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Comment: Re:Sad (Score 1) 311

by Thwomp (#34585038) Attached to: Yahoo! To Close Delicious

Pinboard? I just heard about it myself. You have to pay around $7 for an account (the price increases as the user-base grows), however you can get a refund in the first three days if you don't like it.

It has the ability to import from Delicious and, naturally, export your data back out. Thought I'd give it a whirl.

Something in the roadmap caught my eye:

Get acquired by Yahoo and slowly grow useless

Yahoo!

+ - Yahoo! to close Delicious->

Submitted by Thwomp
Thwomp (773873) writes "A leaked internal presentation from Yahoo shows that Delicious, the popular bookmark sharing site, will be wound down. According to Daring Fireball's John Gruber the whole team was let go just yesterday.

It appears that Delicious is just one of the services in Yahoo's portfolio that is going the way of the Dodo."

Link to Original Source
Input Devices

How To Enter Equations Quickly In Class? 823

Posted by timothy
from the napkins-and-a-digital-camera dept.
AdmiralXyz writes "I'm a university student, and I like to take notes on my (non-tablet) computer whenever possible, so it's easier to sort, categorize, and search through them later. Trouble is, I'm going into higher and higher math classes, and typing "f_X(x) = integral(-infinity, infinity, f(x,y) dy)" just isn't cutting it anymore: I need a way to get real-looking equations into my notes. I'm not particular about the details, the only requirement is that I need to keep up with the lecture, so it has to be fast, fast, fast. Straight LaTeX is way too slow, and Microsoft's Equation Editor isn't even worth mentioning. The platform is not a concern (I'm on a MacBook Pro and can run either Windows or Ubuntu in a virtual box if need be), but the less of a hit to battery life, the better. I've looked at several dedicated equation editing programs, but none of them, or their reviews, make any mention of speed. I've even thought about investing in a low-end Wacom tablet (does anyone know if there are ultra-cheap graphics tablets designed for non-artists?), but I figured I'd see if anyone at Slashdot has a better solution."
Privacy

UK Government To Monitor All Internet Use 446

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the foil-hats-aren't-going-to-cut-it dept.
nk497 writes "The UK government has further detailed plans to track all communications — mobile phone calls, text messages, email and browser sessions — in the fight against terrorism, pedophiles and organized crime. The government said it's not looking to see what you're saying, just to whom and when and how. Contrary to previous plans to keep it all in a massive database, it will now let ISPs and telecoms firms store the data themselves, and access it when it feels it needs it." And to clarify this, Barence writes "The UK Government has dropped plans to create a massive database of all internet communications, following stern criticism from privacy advocates. Instead the Government wants ISPs and mobile phone companies to retain details of mobile phone calls, emails and internet sites visited. As with the original scheme, the actual content of the phone calls and messages won't be recorded, just the dates, duration and location/IP address of messages sent. The security services would then have to apply to the ISP or telecoms company to have the data released. The new proposals would also require ISPs to retain details of communications that originated in other countries but passed over the UK's network, such as instant messages."
Privacy

UK ISP Admitted to Spying on Customers 163

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the don't-worry-sir-we're-from-the-internet dept.
esocid writes "BT, an ISP located in the UK, tested secret spyware on tens of thousands of its broadband customers without their knowledge, it admitted yesterday. The scandal came to light only after some customers stumbled across tell-tale signs of spying. At first, they were wrongly told a software virus was to blame. BT said it randomly chose 36,000 broadband users for a 'small-scale technical trial' in 2006 and 2007. The monitoring system, developed by U.S. software company Phorm, formerly known as 121Media, known for being deeply involved in spyware, accesses information from a computer. It then scans every website a customer visits, silently checking for keywords and building up a unique picture of their interests. Executives insisted they had not broken the law and said no 'personally identifiable information' had been shared or divulged."
Privacy

Berners-Lee Rejects Tracking 155

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the along-with-everyone-else dept.
kernowyon writes "The BBC has an interview with Sir Tim Berners-Lee during his visit to the UK on their website currently. In it, he voices his concern about the practice of tracking activity on the internet — with particular reference to Phorm. Quotes Sir Tim with regard to his data — "It's mine — you can't have it. If you want to use it for something, then you have to negotiate with me.""
Privacy

+ - G-archiver includes "stolen" code says DLL

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "Pawel Lesnikowski, the author of mail.dll — a well respected .NET dll has put up a post on his website alleging that the author of G-archiver, John Terry stole his code. This follows the recent discovery by Dustin Brooks of G-Archiver Harvesting Google Mail Passwords. Commentators on the original coding horror blog posting have not only confirmed Dustin's discovery but have also highlighted John Terry's involvement with matemedia.com. John Terry himself is still denying any wrong doing."
Security

G-Archiver Harvesting Google Mail Passwords 462

Posted by kdawson
from the change-password-now dept.
Thwomp writes "It appears that a popular Gmail backup utility, G-Archiver, has been harvesting users' Gmail passwords. This was discovered when a developer named Dustin Brooks took a look at the code using a decompiler. He discovered a Gmail account name and password embedded in the source code. Brooks logged in and found over 1,700 emails all with user account information — with his own at the top. According to a story in Informationweek, he deleted the emails, changed the account password, and notified Google. The creator of G-Archiver has pulled the software, stating that it was debug code and was unintentionally left in the product."
Security

+ - G-Archiver Harvesting Google Mail Passwords

Submitted by Thwomp
Thwomp (773873) writes "It appears that a popular GMail back up utility, named G-Archiver, has been harvesting users GMail passwords, this was discovered when a Dustin Brooks took a look at the code using a decompiler. He discovered that user's account information was being sent by e-mail to another GMail account. With that account's password embedded in the source code the developer logged in and found over 1700 e-mails all with user's account information! The creator of G-Archiver has pulled the software stating that it was debug code and was unintentionally left in by a developer."
Programming

+ - What can a programmer do? 5

Submitted by
ppaulin
ppaulin writes "Maybe it's because I'm 40. Maybe it's because I'm sitting on my couch drinking scotch watching West Wing reruns. The bottom line is that I'm a programmer and I'm lucky to have some free time on my hands. I'm not a rich dot-com guy looking to create a foundation, just a programmer trying to figure out what to do with the next 20 years of my life. I'd like my kids to be proud of me. So I'm asking (and please hold the snark, it's too easy) — What can a programmer do?"
Censorship

+ - Wikileaks - CCHR Exposed As Scientology front-> 2

Submitted by
Anonymous
Anonymous writes "Wikileaks is now hosting a compressed archive of leaked emails that prove once and for all the "Citizens Commission on Human Rights" (CCHR), which mostly campaigns against Psychiatry, is a front of the Church of Scientology.

These files, submitted to Wikileaks by members of the 'Anonymous' group dedicated to peacefully protesting the Church of Scientology (CoS) organization, are internal e-mails sent to them from someone who formerly was, or maybe currently still is, on the inside of one of the organizations.

They reveal outlines of plans on how CCHR/CoS intend to distribute propaganda on the Internet, and compelling evidence that practice of 'Fair Game' in many forms is still alive and well, and aimed at not just critics but media establishments and members of the press. Though the term 'Fair Game' itself is no longer used by the organization, the intent is clear.

There is also potential evidence of the Scientologists often denied policy of "Disconnection" from families that was recently once again brought to light by the launching of exscientologykids by the ex scientologists Kendra Wiseman, Astra Woodcraft, and most damning of all Jenna Miscavige, the niece of the Chairman of the Board of the Church of Scientology.

The emails concerning their propaganda campaign may prove that the CCHR is guilty of breaking US laws against illegal lobbying, "The intent of these laws is to keep rich lobbying interests from looking bigger than they are. So that a small group of people (who may be pushing a particular piece of legislation) can make it look like there is a groundswell of public support (or opposition) when there is in fact no such thing."

Finally, if even $1 is proved to have transferred between the CCHR and the CoS, it is highly illegal, and should bring about the downfall of the Church of Scientology's US Tax exemption from the IRS and these emails certainly give cause for an investigation into their accounts."

Link to Original Source

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