend in court that the data was not handled by certified specialist.

Internet ID, fortified with fingerprinting, face and eye retina scan will surely make CRMP work easier and would reduce administrative burden, eh?

Comment: Yes and No (Score 1) 79

Every time you leave an electronic imprint, such as the image of your face, tagged with your ID, it goes to the DATABASE.

People live with the understanding of intelligence gathering of the middle of last century. There has to be a building, it has to belong to some agency, the information is accumulated to the the files.

Everything is now gathered in DATABASES, accessible to all the thousands of agencies and is being analyzed and will be analyzed in the future to figure out relationships between elements of the database records.

Comment: Perhaps the answer is taxes (Score 2) 161

by Trachman (#48338305) Attached to: Florida-Based Magic Leap Builds Its Team With Bay Area Hires

While Florida is not the most attractive and friendly place to do business, but it surely beats California, which has for several years been elected as the worst place to do business, in the same bucket with New York and New Jersey.

Florida has no income tax, climate is subtropical and, more importantly, Florida is giving additional tax incentives to move jobs to Florida.

My own employer has opened office in Tampa and relocated 250 jobs from NJ; that is probably only the beginning.

Comment: Re:Naive optimism in headline (Score 1) 91

by Trachman (#48309225) Attached to: Photon Pair Coupled in Glass Fiber

Privacy is dead? At the minimum, photons can have their privacy.

Look at the topic the other way: the world that we know does rely on the privacy of quantum unpredictability, the idea that the photon spin cannot be snooped without altering it. The same world that you know without privacy in what quantum particles are doing would be behaving very differently, no need to explain if one has some familiarity with quantum mechanics.

+ - Photon interaction has been created in the fiber->

Submitted by Trachman
Trachman (3499895) writes "Austrian scientists discovered a way to couple photon pairs. During the coupling for two identical photons, under analysis, a phase is changed in one and, using the magic of the world of quantum mechanics, the phase of other photon also changes. Scientists predict that this can advance quantum optics, quantum computations and, in the nearest future, secure fiber networks from NSA and other self appointed nosy rulers of the world.

The question to the community is following: Is there anyone who can explain in simple terms the essence of the discovery and associated potential practical applications."

Link to Original Source

Comment: Gaseous Fentanyle (Score 1) 152

by Trachman (#48220805) Attached to: Incapacitating Chemical Agents: Coming Soon To Local Law Enforcement?

The mysterious gas is Fentanyle, in gaseus form, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F... .Fentanyle is 100 times more potent than morphine

This particular Fentanyle has been manufactured and supplied by one pharmaceutical manufacturer in Kaunas, Lithuania, albeit prior to 1991. There were investigative journalists who have covered this topic exhaustively, in details several years ago.

Fentanyle has been used in Nord Ost operation and it was not a success. Hundreds of hostages died from overdose and Russians do not like to bring this instance of heavy handed handling of situation.

Comment: G00gle: Self appointed jury, judge and custodian (Score 1) 144

by Trachman (#48133495) Attached to: Google Rejects 58% of "Right To Be Forgotten" Requests

They can do this until they get another legal spank once again. Who is Google anyway to decide the "public interest"? Since when the public interest trumps the private interest and how and why Google self-appointed to be the judge and the jury to decide what is relevant or what is not?

Comment: Saboteurs? More like daily bread and butter (Score 2) 228

by Trachman (#48119255) Attached to: Core Secrets: NSA Saboteurs In China and Germany

This is a classic way technical intelligence specialists operate. Lets analyze practical example: the target is a database. The potential attack vectors are following (but obviously not limited to): a)compromised hardware which allows to download data from the server b) compromised software which allows to download data from the server c) compromised specialist (s) which download the data d) intercepted communications,

Rule #1: any gathered data is verified by comparing it to independent source. Rule #2: the sources cannot know about each other. Only if these two rules are met the data can be considered as data which has passed basic verification. "Physical subversion", "blackmail", "infiltration" are day to day activities, the bread and butter, for all those agencies.

+ - For those who have nothing to hide, there is something you can lose->

Submitted by Trachman
Trachman (3499895) writes "Everytime there is a discussion about pervasive surveillance there is an undertone injected to the discussion: if you have nothing to hide then one has nothing to fear. We have learned about DEA using NSA capabilities for the parallel construction of the case. Washington Post has article about those who had nothing to fear and paid dearly — http://www.washingtonpost.com/..."
Link to Original Source

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