Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!


Forgot your password?
Slashdot Deals: Deal of the Day - Pay What You Want for the Learn to Code Bundle, includes AngularJS, Python, HTML5, Ruby, and more. ×

Submission + - Newegg Customers Receiving Fake Intel Core 17 920 (overclock.net) 4

An anonymous reader writes: This first surfaced on TribalWar around seven o'clock last evening and on Overclock.net around midnight last night. Newegg still hasn't commented on this. It's not known whether this happened as fraud by another Newegg customer or it happened in shipping. The "processors" are made of Aluminum, and the "fans" look to be made of some kind of synthetic molded material. The "factory seal" was printed onto the box. The holographic stickers on the boxes were also faked.

More links:




Submission + - Web Browser Grand Prix (tomshardware.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Tom's Hardware has put Apple Safari 4.04, Google Chrome 4.0, Microsoft Internet Explorer 8, Mozilla FireFox 3.6, and Opera 10.50 through a gauntlet of speed tests and time trials to find out which Web browser is truly the fastest. How does your favorite land in the rankings?

Feed Engadget: iPad launches on April 3rd, pre-orders begin March 12th (engadget.com)

Word from Apple is out -- so get your credit cards ready. The iPad will be launching on Saturday April 3rd, but you'll be able to plunk down cold, hard cash for it in just a week. Pre-orders will begin on March 12th for the US version (non-3G) for that April street date, with the 3G version coming in late April along with iPads for eager buyers in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Switzerland and the UK. US pricing will be as follows (just in case you need to figure out how many piggy banks to smash):
  • 16GB WiFi only -- $499
  • 32GB WiFi only -- $599
  • 64GB WiFi only -- $699
  • 16GB WiFi + 3G -- $629
  • 32GB WiFi + 3G -- $729
  • 64GB WiFi + 3G -- $829

iPad launches on April 3rd, pre-orders begin March 12th originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 05 Mar 2010 09:02:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink | |Email this|Comments

Submission + - New lithography tech promises 10nm circuits (thinq.co.uk)

arcticstoat writes: Scientists at the University of Wisconsin have developed a new lithography technique that could result in silicon chips with 10nm circuits. Called molecular transfer printing (MTP), the technique uses a combination of block copolymers, which form crystal patterns that accurately reproduce etched silicon circuits. As well as reducing the cost of producing multiple silicon master chips, the technique can also reproduce circuit patterns where the gaps between the circuits are half the size of the original etching. The team, headed by scientist Paul Nealey, have already produced patterns on a sillicon wafer, in which the gaps between the features were only 15nm. Nealey is also confident that the team could produce features that measure just 10nm. As a point of comparison, most of today's CPUs and GPUs use 45nm, 40nm or 32nm circuits.
Role Playing (Games)

Looking Back At Dungeons & Dragons 189

An anonymous reader sends in a nostalgic piece about Dungeons & Dragons and the influence it's had on games and gamers for the past 36 years. Quoting: "Maybe there was something in the air during the early '70s. Maybe it was historically inevitable. But it seems way more than convenient coincidence that Gygax and Arneson got their first packet of rules for D&D out the door in 1974, the same year Nolan Bushnell managed to cobble together a little arcade machine called Pong. We've never had fun quite the same way since. Looking back, these two events set today's world of gaming into motion — the Romulus and Remus of modern game civilization. For the rest of forever, we would sit around and argue whether games should let us do more or tell us better stories."

New Theory of Gravity Decouples Space & Time 575

eldavojohn writes "Petr Horava, a physicist at the University of California in Berkeley, has a new theory about gravity and spacetime. At high energies, it actually snips any ties between space and time, yet at low energies devolves to equivalence with the theory of General Relativity, which binds them together. The theory is gaining popularity with physicists because it fits some observations better than Einstein's or Newton's solutions. It better predicts the movement of the planets (in an idealized case) and has a potential to create the illusion of dark matter. Another physicist calculated that under Horava Gravity, our universe would experience not a Big Bang but a Big Bounce — and the new theory reproduces the ripples from such an event in a way that matches measurements of the cosmic microwave background."

Intelsat Launches Hardware For Internet Routing From Space 83

coondoggie writes "A radiation-proof Cisco router was sent into space today aboard an Intelsat satellite with the goal of setting up military communications from space. The router/satellite combo is a key part of the US Department of Defense's Internet Routing In Space (IRIS) project, which aims to route IP voice, video and data traffic between satellites in space in much the same way packets are moved on the ground, reducing delays, saving on capacity and offering greater network flexibility, Cisco stated."

Australian Gov't Offers $560k Cryptographic Protocol For Free 163

mask.of.sanity writes "Australia's national welfare agency will release its 'unbreakable' AU$560,000 smart card identification protocol for free. The government agency wants other departments and commercial businesses to adopt the Protocol for Lightweight Authentication of ID (PLAID), which withstood three years of design and testing by Australian and American security agencies. The agency has one of Australia's most advanced physical and logical converged security systems: staff can access doors and computers with a single centrally-managed identity card, and user identities can be automatically updated as employees leave, are recruited or move to new departments. PLAID, which will be available soon, is to be used in the agency's incoming fleet of contact-less smartcards that are currently under trial by staff. It will replace existing identity cards that operate on PKI encryption."

US ISPs Using Push Polling To Stop Cheap Internet 417

An anonymous reader writes "What happens when a new ISP is started somewhere in the United States that completely blows out of the water all the other ISPs in the area, in terms of price and performance? Apparently, that question is being answered in North Carolina, where Greenlight Inc., a company started by a city government, is trying to offer faster, more reliable, and cheaper Internet service to the local residents. Time Warner and Embarq can't compete. So they are not only lobbying the state government to destroy the upstart competition, but are now using push polling methods to gain support, across the two cities that could benefit from the new ISP, for the 'Level the playing field' legislation they got introduced in the legislature." A local news outlet provides coverage more friendly to the incumbents' point of view.
The Media

Hearst To Launch E-Reader For Newspapers 143

thefickler writes "The credit crisis couldn't have come at a worse time for newspapers, which were already suffering at the hands of the Internet. Now it seems that the Hearst Corporation is planning to launch an e-reader later this year to try to save its dwindling newspaper readerships. Apparently the e-reader will have a bigger screen than the Kindle, helping it to accommodate ads. It's not clear whether Hearst will go it alone, or try to gather wider industry support for its venture. As one pundit observed, 'it seems a slender thread on which to hang the entire American newspaper industry.'"
The Military

Obama Helicopter Security Breached By File Sharing 408

Hugh Pickens writes "A company that monitors peer-to-peer file-sharing networks has discovered a potentially serious security breach involving President Barack Obama's helicopter. 'We found a file containing entire blueprints and avionics package for Marine One, which is the president's helicopter,' says Bob Boback, CEO of Tiversa, a security company that specializes in peer-to-peer technology. Tiversa was able to track the file, discovered at an IP address in Tehran, Iran, back to its original source. 'What appears to be a defense contractor in Bethesda, Md., had a file-sharing program on one of their systems that also contained highly sensitive blueprints for Marine One,' says Boback, adding that someone from the company most likely downloaded a file-sharing program, typically used to exchange music, without realizing the potential problems. 'I'm sure that person is embarrassed and may even lose their job, but we know where it came from and we know where it went.' Iran is not the only country that appears to be accessing this type of information through file-sharing programs. 'We've noticed it out of Pakistan, Yemen, Qatar and China. They are actively searching for information that is disclosed in this fashion because it is a great source of intelligence.'"

Life. Don't talk to me about life. - Marvin the Paranoid Anroid