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+ - Dogecoin Cryptocurrency raises $40,000 to provide fresh water Africa->

Submitted by scubamage
scubamage (727538) writes "TANA, Kenya — March 16, 2014 — Remote villages in Eastern Kenya may not be the first place you think about when it comes to the hot button topic of crypto-currencies but this past week investors and early adopters of Dogecoin used their "magical internet money" to help save lives in an area that suffers from seasonal drought and a lack of clean drinking water.

Over the past week the Dogecoin Foundation, a non-profit organization started by the founders of Dogecoin began accepting and collecting donations for their Doge4Water campaign to coincide with World Water Day on March 22nd. The foundation hoped to raise 40 million Dogecoins (est. $50,000 USD at current exchange rates) to be able to sponsor the Charity:Water initiative of constructing two hand-dug wells to provide access to clean water for the surrounding communities in the Tana River area of Eastern Kenya.

On Friday a generous benefactor who goes by the name of Hood (@savethemhood) helped achieve that goal by making a record tip of 14,000,000 Dogecoins via Twitter. With a tweet berating the wealthy for not doing enough, Hood summed up how he felt with this post, "It is astonishing that we have fellow humans on this planet without water. We have the wealth, but not the will. The greedy do nothing...." Users and foundation members alike were overwhelmed with an outpouring of gratitude on the /r/Dogecoin subreddit.

Since its beginning in early December the Dogecoin community has used their popularity and growing monetary value to help out several causes and charities. Donations from Dogecoin helped the Jamaican bobsled team to travel and compete in this year's Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia as well as fostering a community based not so much on gaining wealth but on giving it away. Hundreds of thousands, if not millions of Dogecoins are given away through tips each day on Reddit, Twitter, Facebook and other social media platforms.

While cryptocurrency has been a high profile topic this past week as to whether it should be regulated, especially due to several well publicized thefts and losses, or as to who the inventor may or may not be, the one coin which seems to take itself a little less seriously than the others firmly made its case that alternative currency can change the world, and for the better.

"

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Comment: Re:tax dollars at work (Score 1) 74

by ThreeGigs (#44465145) Attached to: NASA and ESA To Demonstrate Earth-Moon Laser Communication

we have been bouncing a laser off the moon since the late 60's

And receiving back only a few photons out of billions, making any meaningful data transfer impossible, unless you consider 1 bps meaningful.

can we please for the love of god end the multimillion dollar experiments that a 12 year old does on instructables?

Can we please educate people enough so that they understand that shining a light across a room is much easier than detecting it from 250,000 mies away?

Comment: It's not extortion (Score 3) 279

by ThreeGigs (#42386295) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Dealing With Anti-Spam Service Extortion?

Obviously anyone giving you legal advice has failed due diligence. From their site: "Every IP listed will expire 7 days after the LAST abuse is detected, and FREE of charge."

So, find out whoever is spamming, and put a stop to it. It might be different if your ASN is listed, but I'd still be looking for spam sources on your own network.

Comment: Re:This is pointless... (Score 2) 59

by ThreeGigs (#39756343) Attached to: The Physical Travelling Salesman Challenge

It can't be trivially reduced, though. Remember you're travelling _through_ a point, with speed, direction, momentum and orientation dependent on the point _before_ that.

So if you have 12 points, there are 10 different 'distances' between the last two. For example, in points A through L, the distance from K to L depends on whether you arrived at K from A, B, C, etc.

The original table would have 11 entries for each point, while the current challenge would require a table of 110 entries for each point.

The complexity increases from (n-1) to (n-1)*(n-2). Not quite squared, but close enough. IMHO that's the opposite of a trivial reduction.

Comment: Re:It wasn't a lineup. (Score 1) 227

by ThreeGigs (#39582051) Attached to: Toronto Police Use Facebook Picture in Online Lineup

Sorry, but _you_ need to read more carefully and thoroughly.

FTFA:
"She described it as "outrageous" that someone could "scroll down the friends list for the bar and point out someone that had brown hair and bangs" and that would be enough to enter someone into the justice system."

Note the "friends list for the bar" bit. Meaning, she must have friended the bar to be on its friends list.

You seem to have failed at either reading comprehension, or simple deductive logic.

Comment: They agreed to it when they signed up (Score 4, Insightful) 301

by ThreeGigs (#39189979) Attached to: Paypal Forces E-Book Publisher To Censor Erotic Content

There are many things you are not allowed to accept money for on PayPal. Most of them are illegal, but some, like guns and erotica, are not. But I do remember in PayPal's TOS that they did exclude sellers from taking payments for adult material.

So yeah, don't take PayPal and then complain because YOU didn't follow the rules.

However I will grant that the definition of what is, and isn't 'erotica', could be subject to wild swings of interpretation. However any merchant with enough volume has their own merchant account and doesn't need PayPal anyhow, so shouldn't need to worry about PP's interpretation.

Comment: Political agenda? (Score 4, Funny) 775

by ThreeGigs (#39018361) Attached to: Is Santorum's "Google Problem" a Google Problem?

"Sullivan, while making it clear he opposes Santorum's views, nonetheless suggests Google is long overdue to implement a disclaimer for the 'Santorum' search results. 'They are going to confuse some people,' he explains, 'who will assume Google's trying to advance a political agenda with its search results.'""

If Google _were_ to include a disclaimer, it would be pushing a political agenda. Unless the disclaimer was something like: "The search results below may indicate that the candidate of your choice is so hopelessly clueless about the web that they are unable to grab the top search result for their own name." Unless of course the Luddites now have a political party....

Comment: Talking greeting card hack (Score 3, Interesting) 399

by ThreeGigs (#38837805) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Techie Wedding Invitation Ideas?

Just hack one of those talking greeting / birthday cards. Yank the electronics and put them in your own card. I know there are cards that let you record exactly what you want on them, but they're a bit more expensive than the others. You could even personalize each voice invitation to match the person being invited.

It's different enough to be geeky and novel, but not so far-left-geeky that it'll have everyone wondering if they need to show up to your wedding in cosplay garb.

Comment: Don't expose the server to the web at all. (Score 1) 333

by ThreeGigs (#38572208) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Writing Hardened Web Applications?

If you really want to go above and beyond, don't let anyone access the web server directly at all. Instead, they would connect to an OS session on a machine you control via VNC, or perhaps Citrix Metaframe, etc.

The 'desktop' they're accessing can only access your 'web' server. Your server can't be accessed from, nor can it access the internet at large. The 'desktop' they access can be as locked down as you want, probably only showing a single app or browser running in a 'kiosk mode'.

In one swell foop (grin), you'll have eliminated almost all attack vectors, and as long as you have good input sanitizing between your 'kiosk app' and database, you should be fairly safe, even from future 0-day attacks.

When you don't know what you are doing, do it neatly.

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