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Comment: Quality Vs. Quantity (Score 3, Interesting) 92

by Greyfox (#48679443) Attached to: Boston Elementary, Middle Schools To Get a Longer Day
I moved every three or four years growing up -- I was a military brat. Luckily for me, Dad was stationed at a post in upstate New York for most of the time I was in high school. I attended a very high quality high school there, so I have a first-hand basis for comparison between good educational systems and bad ones. The school in New York could get more done in a 40 minute class than the bad schools I attended down south could manage in an hour. We'd get in, get right down to business and get out before we had time to get bored. Class sizes were smaller and the teacher didn't have to spend 20 minutes getting everyone to settle down.

The difference in focus was apparent as soon as you walked into the building. The school in New York had posters for good colleges and educational awards on prominent display and had very little focus on sports. Despite this, they had a much better PE program -- they had an Olympic-sized swimming pool and offered elective options for cross-country skiing and archery, among other things.

The schools I attended in the South had larger, longer classes and were entirely focused on football. If your aptitude didn't fall into the range of something to do with football, they pretty much just wanted to waste your time until they could kick you out into the real world with a promising career as a gas station attendant to look forward to. You were either a future football player or a future football viewer. That's all they knew how to do.

What no one in any school ever told me was that I was the captain of my own fate. We all are. So if your school is bad and you don't want to grow up to be a gas station attendant, you'd better find some other way to learn the math and science that today's careers demand. The world isn't going to get any easier.

Comment: Re:They're assholes. (Score 1) 300

by rossz (#48678607) Attached to: Why Lizard Squad Took Down PSN and Xbox Live On Christmas Day

I think at least some blame does need to be lay at the feat of Sony and Microsoft here, but not because of 'network security' but rather creating the risk in the first place where there does not need to be one.

How about I kick in your front door and steal all your stuff? After all, you didn't put in place absolutely perfect security, so it's really your own fault for allowing me into your home.

Or a better analogy. I park a big rig in your driveway so you can't get into your home. That's what a DDOS is, basically. And if the "enemy" has enough resources, a DDOS is nearly impossible to prevent.

Comment: Re: For that, you'd have to do a different attack (Score 1) 300

by Tom (#48678501) Attached to: Why Lizard Squad Took Down PSN and Xbox Live On Christmas Day

I don't think you understand how amplification attacks work.

I wrote advisories on that more than 10 years ago, so please go ahead and lecture me.

Your home network should not allow a request with an IP that doesn't belong to it out. If I'm the router that connects 1.2.3.0/24 to the Internet, I shouldn't put a packet that claims it originates from 5.6.7.8 on the wire.

The only places where a package that isn't part of my network should be routed through is when my network is a transit network.

Comment: Re:Rubbish (Score 1) 300

by Tom (#48678483) Attached to: Why Lizard Squad Took Down PSN and Xbox Live On Christmas Day

I know from my own experience how right you are, but that, exactly, is the problem. This "it didn't crash in 10 minutes, ship it" approach is utterly horrible. It's become industry standard instead of being taken out back to be shot, and that is a really serious problem.

People shouldn't be used to computers crashing - they should demand that they don't do so.

Comment: I Think We're Going About This Wrong (Score 1) 425

by Greyfox (#48677343) Attached to: Paul Graham: Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In
Instead if replacing comparatively-cheap programmers with cheaper overseas programmers, why not replace expensive middle and upper management with cheaper overseas middle and upper management? For what our CEO makes, I could hire a couple hundred engineers. But I bet I could find a guy from India who'd be happy to be our CEO for about what one engineer makes. And he'd be every bit as effective at it as our CEO is!

Comment: Re:I think the bigger issue (Score 4, Informative) 31

by MillionthMonkey (#48676831) Attached to: Net Neutrality Comments Overtaxed FCC's System
See link: http://sunlightfoundation.com/... Half of the petitions were anti-NN, and mostly came from a Koch-backed organization's form letter:

Dear Mr. Wheeler, As an American citizen, I wanted to voice my opposition to the FCC's crippling new regulations that would put federal bureaucrats in charge of internet freedom, and urge you to stop these regulations before they're enacted. If the federal government goes through these plans to regulate the internet, I know that the internet will change -- and not for the better. [ INSERT VARIANT PARAGRAPH COMMENT HERE ] Like many Americans, I believe that the internet should remain free of government control and unnecessary regulation -- just as it has for the last twenty years of unprecedented growth. Please stop the FCC's dangerous new regulations, and protect the future of internet freedom here in America. Sincerely, [APPLICANT NAME] [APPLICANT HOME ADDRESS]

As for the "VARIANT PARAGRAPH COMMENT", apparently you were given several selections to choose from, including the following:

The Internet is the biggest economic, intellectual, and artistic success story of the century, and it rose up because of free people, not stifling government. The federal government needs to keep its hands off the Internet. It is not broken, and it does not need to be fixed. It is the federal government, not the Internet, that is broken, and in need of fixing.

One can make an appeal to justice for persecuted cable companies:

Before our government can handcuff a citizen, it must have some reasonable evidence that they have done something wrong. Before the FCC places regulatory handcuffs on Internet providers, shouldn't the government present evidence that they have actually done something wrong?

Or maybe this is your style:

The ideological leader of the angry liberals calling for you to reduce the Internet to a public utility is Robert McChesney, the avowed Marxist founder of the socialist group Free Press. In an interview with SocialistProject.ca, McChesney said: âoeWhat we want to have in the U.S. and in every society is an Internet that is not private property, but a public utility...At the moment, the battle over network neutrality is not to completely eliminate the telephone and cable companies. We are not at that point yet. But the ultimate goal is to get rid of the media capitalists in the phone and cable companies and to divest them from control.â In a country of over 300 million people, even an extremist like McChesney can find, perhaps, millions of followers. But you should know better than to listen to them.

Comment: Reading Between The Lines (Score 1) 31

by Greyfox (#48676701) Attached to: Net Neutrality Comments Overtaxed FCC's System
I'd guess they probably tried to dump several gigabytes of comments into one gigantic XML document, and their... lessee 18 years... I'm going to say, DG/UX system couldn't handle a file of that size. Is that about right? I don't even want to know what hokey solution they duct-taped to their system to get it to spit out XML.

If only there were some sort of magical agency that knew how to deal with communications and could actually design a decent transfer format for these guys. I bet that very same agency might know why it would be important that the people who provide access to the Internet should not be allowed to constrain those channels based on who you decide to talk to.

Comment: It Really Does Feel Like We're Going Backward (Score 2) 130

Since the mid 2000s I feel like I've been seeing a lot more BFI solutions, BAD BFI solutions, than I did back in the '90's. I guess back then you had to use some finessee in your programming to get the performance you needed out of the system. Either that or I'm working with more bad developers lately. I suppose that's also possible.

Comment: Ooh, I Have An Idea! (Score 4, Insightful) 180

by Greyfox (#48675231) Attached to: MIT Unifies Web Development In Single, Speedy New Language
What if, instead of doing that, we came up with a language that you could use to build your program without a browser? Now stay with me here, I know this sounds crazy, but it could work! Since you're not working with a fundamentally stateless protocol, this language wouldn't need to maintain state externally to itself! All its variables and state would be self-contained! But since you might want to pull data in from the network or a database or something, you could add interfaces to that functionality to your language! Wouldn't that be something? I know, I know, this suggestion has been made, like 12648430 times before, but I think it's a really good idea that could work!

Comment: Re:For that, you'd have to do a different attack (Score 1) 300

by Tom (#48675107) Attached to: Why Lizard Squad Took Down PSN and Xbox Live On Christmas Day

spoof the IP address of your target (...) it proves that the DNS protocol itself is beyond repair

No, it proves that the network you are connected to is braindead because it still allows IP spoofing.

And that EVERY company on the net is susceptible to something like that because unlimited bandwidth does not exist.

It used to be really easy to knock someone off the Internet. It's not so easy anymore. For some of the really big targets, being able to muster the bandwidth alone would be an impressive demonstration of power. Keeping them offline for more than a few seconds while their Anti-DDoS countermeasures deploy would be something that few players smaller than a nation state level can pull off.

MS and Sony have a security that matches the opaqueness of an erotic dancer's dress

Not really. I hate them as much as most people with three working brain cells, but they've both done quite a lot about security. It's just not enough and - like every company - they make decisions to not invest in some security measures because the ROI simply isn't there.

Comment: Re:Rubbish (Score 3, Insightful) 300

by Tom (#48675071) Attached to: Why Lizard Squad Took Down PSN and Xbox Live On Christmas Day

Nonsense. On their gaming systems you are unlikely to find any data that the companies would consider valuable. And 10+ years of experience show that "oops, we leaked customer data" isn't really a game-changer.

But cries from customers can be. Denying them the joy of their freshly gifted gaming console can be very powerful. It's not the nice way, definitely not, but it makes headlines.

I doubt it's going to change anything, because customers are too used to computers not working. That is the real damage that 30 years of Microsoft dominance have done to the world.

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