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Comment: Re:Generic Trademarks (Score 2) 356

by TorKlingberg (#35360260) Attached to: If App Store's Trademark Is Generic, So Is Windows'

Also, I would bet a reasonable amount of cash that if you did a survey of non-geek smartphone users, most would think "iPhone" to the prompt "App store".

I think the opposite is true. Geeks may know the difference between App Store, Marketplace, App Catalog, App World and Phone Marketplace, but most people don't.

Comment: Re:All OSX browsers are really slow here (Score 1) 84

by TorKlingberg (#35258498) Attached to: Facebook Develops HTML5 Gaming Benchmark

They used different hardware for Windows and OS X. It looks like the Mac is actually more powerful though, so the OSX browsers should score higher if they were equally efficient.

* For OS X: a MacBook Pro laptop, currently OS X 10.6.6, 4GB of RAM, 2.66 GHz Intel Core i7, and NVIDIA GT 330M with 512MB of RAM.
* For Windows: a Lenovo T410s laptop, currently Windows 7 Enterprise, 4GB of RAM, 2.53 GHz Intel Core i5, and NVIDIA NVS 3100M with 512MB of RAM.

Crime

Drunk Driver Mugshots Featured On Facebook 321

Posted by Soulskill
from the catching-you-at-your-best dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Get yourself a DUI and your mugshot may get some exposure on Facebook. That is, if you get caught in New Jersey by Evesham Township's police, which have begun posting mugshots of arrested people, convicted or not, on its Facebook page. Now, we know that if you get arrested, your privacy is pretty much limited to the brand of your underpants, but the local police department has started a controversy and may find itself in hot water. How much value does a public mugshot on Facebook have to the public? What privacy rights do you have if you get arrested?"
Patents

MPEG-LA Considering Patent Pool For VP8/WebM 399

Posted by kdawson
from the who-you-callin'-unencumbered dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Well, that didn't take long. Larry Horn, CEO of MPEG-LA, the consortium that controls the AVC/H.264 video standard, says the group is looking at creating a patent pool license for VP8 and WebM, Google's new open source, royalty-free HTML5 video format... So much for a Web video standard unencumbered by patent issues." We talked about VP8/WebM a couple of days ago when Google open sourced it. Reader Stoobalou points out another late-night email from Steve Jobs, who was asked to comment on VP8 vs. H.264. Jobs laconically sent a pointer to the technical analysis we linked before, where the poster says "VP8 copies way too much from H.264 for anyone sane to be comfortable with it, no matter whose word is behind the claim of being patent-free."

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