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Comment: Command line? (Score 3, Interesting) 170

by ToasterMonkey (#47849097) Attached to: Fedora To Get a New Partition Manager

I'm completely fine seeing things move away from the older "GUI driving non-interactive commands in the background" model, to GUIs and CLIs that are built on shared libraries, because that potentially gives us THREE usable interfaces. However, is it normal for a CLI to lag behind the GUI now in Linuxland?

I see that blivet comes from Anaconda, so I expect some integration there.
It seems like a good CLI could be used to avoid the awkward practice of writing out a kickstart partition fragment from the pre section. We could just drive Anaconda's partitioning directly from %pre with shell logic instead of pooping out Anaconda-ese to be parsed later.

So where's my damned anaconda partitioning CLI already, this would affect more [important] people than yet another partition GUI!!

Comment: Re:I understand the FAA's position... (Score 1) 222

by ToasterMonkey (#47843623) Attached to: FAA Scans the Internet For Drone Users; Sends Cease and Desist Letters

Do you feel that way about, say, grenades and stuff?

Oh God, don't go there, People defending the right of 70 pound gilrs to blow the head off of range instructors with automatic pistols on "Guns and God" vacations will ge really pissed now.

Amen, girls should weigh at least 75 pounds to blow the heads off range instructors, write your congressmen!

Comment: Re:My opinion on the matter. (Score 1) 826

by ToasterMonkey (#47754313) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

A properly designed browser using *nix philosophy wouldn't do those things directly, instead it would use plugins to add that functionality.

An init system should do one thing and do it well, manage the startup of services when called. A proper *nix designed system for monitoring and restart would CALL init, but it shouldn't BE init, otherwise it violates the principle of modularity.

Consider for example looking for all the active settings in a standard Linux config file:

grep -v ^# ldap.conf | tr -s '\n'

By using two standard tools you can do something pretty fancy, basically stripping out all the comments. Could grep be enhanced to include the newline trimming feature? Of course it could, but that's not grep's job, its purpose is to match things not trim things. By keeping the scope narrow you reduce the error space and provide a more flexible toolset.

If you design the monitoring system into init then it can't be used generically to monitor other things and you lose half the value of the tool you've created.

egrep -v '^#|^$' ldap.conf ?

You're deciding boundaries arbitrarily. For example, who decided all the functions of tr belong in one command? Why are we even comparing userland tools to system functions? Why do you use dd to do EBCDIC-ACSII translation instead of ... the translate command?

How old is SysV init? How has its "Well I assume I started something, JOB'S DONE!" interface with the rest of the system benefitted us all this time? How can you even connect that to something? You can't trust the exit codes from.. well anything, start/stop/or status because too many scripts just return 0. You can't trust status to exist everywhere or even work right. You can't trust a stop to actually kill all processes.

If nobody is going to make init in its current bounds _determinate_, then who really cares if the replacement is more or less modular.

Comment: Re:My opinion on the matter. (Score 2) 826

by ToasterMonkey (#47754153) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

What's funny is it actually has the ability, and nobody uses it except for gettys.

This. Actually, in RHEL/CentOS, you can simply run /etc/rc every minute via cron and it'll sync what's running with what's supposed to be, assuming things have been /sbin/service stopped. (And if they haven't been cleanly stopped, you need a specialized tool that understands how to *TEST* the service rather than rely on subsys.)

It's not THAT hard.

Let's use Apache as an example.
Typical Apache screw up... user reports site is not responding
apachectl restart says ports are already in use...

apachectl stop
pgrep httpd... see's the old httpd session leader and some friends chilling out. /facetokeyboard
"You stupid P.O.S."
pkill -9 httpd
apachectl start

Many of us have been here, and it's very dumb. A modernized service control system should have a basic two way channel to the daemons.
You stay on the line or get whacked, and while you're alive you deal with all your child process problems and let us know.
What's that specialized tool supposed to do that the service itself cannot? This really simple system lets you know all the shades of gray between "running" and "stopped"

Like:
"starting, but I need to do a consistency check, and this may take a while"
"running, sort of..."
"stopping, well I'm not available anymore, but you can't start me again yet"
"I know enough to stop trying on my own until an operator intervenes"

Comment: Re:My opinion on the matter. (Score 1) 826

by ToasterMonkey (#47753903) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

That sounds like a good way to create an infinite loop of crashing and restarting services.

I read about this sweet new trick in Windows 2000 where you can configure a number of automatic service restart attempts, the interval between them, and an interval in which that count might reset and start over if you want it to.

Honestly, I think the two "sides" here are really the one that has cursory knowledge of the evolution of other operating systems over the past two decades and the side that's basically 90's Linux-Amish.

Comment: Re:My opinion on the matter. (Score 1) 826

by ToasterMonkey (#47753601) Attached to: Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Nothing is broken with Linux. But by now I believe something very fundamental is broken in a highly dangerous fashion with the systemd developers. They hardly seem to qualify as UNIX folks at all with their mind-set....

Linux systems are basically the least unixy "unix-like" systems around. It's a bit late in the game to be a UNIX purist on Linux IMHO. Do what works best.

Comment: Re:Americans don't know what war really is... (Score 1) 419

by ToasterMonkey (#47680943) Attached to: Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

I've heard that a few times over the years. Americans don't know what war is like because we've never had to suffer it personally. Our soldiers always go somewhere else to fight.
So, I say this sounds like a perfect education. You kids like playing war? Lets go see what war really is because games & stories don't do it justice. Look it in the eyes and you won't treat it like a game anymore.

When they're adults, these kids will be able to look back and use this experience to make an informed decision on whether or not to fight in whatever conflict their country gets into. Sweden's next generation of decision makers will be better equipped because of the presence of these kid's experience.

If America did have a history of being trampled on, we'd be more nationalistic with a bigger military, and a long list of grievances to draw from and thirst for vengeance. I don't think anyone actually wants that.

Most Americans don't know what it's like to live in crime-ridden neighborhoods either, but if we all did, that does't mean our police would be less militarized, smaller, or kids would grow up and do less crime.

A least we are idealists. I know you want to think if we only knew war more personally we'd lose the will to fight, but that's not how it works. If every American soldier had to grow up with insecurity and death around every corner, things would be much worse when the time came to deploy them and that time would still come if you like it or not.

Do you suppose if your kid had his school blown up by some external threat, that would weigh against deciding to take up arms later in life? No.
If you want to show him someone else's blown up school and it makes you feel better, whatever. Thats like taking him past the bad side of town and saying don't join the police because THEY are fucked.

Comment: Re:Gettin All Up In Yo Biznis (Score 4, Interesting) 419

by ToasterMonkey (#47680053) Attached to: Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

Would you do it if they were reading comic books about war? Watching movies? Watching 50s movies with John Wayne about war? Reading novels about war? Playing war in the yard? If they started playing cops and robbers in the back yard with the neighbor kids, is it time to haul them off to a Scared Straight session at a prison, to impress upon them the harsh realities of a life of crime?

I think that every American should have to take a trip to the war zone to see what our tax dollars go to supporting.

Much more practical: send elected representatives on those trips.

Shut down the congressional cafeterias for a few months out of the year to pay for it, or IDK, tell them there's free hookers and blow in Libya.

Comment: Re:Why is (Score 1) 201

by ToasterMonkey (#47639111) Attached to: Netflix Now Works On Linux With HTML5 DRM Video Support In Chrome

Reed Hastings, CEO of Netflix, was also on the Board of Directors for Microsoft from 2007 through 2012.

So yes, they can.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reed_Hastings

So what's the theory for Netflix working fine on my PS4, Wii, Apple TV, iPhone, iPad, iMac, etc.?

Christ, nobody cares that strongly about Linux. I mean... that's why there's no conspiracy to exclude it... I'm sure you love it, but damn.

Comment: Re:Lessons for today's world (Score 3, Insightful) 165

by ToasterMonkey (#47579309) Attached to: Was America's Top Rocketeer a Communist Spy? The FBI Thought So

I wonder how many innocent people today have had themselves and their careers ruined by the NSA/GCHQ/TLA and how as a result we have all suffered by not benefiting from their work.

In an environment where you can be punished for your beliefs, is intelligence really the evil?

It's not the information that's to blame, it's what people do with it, and the worse people are, the less they'll need.
Think of the worst people throughout history, and imagine them making less informed decisions.

McCarthyism, Salem witch trials, Inquisitions

See, the problem wasn't solid information regarding who's a communist, who's a witch, or who's Muslim, the problem was the people punishing you if they thought you smelled like one.

Comment: Re:Great... (Score 1) 582

by ToasterMonkey (#47546515) Attached to: Satellite Images Show Russians Shelling Ukraine

I'll match American propaganda with some Russian propaganda. Please, actually READ IT? Huh? Willya please?

http://21stcenturywire.com/201...

I can't say WHO shot that airliner out of the sky, because there is no CONCLUSIVE evidence yet. But, there's a helluva lot of circumstantial evidence that points at Kiev.

Do you have any idea why Kiev had fighter jets shadowing that airliner? Neither do I, but that's a question that needs to be answered. And, why did Kiev order the airliner to alter it's filed flight plan, flying a couple hundred miles north of the normal flight path?

There are a lot of questions that need to be answered, and I'm pretty sure that some of those answers will be "Well, we've invested so much money into the Ukraine, we can't abandon the plan!"

Meh, that page criticizes made up thunder storms in one paragraph then claims SAM operators would not be able to visually identify a plane that day due to the weather.

The small target window... how is that different for any other AA site anywhere? Anyone can look up at a high altitude flight over their home and do simple mental math how much time one would have to operate one of these things. It's not much.

And the tailing fighter jets I was not previously aware of, only increase the odds in my mind that rebels mistook this for a military plane.

There's spin... and then there's Spin. One possibility is... another real possibility is!!! And something else that could have happened is... retired Russian air force colonel says a fighter jet shot it, and then a BUK was ordered to finish it! Look here, at one possible map, from one source! (those are not my words!)

That thing is just conspiracy theory soup... It was accidentally shot down, period. I can speak with as much authority on this matter as random retired colonel somewhere in Russia. Why it's going from, and I'll leave it at SOMEONE, accidentally shooting it down to claims that it was all complexly orchestrated and done on purpose is just bizarre. Hanlon's razor - it was an accident to shoot down a loaded civilian jetliner. PERIOD.

Comment: Re:Beating aroud the bush (Score 1) 120

This article sounds like it is beating around the bush, alluding to but never mentioning the discovery of "Parallel Construction". Its a policy whereby illegal evidence is snuck into court by using it to find other evidence and not informing the courts, defendants and sometimes not even prosecutors where the initial leads came from. An example would be there is a suspected drug runner, NSA intercepts are used to tap his phone & internet communications. They find what they believe is a date and time where the runner will be carrying some drugs in their car, they then have some officers make up an excuse to pull them over and search their car. They conveniently "forget" however to tell anyone outside the law enforcement/intelligence community that their initial lead was based on warrant-less searches. And apparently many have the gall to say that it is a "It's decades old, a bedrock concept.", something tells me that if government agencies have to keep it secret from the courts its almost certainly illegal.

From the perspective of the agency doing the enforcement and helping bring a case to court, what's the difference between this and any other lead that's not directly usable as evidence, such as an anonymous tip? If the evidence is all properly and legally obtained, well I'm not sure this notion of an "illegal" tip is relevant.

Look, I don't know the exact methods used to do parallel construction, but I do see how it can be done legally, and IMO not infringing on your rights. There shouldn't be a distinction between me telling police there's a lot of cars stopping by my neighbors which is WEIRD and me doing the same with positive conformation in my opinion of criminal activity, regardless the particular methods I used to build that confidence. Obviously my confidence is not transitive, and I'd only share what I could, in a manner that protects my ass. The NSA is doing the same I'd imagine, and if you have a problem with THEIR methods, the drug case is not the proper venue to bring it up.

Comment: Re:What's it going to take? (Score 1) 120

This is the entire reason that the Department of Homeland Security was created, to bring all intelligence about threats to the United States under one body.

That's not true... The DHS absorbed INS, USCIS, Customs, Border Patrol, Coast Guard, Secret Service, and probably some other notable stuff I'm too lazy to look up. If you need help spotting the theme, it's enforcement.

There may be more collaboration between members of the intelligence community, which DHS is a party to but that's not the reason DHS was created.

Comment: Re:I don't see the problem. (Score 5, Insightful) 667

by ToasterMonkey (#47497215) Attached to: Russian Government Edits Wikipedia On Flight MH17

False equivalence.

Sides are not equally wrong, and truth is not somewhere in the middle. There is a very clear wrong side - Russian equipment operated by Russian-sponsored terrorists and/or Russian military misidentifying civilian aircraft and shooting it down. Anything else is intentional misinformation.

"Terrorist" is the wrong word, it's obvious from the intercepts this was a tactical error on someone's part.

Terrorism isn't defined by actions so much as the reason. For the love of Jebus, it has a well understood meaning folks, look it up.

It is not for me to attempt to fathom the inscrutable workings of Providence. -- The Earl of Birkenhead

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