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Submission + - /. Goes down in flame war 5

An anonymous reader writes: Slashdot users flame all site stories with comments about the sites forced switching over to Beta version. The comments are relentless, calling for a ban of the site from Feb 10 to Feb 17. The following post is being made in every story comment:
On February 5, 2014, Slashdot announced through a javascript popup that they are starting to "move in to" the new Slashdot Beta design.
Slashdot Beta is a trend-following attempt to give Slashdot a fresh look, an approach that has led to less space for text and an abandonment of the traditional Slashdot look. Much worse than that, Slashdot Beta fundamentally breaks the classic Slashdot discussion and moderation system.
If you haven't seen Slashdot Beta already, open this [slashdot.org] in a new tab. After seeing that, click here [slashdot.org] to return to classic Slashdot.
We should boycott stories and only discuss the abomination that is Slashdot Beta until Dice abandons the project.
We should boycott slashdot entirely during the week of Feb 10 to Feb 17 as part of the wider slashcott [slashdot.org]
Moderators — only spend mod points on comments that discuss Beta
Commentors — only discuss Beta
http://slashdot.org/recent [slashdot.org] — Vote up the Fuck Beta stories
Keep this up for a few days and we may finally get the PHBs attention.
Captcha: fuckbeta

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Why Can't Slashdot Classic and Slashdot Beta Continue to Co-Exist? 9

Hugh Pickens DOT Com writes: Slashdot has been a big part of my life since I had my my first stories accepted over ten years ago. Some people my age do crossword puzzles to keep their mental agility, some do sudoko, or play bridge. I enjoy searching for and putting together a story a day for slashdot because it helps keep me on my toes to have readers find errors and logical fallacies in my submissions and I enjoy learning from the different points of view expressed on a story I have submitted. That's why I have been so discouraged in the past several years to see readership in slashdot drop off. As a close observer of this web site, I know that ten years ago it was unheard of for any accepted story to get less than 100 comments and there was at least a story a day that got over 1,000 comments. Those days are long gone. Not it's not uncommon to see some stories garner only a few dozen comments. That's how web sites die. If you slip below a critical level of readership, readers will abandon the site completely. I know from my own experience running a web site devoted to the Peace Corps that I used to have hundreds of comments to some of my stories but once comments slipped below a certain threshold, then they disappeared altogether. I think that slashdot is nearing that threshold and I fear that imposing Slashdot Beta on the site's readership will push it over the edge and I don't want to see that happen. I'd like to propose that slashdot continue running slashdot classic and slashdot beta in parallel. I'll stick with classic most of the time. One of the best features of slashdot classic is that comments can be displayed in four formats (threaded, nested, no comment, and flat) and in two directions (oldest first and newest first) providing a lot of flexibility in watching conversations develop. I switch between the formats several times a day depending on what I want to see. But slashdot beta also has its advantages in certain situations. Slashdot needs a blockbuster story or two every day where people can pile on and slashdot beta facilitates this by putting the most commented story at the top of the page and I think that is a good thing. Still I'll use slashdot beta occasionally when I'm on a mobile device but slashdot classic will be the format I use on my desktop. So don't deprecate slashdot classic. That would be like Microsoft disabling Windows 7 and forcing everyone to use Windows 8. And not even Microsoft is that stupid.

Submission + - Slashdot BETA Discussion (slashdot.org) 60

mugnyte writes: With Slashdot's recent restyled "BETA" slowly rolled to most users, there's been a lot of griping about the changes. This is nothing new, as past style changes have had similar effects. However, this pass there are significant usability changes: A narrower read pane, limited moderation filtering, and several color/size/font adjustments. BETA implies not yet complete, so taking that cue — please list your specific, detailed opinoins, one per comment, and let's use the best part of slashdot (the moderation system) to raise the attention to these. Change can be jarring, but let's focus on the true usability differences with the new style.
Security

Submission + - GoDaddy Goes Down, Anonymous Claims Responsibility

An anonymous reader writes: A member of the Anonymous hacktivist group appears to have taken down GoDaddy with a massive Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS). The widespread issue seems to be affecting countless websites and services around the world, although not for everyone. Godaddy.com is down, but so are some of the site’s DNS servers, which means GoDaddy hosted e-mail accounts are down as well, and lots more. It’s currently unclear if the servers are being unresponsive or if they are completely offline. Either way, the result is that if your DNS is hosted on GoDaddy, your site may also look as if it is down, because it cannot resolve.
Security

Submission + - Theives go on $45k shopping spree after stealing 2 (scmagazine.com.au) 1

mask.of.sanity writes: Thieves have made off with $45k after they intercepted a victim's two factor online banking codes used to verify large transactions.

The scammers got the Australian executive's mobile number from his daughter, and work place details from his willing secretary.

Armed with this data, they bluffed Vodafone which ported his phone number, meaning the criminals could verify the bank's two factor verification codes generated during their spending spree and the victim never knew a thing.

Iphone

Submission + - New Attack Uses iPhone as PC Keylogger (threatpost.com)

Trailrunner7 writes: Researchers from MIT and Georgia Tech have developed a new technique that enables them to use the accelerometer in an iPhone or other smartphone to capture keystrokes from a nearby PC and decipher the typed words with about 80 percent accuracy. The tactic, while quite complicated, could be used to conduct password-recovery or other attacks on unsuspecting victims.

The research relies on the fact that the accelerometers in modern smartphones have become sensitive enough to detect the vibrations produced by someone typing on a keyboard a few inches away on a surface such as a desk or table. The accelerometer is designed to detect when the phone is tilted or moved and is used in a number of applications, including the feature that flips the image on the screen when the phone is turned. However, the research team of Patrick Traynor, Arunabh Verma and Henry Carter of Georgia Tech and Philip Marquardt of MIT's Lincoln Laboratory discovered that it can also function as a discreet keylogger.

Submission + - Hotfile countersues Warner (publicknowledge.org)

Tom writes: Hotfile went out of its way to bow to the movie industry and gave the likes of Warner a special account that they could use to delete content — any content. Apparently, that's just what they did as Hotfiles countersuit claims after Warner sued them anyways. They claim Warner deleted Public Domain content, Free Software and many other items that could not possibly be confused with copyrighted movies if one took even a single look.
The funny part? They are suing Warner under the DMCA, the very law the music industry bought/bribed for themselves.

Education

Submission + - Money, Values Clashing at Public Universities

theodp writes: Back in the day, proponents of what was known as the Wisconsin Idea held that that the purpose of a public university was to serve the state's residents. But, according to a surprisingly candid new survey of admissions directors by Inside Higher Ed, that quaint idea is giving way. An ideal student these days, from many colleges' point of view, is increasingly about money. Among all four-year institutions, the admissions strategy judged most important over the next two or three years — driven by high figures in the public sector — was the recruitment of more out-of-state and international students, who pay significantly more at public institutions. The interest in full-pay students is so strong that 10% of colleges report that the full-pay students they are admitting have lower grades and test scores than do other admitted applicants. Concern was also expressed about the use of controversial commission-based agents to boost international student enrollments (Federal law bars the use of such agents to recruit American students).'This isn't about globalization or increased educational diversity,' says USC's Jerome A. Lucido. 'They need the money.'

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