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Comment: Re:Australian Wheel Patent (Score 1) 35

On closer inspection the Australian patent that was granted is less absurd than it seems, as it was more of a quasi-patent:

Innovation patents last for a maximum of 8 years, whereas standard patents last for maximum of 20 years

... which is why the article quote "I discovered today that the Australian patent office has — quietly — revoked the patent it granted, in the year 2001, for the wheel" is even more absurd. It expired in 2009. This was "revoked" in the same way that the moldy cheese in the back of your fridge with a best-by date in January has been "quietly revoked".

Comment: Re:Pretty sure this won't work (Score 1) 308

by Theaetetus (#47420065) Attached to: Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

As I and other have already pointed out, we are not blaming her for becoming a victim.

There's an entire thread titled "Why yes, we should blame the victim here", with the root post rated +5 Insightful. Yeah, people are blaming her.

Oh, well, and since we all know that a name is always 100% accurate and tells us everything...

Did you actually read the thread, or just the headline and thought "oh, that must support my position?" Because I read it, and some of them make a very good point regarding the context of this particular situation.

So, you're endorsing the following?

Don't want your nudes to end up in public? Don't take nudes that you wouldn't want the public to see. Then you can be a true victim. The whole concept of "revenge porn," insofar as it applies to nudes and porn freely made and disseminated, is ever so much "I want my freedom.... but I don't want my choices to have consequences of which I don't approve."

We have a term for that behavior. It's called behaving like a child.

Is this one of those "very good points"? Because it sure as hell looks like blaming her for becoming a victim, something you claimed wasn't happening.

Comment: Re:Pretty sure this won't work (Score 1) 308

by Theaetetus (#47419407) Attached to: Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

As I and other have already pointed out, we are not blaming her for becoming a victim.

There's an entire thread titled "Why yes, we should blame the victim here", with the root post rated +5 Insightful. Yeah, people are blaming her.

But quick, respond with a No True Slashdotter about how those are fringe elements and marginal and don't represent the views of a large portion of Slashdot.

Comment: Re:Pretty sure this won't work (Score 0) 308

by Theaetetus (#47419357) Attached to: Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

It is the same crap people pull on rape victims all the time, finding some way to socially punish them for trying to bring consequences for their attacker's actions.

You know, as a close relative of a victim of violent sexual assault, I take offense to your supposition that what my family member went through is exactly the same as what this woman is doing to herself. Don't bandy about the term "rape" for everything you disagree with, as it desensitizes people from the severity of that particular crime.

GP poster wasn't "bandy[ing] about the term 'rape' for everything they disagree with" nor were they offering a "supposition that what [your] family member went through is exactly the same as what this woman is doing to herself." The comparison was not "rape" vs. "privacy intrusion on a revenge porn site"; rather, it was victim blaming, which occurs both to rape victims and here, to this woman. GP poster was entirely correct, and you were the one who tried to shut down the conversation by saying that GP can't talk about victim blaming because, if you only read every third word or something, it may somehow, in some straw-grabbing sense, "desensitize people". You're concern trolling.

Comment: Re:Recent allegations... (Score 1) 207

Going by what modders are pulling out of the game it does appear that it is true.

Those modders are praising the wonderful graphics they get with the enabled settings, while admitting that they get stuttering and frame rates below 30 fps. Doesn't sound like Ubisoft "handicapped" the graphics to me, so much as fixed the performance issues.

Comment: Re:Recent allegations... (Score 1) 207

I'm just saying. Everything we know points to it being deliberately handicapped. The game actually runs better when you enable the settings that made it look gorgeous at E3. It runs better with better graphical fidelity.

... if you never leave a small area, so that everything is full cached. Otherwise, you get significant stuttering. Look at any of the threads on the "mod" that enabled the settings - even as people praise it, they acknowledge that frame rates drop to 30 fps maximum with bursts of less than that vs. 60 fps without the "mod".

Comment: Recent allegations... (Score -1, Troll) 207

This comparison should be viewed in light of the recent allegations that the PC version's graphics were deliberately handicapped.

Were the allegations true?

Well, no... But...

... uh...

This comparison should be viewed in light of the recent allegations that the name Watch Dogs infringes on numerous trademarks by Swatch!

... are those allegations true?

Again, no... But...

... uh...

This comparison should be viewed in light of the recent allegations that Ubisoft's developers are child molesters!

... are any of those allegations true?

Well...

... um...

This comparison should be viewed in light of the recent shut up!

Hey, Slashdot? How about reporting News for Nerds, not Unsubstantiated Opinions for Nerds? We already have Fox News for that.

Comment: Re:Done, and done well already. (Score 1) 65

In short, this is a wheel that's already been invented. I don't see anything "novel" or even better than what we have had already.

Then, with all due respect, you don't know what the word "novel" means. Something is novel when it is new or different from what has been done before. This is a thimble that sits on the user's index finger, allowing them to make 3D gestures in space. That's certainly novel compared to the 3DConexion interface, which is a knob with 6 degrees of freedom. They're clearly different devices, and accordingly, this one is novel compared to the Space Navigator.

Now, maybe what you really meant was that this isn't an improvement on the 3DConexion stuff. That, although new and different, it doesn't provide any advantages over the Space Navigator. But there, you'd be wrong, too - the Navigator requires the user to use two separate pointing devices, as well as shifting between Navigator and keyboard. The thimble, however, allows the user to make those gestures, plus dragging across a surface (which the Navigator can't do), as well as allowing the user to return to the keyboard and type without removing the device. Maybe those aren't features you'd appreciate or prefer, but they're certainly different features that the Navigator simply can't do.

Comment: Re:No reception... (Score 3, Informative) 128

by Theaetetus (#47373069) Attached to: FAA's Ruling On Smartphones During Takeoff Has Had Little Impact

...at 36,000ft. That's why I never use mine... After about 7,000ft I get 0 bars. I'm not going to pay $18 to use WiFi for longer than an hour so I'll just use the time to drink and relax.

I've got a dozen games, about two hundred books, and a handful of tv shows and movies on my iPad. I use it every flight, and it's annoying being stuck reading the in-flight magazine during takeoff and landing.

Comment: Re:Better question... (Score 1) 228

by Theaetetus (#47365977) Attached to: Nathan Myhrvold's Recipe For a Better Oven

You want to talk about preconceived bias? From you comment history, you claim to be a patent attorney. You're aggressive in defending patent trolls in general and this one in particular.

At no point did I defend patent trolls, and in fact, you even replied to my comment saying "Hate him for his IP policies if you want, but that doesn't mean you have to hate his cooking." That's not a defense of patent trolling - it's a defense of cooking.

It doesn't take a lot to connect the dots.

The dots being that you are so outraged over patents that if someone has anything to do with patents whatsoever, then everything they do must be the most evilest thing in the world. Have a patent? You must eat kittens. Work for the USPTO? Probably torture babies for fun on the weekends. Founded a patent troll company? Clearly, your grill must burn the souls of the damned instead of propane.

Pro-tip - learn to compartmentalize. People have many different aspects to their lives. Hating everything someone does because of one thing they do only makes you insane. It certainly doesn't help your credibility.

Comment: Re:Better question... (Score 0) 228

by Theaetetus (#47365313) Attached to: Nathan Myhrvold's Recipe For a Better Oven

What's your point? Are you implying that in order to criticize someone for taking an undue portion of the credit for other people's work, that I have to do a amount of work comparable to what the person I'm criticizing is claiming in the exact same field?

You haven't shown that it's an "undue" portion, and you certainly can't speak from experience as to what's "due". How much of your anger is simply preconceived bias?

Comment: Re:Better question... (Score 0) 228

by Theaetetus (#47364745) Attached to: Nathan Myhrvold's Recipe For a Better Oven

Because, IV and patent trolling aside, he's also the author of Modernist Cuisine and an award-winning BBQ chef. Hate him for his IP policies if you want, but that doesn't mean you have to hate his cooking.

And how the fuck am I supposed to evaluate his cooking if I have to worry about being sued for infringing his recipe by making dinner for guests?

What's a reasonable royalty for your dinner for your guests? Is it $0? What if he collected treble damages - why, that would be 3 times $0!

... I don't think you have anything to worry about.

Comment: Re:Utter drivel (Score 1, Flamebait) 228

by Theaetetus (#47364371) Attached to: Nathan Myhrvold's Recipe For a Better Oven

Given that he raises the spectre of salmonella from uneven temperature in sous-vide cooking, it's pretty clear he knows fuck all about cooking. Hey Nathan? Sous vide is done in a precision-controlled water bath, you numpty. Not an oven.

From the article:

Domestic ovens tend to swing in temperature and can be off by as much as 5 percent at any point during cooking. At 205 C—a temperature at which you might cook a turkey—that 5 percent isn’t a big deal. But consider a style of cooking known as sous vide, in which you cook food in bags in a water bath at low temperatures such as 60 C, near the threshold at which bacteria can survive. Here, 5 percent can be the difference between safe and unsafe.

He raises the spectre of salmonella from uneven temperature to point out why ovens can't do the low and slow temps in sous vide cooking. And I'm going to go out on a limb and guess that he knows significantly more than fuck all about cooking.

Comment: Re:1200 C?? (Score 2) 228

by Theaetetus (#47364313) Attached to: Nathan Myhrvold's Recipe For a Better Oven

"With reasonable energy efficiency, electric broilers can heat quickly and reliably to temperatures as high as 2,200 C. Maximum settings are typically restricted to 1,200 C in order to extend the life of the heating element and avoid charring the food."

I think repeatedly confusing C and F should immediately disqualify someone as an oven engineer. Or an oven operator, for that matter. :-)

What about confusing the temperature of the food or the air in the oven and the temperature of the heating element?

Electric broilers use bars or rods made from Nichrome, an alloy of nickel and chromium (and often iron) that heats up when electricity passes through it. With reasonable energy efficiency, electric broilers can heat quickly and reliably to temperatures as high as 2,200 C. Maximum settings are typically restricted to 1,200 C in order to extend the life of the heating element and avoid charring the food.

The nichrome bars heat up to 1200C. They heat up the air and also radiate in the infrared to cook the food.

I have no idea why so many people reading this article got confused about that point and think the guy's trying to cook food to 1200C.

"I've seen the forgeries I've sent out." -- John F. Haugh II (jfh@rpp386.Dallas.TX.US), about forging net news articles

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