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Submission + - Tech billionaires bankroll gold rush to mine asteroids (reuters.com)

fishmike writes: "Google Inc executives Larry Page and Eric Schmidt and filmmaker James Cameron are among those bankrolling a venture to survey and eventually extract precious metals and rare minerals from asteroids that orbit near Earth, the company said on Tuesday.

Planetary Resources, based in Bellevue, Washington, initially will focus on developing and selling extremely low-cost robotic spacecraft for surveying missions."

Submission + - Dutch Pirate Party ordered to stop encouragement to circumvent URL filters (wordpress.com)

Craefter writes: Brein, the Dutch sock puppet for the entertainment industry, was quick to react to yesterday's fall of the Dutch government by applying for a court order which demands that the Dutch Pirate Party must refrain from encouraging the public to circumvent Internet URL filtering. This would severely hamper the election campaign of the PP for the elections later this year.
What we see here is that the entertainment industry is trying to stifle democratic options in an election campaign. How could we end up in a situation where a couple of companies which only produce movies and music have such an influence on law and democratic processes?


Submission + - Plunder Downunder: How To Read Australia's iiTrial Piracy Verdict (itnews.com.au)

aesoteric writes: A lot has been said about the three-year, multi-million dollar legal battle between Hollywood studios and Australian ISP iiNet that finally exhausted all legal options last week. The court's decision brings relief and clarity for the internet industry on issues of liability in the digital age. But the victory is tempered by the over-confidence the decision affords ISPs and by the scale of the film industry's legal losses. Buoyed by its clean sweep, iiNet has made no secret it would prefer to walk away from attempts to create an industry scheme to address internet piracy. The High Court suggests legislative reform is the answer, though the Government has shown little appetite for it. And in the meantime, the studios' have been dealt a death blow on the quality of infringement notices sent to ISPs — they have to be of an interlocutory evidentiary standard before they could even be considered actionable. The key takeout from five of Australia's top IP law experts? Something's gotta give.

Those who claim the dead never return to life haven't ever been around here at quitting time.